References/Algebra (cont.d)

Miscellaneous Notes on Algebra

Eisenbud, Commutative Algebra

Chapter 0

  • A ring is an abelian group \(R\) with multiplication \((a, b) \mapsto ab\) and \(1\); \(R\) satisfies

    \begin{align*} a(bc) &= (ab)c \\ a(b+c) &= ab+ac \\ (b+c)a &= ba + ca \\ 1a &=a1 = a. \end{align*}

    The first equality is of associativity, the second and the third of distributivity and the last of identity.

    A ring \(R\) is commutative if in addition \(ab = ba\) for all \(a, b \in R\).

    A unit in a ring \(R\) is a ring element that is invertible, i.e., for such a \(u\) there exists \(v \in R\) s.t. \(uv = 1\). In this case, \(v\) is the inverse of \(u\) and unique.

    A field is a ring where every nonzero element is invertible.

    A zero divisor in \(R\) is a nonzero element \(r \in R\) for which there exists a nonzero \(s \in R\) such that \(rs = 0\).

    An ideal in a commutative ring \(R\) is an additive subgroup \(I\) such that if \(r \in R\) and \(s \in I\) then \(rs \in I\). Engage a ring element and an ideal element then their product belongs to the ideal; ideal absorbs ring elements. For all \(t \in I\) such that

    \[ t = \sum r_i s_i, r_i \in R, s_i \in I\]

    we say ideal \(I\) is generated by \(\{s_i\}\). A principal ideal is generated by one element. Every ideal in Euclidean domain is principal. If \(K\) is a field, then \(K[x]\) is a PID. since every ideal is of the form \((x^i)\).

    An prime ideal in \(R\) is a proper ideal and if \(f, g \in R\), product in the ideal \(fg \in I\) implies one of them is in the ideal \(f \in I\) or \(g \in I\). An element is prime if it generates a prime ideal.

    The ring \(R\) is a domain if \(0\) is prime.

    A maximal ideal is a proper ideal not contained in any other proper ideal. \(R\) is a local ring if \(P\) is the unique maximal ideal for which \(R/P\) is a field. Local ring sometimes is denoted \((R, P)\).

    A ring homomorphism from a ring \(R\) to a ring \(S\) is a homomorphism of abelian groups that preserves multiplication and takes identity of \(R\) to that of \(S\). A subring is a subset closed under addition, subtraction, multiplication and contains identity of parent ring.

    Let \(R, S\) be rings. Define direct product \(R \times S\) as the set of pairs \((a, b)\) where \(a \in R\), \(b \in S\) made into a ring by componentwise operations

    \begin{align*} (a, b) + (a', b') &= (a+a', b+b') \\ (a,b)(a',b') &= (aa',bb'). \end{align*}

    A commutative algebra over \(R\) is a commutative ring \(S\) together with a ring homomorphism \(\alpha : R \to S\). In most cases, it will be a polynomial ring over a field \(R = S/I\) or the localization of such a ring at a prime ideal.

  • An irreducible ring element \(r \in R\) is one that is not a unit and if \(r = st\) with \(s, t \in R\), then either \(s\) or \(t\) is a unit. A UFD is an integral domain whose elements are factored uniquely into irreducibles.

    Ascending chain condition on principal ideals is written as

    \[ (a_1) \subset (a_2) \subset \cdots \subset (a_i) \subset \cdots, \]

    where \(a_i\) is divisible by \(a_{i+1}\). Thus for large \(i\), the factorizations of \(a_i\)’s are the same up to units, hence \((a_i) = (a_{i+1})\) for \(i\) large enough. Conversely, Noether implies factorization into irreducibles. (Prove by contradiction; assume the contrary, Noether does not imply factorization into irreducibles, then some element in the ring does not have factorization into irreducibles. One of the factors of this element cannot have factorization into irreducibles either. Repeating this argument, the ascending chain never terminates. A contradiction.) If all irreducibles are prime, then Noether plus factorization into irreducibles implies UFD.

  • Given a ring \(R\), an $R$-module \(M\) is an abelian group with \(R\) action on \(M\) \(R\times M \to M\), \((r, m) \mapsto rm\). It satisfies the for all \(r, s \in R\) and \(m, n \in M\),

    \begin{align*} r(sm) &= (rs)m \\ r(m+n) &= rm + rn \\ (r+s)m &= rm + sm \\ 1m &= m. \end{align*}

    The first equality is of associativity, the second and the third of bilinearity and the last of identity.

    The most common $R$-modules of interest would be ideals \(I\) of a ring and quotient rings \(R/I\).

    An annihilator of a module \(M\) is

    \[ {\rm ann \,} M = \{ r\in R \mid rM = 0 \}.\]

    Given two ideals of ring \(R\), the ideal quotient \((I:J)\) is the set of ring elements such that \(fJ \subset I\), i.e., \(\{ f\in R \mid fJ \subset I\}\). This notation suggests division. Similarly there is submodule quotient \((M : N) = \{ f \in R \mid fN \subset M\}\) for submodules \(M, N\) of an $R$-module \(P\). For quotient of a submodule \(M \subset P\) and an ideal \(I \subset R\), it is defined as the set of module elements in \(P\) such that \(\{p \in P \mid Ip \subset M\}\).

    The direct sum of two $R$-modules \(M,N\) is the module \(M \bigoplus N = \{ (m,n) \mid m \in M, n \in N\}\) with module structure \(r(m,n) = (rm,rn)\). For finite indices, direct product is the same as direct sum. The two only differ for infinite indices. Direct sum is a proper subset of direct product. In the sense of category, direct product is the product, direct sum is the coproduct.

    A free $R$-module is isomorphic to a direct sum of copies of \(R\). If a module \(M\) is finitely generated, \(M \simeq R^n\) and \(n\) is the rank of \(M\).

Chapter 1

  • A ring \(R\) is Noether if every ideal of \(R\) is finitely generated. It is equivalent to ascending chain conditions on ideals of \(R\). An $R$-module \(M\) is Noether if every submodule if finitely generated.
  • Theorem 1.2, Corollary 1.3, 1.4 and the definition of graded ring in Section 1.5
    • Theorem 1.2 If a ring \(R\) is Noether, then the polynomial ring \(R[x]\) is also Noether.
    • Corollary 1.3 A homomorphic image of a Noetherian ring is Noether. If a ring \(R_0\) is Noether and \(R\) is a finitely generated algebra over \(R_0\), then \(R\) is Noether.
    • Proposition 1.4 If a ring \(R\) is Noether and $R$-module \(M\) is finitely generated then \(M\) is Noether.
  • A graded ring is a ring \(R\) together with a direct sum decomposition

    \[ R = R_0 \oplus R_1 \oplus R_2 \oplus \cdots \]

    as abelian groups such that \(R_i R_j \subset R_{i+j}\) for all \(i,j \geq 0\). A homogeneous element of \(R\) is an element of one of the groups \(R_i\) and a homogeneous ideal of \(R\) is an ideal generated by homogeneous elements.

    The simplest example is the ring of polynomials graded by degree. Given a polynomial ring \(S = k[x_1, x_2, \ldots, x_n]\), the grading

    \[ S = S_0 \oplus S_1 \oplus \cdots, \]

    where \(S_i\) is the vector space of homogeneous polynomials (forms) of degree \(i\).

  • Gauss established the fundamental theorem of algebra which relates a polynomial in one variable (an algebraic object) to a set of its roots (a geometric object). Hilbert’s Nullstellensatz generalizes the fundamental theorem of algebra to some ideals of polynomials in several variables.

    An element \(f\) of a polynomial ring \(k[x_1, \ldots, x_n]\) taking values in \(k\) is a polynomial function on an $n$-dimensional vector space \(k^n\) over \(k\). If field \(k\) is infinite, then the only polynomial function that vanishes identically on \(k^n\) is the \(0\) function. Also when field \(k\) is infinite, different polynomials define different polynomial functions. Thus Polynomial ring can be thought of as ring of polynomial functions on \(k^n\). This way, \(k^n\) is called affine $n$-space over \(k\), denoted \(\AA^n(k)\) or \(\AA^n\).

CLS, Ideals, Varieties and Algorithms

Chapter 8 Projective Algebraic Geometry

Projective Plane

The projective plane over \(\RR\) is denoted \(\PP^2(\RR)\), read Ahr Pee two. It is the union of a copy of \(\RR^2\) and line of infinity. The line of infinity is a collection of infinity points. Each infinity point is associated with a line in \(\RR^2\) of a certain direction, all lines parallel to that line meet at that point of infinity.

Projective Space and Projective Varieties

Affine variety is a component of a projective variety. One can, for example, decompose a projective variety as intersection of an affine variety and a set of points in projective space where the $i$-th coordinate of these points is nonzero.

Projective Algebraic Geometry Dictionary

A homogeneous ideal in a polynomial ring is an ideal where for each polynomial in the ideal, their homogeneous components are also in the ideal.

An homogeneous ideal is equivalent to saying its reduced Gröbner basis consists of homogeneous polynomials. (As for Gröbner, intuitively, the leading terms of polynomials of the ideal generate the same set of polynomials as the leading terms of the basis.)

Then it makes sense to define projective variety based on a given homogeneous ideal. Given a homogeneous ideal \(I \subset k[x_1, x_2, \ldots, x_n]\), a projective variety \(\VV(I)\) is the set of points in \(\PP^n(k)\) where all polynomials in \(I\) vanish, i.e., \(\VV(I)\) is the zero set of \(I\).

Hilbert, Die Theorie der algebraischen Zahlkörper

In the 1998 translation of the German original, starting from Satz 1, the ganze rationale Funktion is referred to as polynomial.

Kapitel I. Die algebraische Zahl und der Zahlkörper

Satz 1.

In jedem Körper \(k\) gibt es eine Zahl \(\vartheta\) derart, dass alle anderen Zahlen des Körpers ganze rationale Funktionen von \(\vartheta\) mit rationale Koeffizienten sind.


In any field \(k\) there is a number \(\vartheta\) such that all other numbers of the field are integral rational functions of \(\vartheta\) with rational coefficients.

\(\rmk\)

  • Number

    It refers to algebraic numbers, i.e. the ones that satisfy polynomial equation with rational coefficients according to Hilbert. (Coefficients can be in any base field other than rationals. \(k\) is the extension of the base field.)

  • Integral

    Basically, it means it is not a ratio; if it is then it is a trivial ratio with denominator \(1\).

  • \(\vartheta\) as generator of field

    If we regard \(\vartheta\) as the generator of the field (of degree \(m\) for example), any number field element, i.e., an algebraic number \(\alpha\) can be written as the $\QQ$-linear combination of independent powers of \(\vartheta\).

    \[\tag{S. 1, Eq. 1} \label{s1eq1} \alpha = r_1 + r_2 \vartheta + \cdots + r_{m-1} \vartheta^{m-1}. \]

    The highest power of \(\vartheta\) to appear in the linear combination is $(m-1)$-th power since \(\vartheta\) satisfies an $m$-th degree polynomial equation.

    Let \(\vartheta_1, \vartheta_2, \ldots, \vartheta_{m-1}\) be the other \(m-1\) roots of the polynomial equation \(\vartheta\) satisfies, by substituting these \(\vartheta_i\)’s in \eqref{s1eq1} respectively, we obtain \(m-1\) other \(\alpha_i\)’s, which we call the conjugates of \(\alpha\).

Satz 2.

Jede ganze ganzzahlige Funktion \(F\), d.h. jede ganze rationale Funktion mit ganzzahligen Koeffizienten von beliebig vielen ganzen Zahlen \(\alpha, \beta, \ldots, \kappa\) ist wiederum eine ganze Zahl.


Every integral whole number function \(F\), i.e., every integral rational function with integer coefficients of arbitrarily many integral number \(\alpha, \beta, \ldots, \kappa\) is again an integral number.

\(\rmk\)

  • Integral number or integral algebraic number

    An algebraic number, not only does it satisfy a polynomial equation with rational coefficients, but these rational coefficients are integral rational numbers, i.e., rational integers.

Satz 3.

Die Wurzeln einer Gleichung beliebigen Grades \(r\) von der Gestalt \[ \alpha^r + a_1 \alpha^{r - 1} + a_2 \alpha^{r-2} + \cdots + a_r = 0 \] sind stets ganze algebraische Zahlen, sobald die Koeffizienten \(a_1, a_2, \ldots, a_r\) ganze algebraischen Zahlen sind.


The roots of the equation of arbitrary degree \(r\) of the form \[ \alpha^r + a_1 \alpha^{r - 1} + a_2 \alpha^{r-2} + \cdots + a_r = 0 \] are always integral algebraic numbers, as long as the coefficients \(a_1, a_2, \ldots, a_r\) are integral algebraic numbers.

Satz 4.

Wenn eine ganze algebraische Zahl \(\alpha\) zugleich rational ist, so ist sie eine ganze rationale Zahl.


If an integral algebraic number \(\alpha\) is at the same time a rational number, it is also an integral rational number, i.e., a rational integer.

Satz 5.

In einem Zahlkörper $m$ten Grades gibt es stets \(m\) ganze Zahlen \(\omega_1, \omega_2, \ldots, \omega_m\) von der Beschaffenheit, dass jede andere ganze Zahl \(\omega\) des Körpers sich in der Gestalt \[ \omega = a_1 \omega_1 + a_2 \omega_2 + \cdots a_m \omega_m \] darstellen lässt, wo \(a_1, a_2, \ldots, a_m\) ganze rationale Zahlen sind.


In a field of degree \(m\), there are \(m\) integral numbers \(\omega_1, \omega_2, \ldots, \omega_m\) of the property, that every other integral number \(\omega\) of the field can be written in the form \[ \omega = a_1 \omega_1 + a_2 \omega_2 + \cdots a_m \omega_m, \] where \(a_1, a_2, \ldots, a_m\) are rational integers.

\(\rmk\)

  • Notation \(r_s\) in the proof

    In the proof, the notation \(r_s\)

    \[ r_s = \frac{|1, \alpha, \ldots, \omega, \ldots, \alpha_{m-1}|}{|1, \alpha, \ldots, \alpha_{s-1}, \ldots, \alpha_{m-1} |}. \]

    is given after \(m\) different linear equations are defined.

    \begin{align*} \omega &= r_1 + r_2 \alpha + \cdots + r_m \alpha^{m - 1} \\ \omega_1 &= r_1 + r_2 \alpha_1 + \cdots + r_m \alpha_1^{m - 1} \\ &\hspace{0.5em} \vdots \\ \omega_{m-1} &= r_1 + r_2 \alpha_{m-1} + \cdots + r_m \alpha_{m-1}^{m - 1}. \end{align*}

    Note the abbreviation \(r_s\) is really just Cramer’s rule for solving linear equations. For a system of linear equations \(Ax = b\), where \(A\) is a matrix, \(x, b\) are vectors, the $i$-th component of the solution \(x_i\) is given by

    \[ x_i = \frac{\det A_i}{\det A}, \]

    where matrix \(A_i\) is obtained by replacing the $i$-th column of the original \(A\) with \(b\) vector.

  • Norm, different and discriminant of an algebraic number

    The norm of an algebraic number \(\alpha\) in the field (of degree \(m\)) is the product of itself and its conjugates. The norm is a rational number.

    \[ n(\alpha) = \prod_{i=0}^{m-1} \alpha_i, \]

    with \(\alpha_0\) being \(\alpha\).

    The different is product of all linear differences \(\alpha - \alpha_i\), where \(\alpha_i\) is \(\alpha\)’s $i$-th conjugate. The different is an algebraic number in the field.

    \[ \delta (\alpha) = \prod_{i=0}^{m-1} (\alpha_0 - \alpha_i). \]

    The discriminant of \(\alpha\) is the same as the norm of the different except for a possible different sign. So the discriminant is also a rational number.

    \begin{align*} d(\alpha) &= \prod_{0\leq i< j \leq m-1} (\alpha_i - \alpha_j)^2 \\ &= \text{ Vandemonde matrix of $\alpha_i$'s} \\ &= (-1)^\frac{m(m-1)}2 n(\delta(\alpha)). \end{align*}

We can see that the above \(\omega_1, \ldots, \omega_m\) in the theorem form a basis of integers in the field of degree \(m\). The proof is constructive since we start with writing \(\omega\) as the $\QQ$-linear combination of independent powers of the generator \(\alpha\) of the field. Then we reach the expression

\[ \omega = \frac{A_1 + A_2 \alpha + \cdots + A_m \alpha^{m-1}}{d(\alpha)}, \]

where \(A_i\)’s are rational integers.

Lastly, different bases of integers in \(k\) differ by a transformation matrix with rational integer entries whose determinant is \(\pm 1\).

Kapitel II. Die Ideale des Zahlkörpers

Satz 6.

In einem Ideal \(\gotha\) gibt es stets \(m\) Zahlen \(\iota_1, \iota_2, \ldots, \iota_m\) von der Art, dass eine jede andere Zahl des Ideals gleich einer linearen Kombination derselben von der Gestalt

\[ \iota = l_1 \iota_1 + \cdots l_m \iota_m \]

ist, wo \(l_1, \ldots, l_m\) ganze rationale Zahlen sind.


In an ideal \(\gotha\) there are always \(m\) numbers \(\iota_1, \iota_2, \ldots, \iota_m\) in the manner, that every other number of the ideal is a linear combination of these numbers of the form

\[ \iota = l_1 \iota_1 + \cdots l_m \iota_m, \]

where \(l_1, \ldots, l_m\) are integral rational numbers, i.e., rational integers.

\(\rmk\)

  • Ideal \(\gotha\)

    Ideals according to Hilbert are about integral algebraic numbers. It says an ideal \(\gotha\) in \(k\) has the property that it is made of integral algebraic numbers of \(k\) and any $Λ$-linear combination is still in \(\gotha\), where \(\Lambda = \{ \lambda : \lambda \text{ integral algebraic numbers in } k \}\).

We see that the \(m\) \(\iota_i\)’s form the basis of the ideal \(\gotha\). Similar to the case of bases of integers of a field, the bases of an ideal differ also by a transformation matrix with rational integer entries whose determinant is \(\pm 1\).

\(\voka\)

  • enthalten : contain
  • falls eine Verwechselung ausgeschlossen erscheint : if a mistake seems impossible
  • betreffend: regarding, concerning
  • Ergründung : explanation
  • Verdienst : due to (someone’s work)
  • aufgestellt : aufstellen, formieren, bilden

Hilfssatz 1.

Ein Ideal \(\gothi\) ist nur durch eine endliche Anzahl von Idealen teilbar.


An ideal \(\gothi\) is only divisible by finite number of ideals.

\(\rmk\)

  • Congruence

    Given ideal \(\gotha = (\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r)\), each number \(\alpha_i\) of the ideal \(\gotha\) is called congruent to \(0\) modulo ideal \(\gotha\),

    \[ \alpha \equiv 0 \bmod \gotha. \]

  • $ (\gotha, \gothb) $ and \(\gotha \gothb\)

    Given two ideals \(\gotha = (\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r)\) and \(\gothb = (\beta_1, \ldots, \beta_s)\), the combination of generators of both ideals generate a new ideal

    \[ (\gotha, \gothb) = (\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r, \beta_1, \ldots, \beta_s). \]

    The product ideal of both ideals \(\gotha\) and \(\gothb\) is generated by \(\alpha_i \beta_j\)’s, \(1 \leq i \leq r, 1 \leq j \leq s\).

    \[ \gotha \gothb = (\alpha_1 \beta_1, \ldots, \alpha_i \beta_j, \ldots, \alpha_r \beta_s). \]

  • Primality and coprimality

    Divisibility can be defined after the product of ideals. If \(\gothc = \gotha \gothb\) then \(\gothc\) is divisible through \(\gotha\) or \(\gothb\).

    An ideal (not \((1)\)) which has no other divisors than \((1)\) and itself is called a prime ideal.

    Coprime ideals do not share any ideal divisors other than \((1)\).

    As for coprimality, there are two types:

    • An integral number \(\alpha\) is relatively prime to another integral number \(\beta\) if the two ideals principal ideals \((\alpha)\) and \((\beta)\) generated by \(\alpha\) and \(\beta\) are coprime.
    • An integral number \(\alpha\) is relatively prime to another ideal \(\gothi\) if the ideal \((\alpha)\) generated by \(\alpha\) is relative prime to ideal \(\gothi\).

Satz 7.

Ein jedes Ideal \(\gothi\) lässt sich stets auf eine und nur auf eine Weise als Produkt von Primidealen darstellen.


Every ideal \(\gothi\) can always be represented in one way and only one way as product of prime ideals.

\(\voka\)

  • auseinandersetzen : erklären, deutlich machen
  • geschaffenen : p.p. schaffen, made
  • tritt deutlicher hervor : step out clearly
  • ableiten : (math) derive
  • wesentlich : essential

Hilfssatz 2.

Wenn die Koeffizienten \(\alpha_1, \alpha_2, \ldots, \beta_1, \beta_2, \ldots\) der beiden ganzen Funktionen einer Veränderlichen \(x\)

\begin{align*} F(x) &= \alpha_1 x^r + \alpha_2 x^{r-1} + \cdots, \\ G(x) &= \beta_1 x^s + \beta_2 x^{s-1} + \cdots \end{align*}

ganze algebraische Zahlen sind und die Koeffizienten \(\gamma_1, \gamma_2, \ldots\) des Produktes beider Funktionen

\[ F(x)G(x) = \gamma_1 x^{r+s} + \gamma_2 x^{r+s-1} + \cdots \]

sämtlich durch die ganze Zahl \(\omega\) teilbar sind, so ist auch jede der Zahlen \(\alpha_1 \beta_1, \alpha_1 \beta_2, \ldots, \alpha_2 \beta_1, \alpha_2 \beta_2, \ldots\) durch \(\omega\) teilbar.


If the coefficients \(\alpha_1, \alpha_2, \ldots, \beta_1, \beta_2, \ldots\) of two integral functions in one variable \(x\)

\begin{align*} F(x) &= \alpha_1 x^r + \alpha_2 x^{r-1} + \cdots, \\ G(x) &= \beta_1 x^s + \beta_2 x^{s-1} + \cdots \end{align*}

are all algebraic numbers and the coefficients \(\gamma_1, \gamma_2, \ldots\) of the product of both functions

\[ F(x)G(x) = \gamma_1 x^{r+s} + \gamma_2 x^{r+s-1} + \cdots \]

are all divisible by an integral number \(\omega\), then every one of the numbers \(\alpha_1 \beta_1, \alpha_1 \beta_2, \ldots, \alpha_2 \beta_1, \alpha_2 \beta_2, \ldots\) is also divisible by \(\omega\).

Satz 8.

Zu jedem vorgelegten Ideale \(\gotha = (\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r)\) lässt sich stets ein Ideal \(\gothb\) so finden, dass das Produkt \(\gotha \gothb\) ein Hauptideal wird.


For every given ideal \(\gotha = (\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r)\) we can find an ideal \(\gothb\) such that the product \(\gotha \gothb\) is a principal ideal.

\(\rmk\)

  • \(FR = nU\) in the proof

    The proof starts with the “forms” (Formen)

    \[ F = \alpha_1 u_1 + \alpha_2 u_2 + \cdots + \alpha_r u_r .\]

    The \(u_i\)’s are really just rational integers. By Satz 6, \(\gotha\) is an ideal then \(F\) is rational integer linear combination of \(\alpha_i\)’s. \(F\) is a form a.k.a. ganze ganzzahlige Funktion.

    \(R\) is defined as the product of conjugate forms; conjugate forms are constructed by way of substituting \(\alpha_i\)’s conjugates \(\alpha_i^{(m-1)}\) in \(\alpha_i\)’s slots in \(F\).

    Then \(FR\) is some rational integer linear combination of \(\alpha_i\)’s and their conjugates; \(n\) is the greatest common divisor of these integers.

  • Proof in 1998 English translation

    It is different from Hilbert and other things might be going on there.

Satz 9.

Wenn die drei Ideale \(\gotha, \gothb, \gothc\) der Gleichung \(\gotha \gothc = \gothb \gothc\) genügen, so ist \(\gotha = \gothb\).


If three ideals \(\gotha, \gothb, \gothc\) satisfy the equality \(\gotha \gothc = \gothb \gothc\), then \(\gotha = \gothb\).

Satz 10.

Wenn alle Zahlen eines Ideals \(\gothc \equiv 0\) nach dem Ideal \(\gotha\) sind, so ist \(\gothc\) durch \(\gotha\) teilbar.


If all numbers of the ideal \(\gothc\) is congruent to \(0\) modulo the ideal \(\gotha\), then \(\gothc\) is divisible by \(\gotha\).

Satz 11.

Wenn das Produkt zweier Ideale \(\gotha \gothb\) durch das Primideal \(\gothp\) teilbar ist, so ist wenigstens eines der Ideale \(\gotha\) und \(\gothb\) durch \(\gothp\) teilbar.


If the product of two ideals \(\gotha \gothb\) is divisible by a prime ideal \(\gothp\), then at least one of the ideals \(\gotha\) and \(\gothb\) is divisible by \(\gothp\).

\(\rmk\)

  • Würde das Ideal \((\gotha, \gothp)\) zugleich in \(\gothp\) aufgehendes Ideal sein

    Although it is not mentioned up to this point, the notation \((\gotha, \gothp)\) is used to denote the greatest common divisor for a reason. Then it is natural to think of \((\gotha, \gothp)\) as a divisor as either \(\gotha\) or \(\gothp\). The German “aufgehen in + Dat.” means divide without remainder, i.e., be a divisor.

\(\voka\)

  • Voraussetzung : assumption, condition
  • erhalten : obtain, get

Satz 12.

Ein jedes Ideal \(\gothi\) des Körpers \(k\) kann als größter gemeinsamer Teiler zweier ganzen Zahlen \(\kappa, \rho\) dargestellt werden.


Every ideal \(\gothi\) in field \(k\) can be written in terms of the greatest common divisor of two integral numbers \(\kappa, \rho\).

\(\rmk\)

  • Proof in 1998 English translation

    It is different from Hilbert and other things might be going on there.

\(\voka\)

  • bricht notwendig ab : abbrechen, break, stop; notwendig, necessarily
  • jedenfalls : anyway
  • bedingen : bestimmen, erfordern

Satz 13.

Der Inhalt des Produktes zweier Formen ist gleich dem Produkte ihrer Inhalte.


The content of product of two forms is equal to the product of their contents.

\(\rmk\)

  • Form \(F\)

    A form is an algebraic-integer-linear combination of several variables. For a given form \(F = \alpha_1 u + \alpha_2 v + \cdots\), we can construct conjugate forms $F’, F’’, \ldots $ of \(F\) through substituting \(\alpha_i\)’s conjugates in lieu of \(\alpha_i\)’s in \(F\). The product of \(F\) and its conjugate forms takes the form

    \[ n U(u, v, \ldots) \]

    for the same reason discussed in entry Satz 8. \(n\) is called the norm of the form \(F\).

    If the norm of \(F\) is \(1\), then \(F\) is a unit form.

    Two forms are called content equal if their quotient equals the quotient of two unit forms, denoted e.g., \(F\simeq G\). In particular, every unit form is content equal to \(1\).

    Divisibility is defined after this notion of content equality. Since if \(H \simeq FG\) then \(H\) is divisible by \(F\) or \(G\).

  • Form \(F\) and ideal \(\gotha\)

    A form is in a nutshell a polynomial in several variables whose coefficients are algebraic integers. So are the generators of an ideal. In this way they are closely related. And the given either one of them, by matching polynomial coefficients with generators of an ideal, one can recover the other. Therefore the associated ideal of a form is called the content of the form.

\(\voka\)

  • Begriffsbildung : concept
  • ursprünglich : the initial
  • Beziehung : relation (to)
  • Bemerkung : remark, comment
  • Glied : member; (math) term
  • zunächst … und dann … : first, … then
  • nach absteigenden Potenzen : by descending powers
  • u.s.f. : und so fort; and so on
  • übrig : remaining
  • somit : thus
  • Behauptung : (math) claim; assertion
  • engerem : eng, narrow

Satz 14.

Wenn \(F\) eine vorgelegte Form ist, so lässt dich dazu stets eine Form finden derart, dass \(FR\) einer ganzen Zahl inhaltsgleich ist.


If \(F\) is a given form, then we can always find a form \(R\) in the manner that \(FR\) is content equal to an integral number, i.e., algebraic integer.

\(\rmk\)

Satz 14 is a parallel to Satz 8.

Satz 15.

Wenn das Produkt zweier Formen durch eine Primform \(P\) teilbar ist, so ist wenigstens eine der beiden Formen durch \(P\) teilbar.


If the product of two forms is divisible by a prime form \(P\), then at least one of the two forms is divisible by \(P\).

\(\rmk\)

Satz 15 is a parallel to Satz 11.

Satz 16.

Jede Form ist im Sinne der Inhaltsgleichheit auf eine und nur auf eine Weise als Produkt von Primformen darstellbar.


Every form is in the sense of content equality, written in one and only one way as the product of prime forms.

\(\rmk\)

Satz 16 is a parallel to Satz 7. See Satz 13 for details of content equality.

\(\voka\)

  • erforderlich : necessary, required
  • Grundgedanke : basic idea
  • Verallgemeinerung : generalisation
  • desjenigen : dasjenigen, that, those; the

Kapitel III. Die Norm eines Ideals und ihre Eigenschaften

Satz 17.

Die Norm eines Primideals \(\gothp\) ist eine Potenz der durch \(\gothp\) teilbaren rationalen Primzahl \(p\).


The norm of a prime ideal \(\gothp\) is a power of rational prime \(p\) divisible by \(\gothp\).

\(\rmk\)

  • Norm of an ideal \(\gotha\)

    We talk about whether an integral number, i.e., algebraic integer is divisible by an ideal \(\gotha\). The number of incongruent such integral numbers is called the norm of the ideal \(\gotha\), denoted \(n(\gotha)\).

  • Power of \(p\)

    Satz 17 basically is counting the number of incongruent algebraic integers modulo prime ideal \(\gothp\), and it turns out there are a power of a rational prime \(p^f\) of them. We don’t necessarily say this power \(p^f\) is divisible by prime ideal \(\gothp\).

    The exponent \(f\) of power \(p^f\) is called the degree of the prime ideal \(\gothp\).

\(\voka\)

  • unabhängig : independent of
  • bestehen : exist
  • beträgt : betragen, amount to
  • überdies : besides

Satz 18.

Die Norm des Produktes zweier Ideale \(\gotha \gothb\) ist gleich dem Produkt ihrer Normen.


The norm of the product of two ideals \(\gotha \gothb\) is the equal to the product of their norms.

\(\voka\)

  • umfasst mithin \(n(\gotha) n(\gothb)\) Zahlen : consists of \(n(\gotha) n(\gothb)\) integers

Satz 19.

Ist

\begin{align*} \iota_1 &= a_{11} \omega_1 + \cdots + a_{1m} \omega_m, \\ &\hspace{.5em} \vdots \\ \iota_m &= a_{m1} \omega_1 + \cdots + a_{m1} \omega_m \end{align*}

eine Basis des Ideals \(\gotha\), so ist seine Norm \(n(\gotha)\) gleich dem absoluten Betrage der Determinante der Koeffizienten \(a\).


Let

\begin{align*} \iota_1 &= a_{11} \omega_1 + \cdots + a_{1m} \omega_m, \\ &\hspace{.5em} \vdots \\ \iota_m &= a_{m1} \omega_1 + \cdots + a_{m1} \omega_m \end{align*}

be a basis of ideal \(\gotha\), then its norm \(n(\gotha)\) is equal to the absolute value of the determinant of coefficient matrix \((a_{ij})\), \(1 \leq i, j \leq m\).

\(\voka\)

  • leuchtet die Umkehrung ein : einleuchten; the converse makes sense (is obvious)
  • Zusammenhang : connection

Satz 20.

Ist \(F\) eine Form mit dem Inhalt \(\gotha\), so ist die Norm der Form \(F\) gleich der Norm des Ideals \(\gotha\), d.h. \(n(F) = n(\gotha)\). Insbesondere ist die Norm einer ganzen Zahl \(\alpha\) dem absoluten Betrage nach stets gleich der Norm des Hauptideals \(\gotha = (\alpha)\).


Let \(F\) be a form with content \(\gotha\), then the norm of \(F\) is equal to the norm of ideal \(\gotha\), i.e., \(n(F) = n(\gotha)\). In particular, the norm of an integral number \(\alpha\) is always equal to the norm of the principal ideal \(\gotha = (\alpha)\) generated by \(\alpha\).

\(\rmk\)

  • Norm of an ideal and norm of an algebraic number

    The original definition of norm of an ideal (See Satz 17) can be bridged to the definition of norm of an algebraic number (See Satz 5).

    Given an ideal \(\gotha = (\alpha_1, \alpha_2, \ldots)\), recall that \(\alpha_i\) is a $\QQ$-linear combination of powers of a generator \(\vartheta\) of the field \(k\) of degree \(m\). (See Satz 1). There are \(m-1\) other \(\vartheta\)’s that are also the roots of the polynomial equation that \(\vartheta\) solves, say, they are \(\vartheta', \vartheta'', \ldots\). Replacing \(\vartheta\) with \(\vartheta', \vartheta'', \ldots\) in the $\QQ$-linear combination of \(\vartheta\) powers for \(\alpha_i\), we get \(\alpha_i\)’s conjugates in terms of new \(\vartheta\)’s.

    In this way, we get conjugate ideals of \(\gotha\) as

    \begin{align*} \gotha' = &(\alpha_1', \alpha_2', \ldots) \\ \gotha'' = &(\alpha_1'', \alpha_2'', \ldots) \\ &\hspace{0.5em}\vdots \end{align*}

    By Satz 18 through Satz 20, the norm of ideal \(\gotha\) is the same as the product of itself and its conjugate ideals, which is a good resemblance to the norm of an algebraic number.

\(\voka\)

  • im Gegenteil : on the contrary
  • Weghebung des Faktors : cancel factor
  • zusammengesetzten : be made up of; composite
  • entspringt, entspricht : entsprichen, have its source in; entsprechen, correspond to
  • Umstände : circumstances
  • fähig : (is) able (to)

Satz 21.

In einem jeden Ideal \(\gothi\) lassen sich stets zwei Zahlen finden, deren Normen die Norm des Ideals \(\gothi\) zum größten gemeinsamen Teiler haben.


In every ideal \(\gothi\) we can always find two numbers, the greatest common divisor of whose norms is the norm of the ideal \(\gothi\).

Satz 22.

Ist \(\gothp\) ein Primideal vom Grade \(f\), so genügt jede ganze Zahl \(\omega\) des Körpers \(k\) der Kongruenz

\[ \omega^{p^f} \equiv \omega \bmod \gothp. \]


Let \(\gothp\) be a prime ideal of degree \(f\), then every integral number \(\omega\) in field \(k\) satisfies the congruence

\[ \omega^{p^f} \equiv \omega \bmod \gothp. \]

\(\voka\)

  • Schluss : conclude; (math) interference
  • Fermat’schen Lehrsatz ist leicht auf die Körpertheorie übertragbar : Fermat’s theorem can be carried over to field theory.

Satz 23.

Die Anzahl aller derjenigen nach einem Ideale \(\gotha\) einander incongruenten Zahlen, welche prim zu \(\gotha\) sind, ist

\[ \varphi(\gotha) = n(\gotha) \left( 1 - \dfrac{1}{n(\gothp_1)} \right)\left( 1 - \dfrac{1}{n(\gothp_2)} \right) \cdots \left( 1 - \dfrac{1}{n(\gothp_r)} \right), \]

wo \(\gothp_1, \gothp_2, \ldots, \gothp_r\) die sämtlichen in \(\gotha\) aufgehenden und von einander verschiedenen Primideale bedeuten.


The number of incongruent numbers modulo ideal \(\gotha\), which are relatively prime to \(\gotha\), is

\[ \varphi(\gotha) = n(\gotha) \left( 1 - \dfrac{1}{n(\gothp_1)} \right)\left( 1 - \dfrac{1}{n(\gothp_2)} \right) \cdots \left( 1 - \dfrac{1}{n(\gothp_r)} \right), \]

where \(\gothp_1, \gothp_2, \ldots, \gothp_r\) are all the prime ideals that divide \(\gotha\) and from each other they are different.

\(\rmk\)

  • Euler’s \(\varphi\) function of ideals

    For relatively prime ideals \(\gotha, \gothb\), Euler’s \(\varphi\) function is multiplicative, i.e.,

    \[ \varphi(\gotha \gothb) = \varphi(\gotha) \varphi(\gothb). \]

    Another formula of \(\varphi\) function is

    \[ \sum_{\gotht\, \mid \, \gotha} \varphi(\gotht) = n(\gotha). \]

Satz 24.

Jede zu dem Ideal \(\gotha\) prime ganze Zahl \(\omega\) genügt der Kongruenz

\[ \omega^{\varphi(\gotha)} \equiv 1 \bmod \gotha .\]


Every integral number \(\omega\) relatively prime to ideal \(\gotha\) satisfies the congruence

\[ \omega^{\varphi(\gotha)} \equiv 1 \bmod \gotha .\]

\(\rmk\)

  • An example

    Let \(\omega\) be an integral number in field \(k\). If \(\omega\) is not divisible by a prime ideal \(\gothp\) of degree of \(f\), then \(\omega\) satisfies the congruence

    \[ \omega^{p^f(p^f-1)} \equiv 1 \bmod \gothp^2. \]

Satz 25.

Wenn \(\gotha_1, \ldots, \gotha_r\) Ideale bedeuten, von denen stets je zwei zu einander prim sind, und wenn \(\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r\) beliebige ganze Zahlen sind, so gibt es eine ganze Zahl \(\omega\), die den Kongruenzen

\begin{align*} \omega &\equiv \alpha_1 \bmod \gotha_1, \\ &\hspace{0.5em} \vdots \\ \omega &\equiv \alpha_r \bmod \gotha_r \end{align*}

genügt.


Let \(\gotha_1, \ldots, \gotha_r\) be pairwise relatively prime ideals, and let \(\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r\) be arbitrary integral numbers, then there is an integral number \(\omega\) which satisfies the congruences

\begin{align*} \omega &\equiv \alpha_1 \bmod \gotha_1, \\ &\hspace{0.5em} \vdots \\ \omega &\equiv \alpha_r \bmod \gotha_r. \end{align*}

Satz 26.

Eine Kongruenz $r$ten nach dem Primideal \(\gothp\) von der Gestalt

\[ \alpha x^r + \alpha_1 x^{r-1} + \cdots + \alpha_r \equiv 0 \bmod \gothp, \]

wo \(\alpha, \alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r\) ganze Zahlen in \(k\) sind, besitzt höchstens \(r\) nach \(\gothp\) einander incongruente Wurzeln.


An $r$-th degree congruence equation modulo prime ideal \(\gothp\) of the form

\[ \alpha x^r + \alpha_1 x^{r-1} + \cdots + \alpha_r \equiv 0 \bmod \gothp, \]

where \(\alpha, \alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_r\) are integral numbers in \(k\), has at most \(r\) incongruent roots modulo \(\gothp\).

Satz 27.

Bedeutet \(\gothp\) ein in der rationalen Primzahl \(p\) aufgehendes Primideal, und ist \(\alpha\) eine Wurzel der Kongruenz

\[ a x^r + a_1 x^{r-1} + \cdots + a_r \equiv 0 \bmod \gothp, \]

wo \(a, a_1, \ldots, a_r\) ganze rationale Zahlen bedeuten, so ist auch \(\alpha^p\) eine Wurzel dieser Kongruenz.


Let \(\gothp\) be a prime ideal dividing a rational prime \(p\), and let \(\alpha\) be a root of the congruence

\[ a x^r + a_1 x^{r-1} + \cdots + a_r \equiv 0 \bmod \gothp, \]

where \(a, a_1, \ldots, a_r\) are rational integers, then \(\alpha^p\) is also a root of this congruence.

\(\rmk\)

  • Ideal dividing a number

    It makes sense to say a rational prime \(p\) is divisible by a prime ideal \(\gothp\) since it simply means \(p\) is a of the generators of the prime ideal \(\gothp\), e.g., rational prime \(3\) belongs to prime ideal \((3, 2+\sqrt{-5})\).

Satz 28.

Es gibt \(\Phi(p^f-1)\) Primitivzahlen für das Primideal \(\gothp\), wo \(\Phi(p^f-1)\) die Anzahl der einander incongruenten, zu \(p^f-1\) primen rationalen Reste nach \(p^f-1\) bezeichnet.


There exist \(\Phi(p^f-1)\) primitive roots for prime ideal \(\gothp\), where \(\Phi(p^f-1)\) is the number of pairwise modulo \(p^f-1\) incongruent rational residues that are relative prime to \(p^f-1\).

\(\voka\)

  • Nachweis : proof; beweisen, to show
  • dagegen : jedoch, andererseits, however

Satz 29.

Ist \(\gothp\) ein beliebig vorgelegtes Primideal des Körpers \(k\), so kann man stets in \(k\) eine Zahl \(\rho\) finden von der Art, dass jede andere ganze Zahl des Körpers einer gewissen ganzen Funktion von \(\rho\) mit ganzen rationalen Koeffizienten kongruent ist nach einer beliebig hohen Potenz \(\gothp^l\) des Primideals \(\gothp\).


Let \(\gothp\) be an arbitrary given prime ideal in field \(k\). Then we can always find a number \(\rho\) in \(k\) in the manner, that every other integral number of the field is congruent to some integral function (polynomial) of \(\rho\) with rational integer coefficients modulo arbitrary high powers \(\gothp^l\) of prime ideal \(\gothp\).

\(\voka\)

  • obigen : above (mentioned)
  • wegen : because of
  • ersichtlich : evident
  • erschöpften : wear out, exhaust

Satz 30.

Wenn ein Primideal \(\gothp\) vom $f$ten Grade vorgelegt ist, so gibt es im Körper \(k\) stets eine ganze Zahl \(\rho\) von der im Satz 29 verlangten Eigenschaft und überdies von der Art, dass man

\[ \gothp = (p, P(\rho)) \]

hat, wo \(P(\rho)\) eine ganze Funktion $f$ten Grades von \(\rho\) mit ganzen rationalen Koeffizienten ist.


Let \(\gothp\) of degree \(f\) be a given prime ideal. Then there always exists in field \(k\) an integral number \(\rho\) of the desired property as in Satz 29 and further in the manner, that we have

\[ \gothp = (p, P(\rho)), \]

where \(P(\rho)\) is an integral function (polynomial) of degree \(f\) in \(\rho\) with rational integer coefficients.

Kapitel IV. Die Diskriminante des Körpers und ihre Teiler

Satz 31.

Die Diskriminante \(d\) des Zahlkörpers \(k\) enthält alle und nur diejenigen rationalen Primzahlen als Faktoren, welche durch das Quadrat eines Primideals teilbar sind.


The discriminant \(d\) of number field \(k\) contains all and only those rational primes as its factors, which are divisible by the square of a prime ideal.

\(\rmk\)

  • Discriminant of a field \(k\)

    Given a basis \(\omega_1, \ldots, \omega_m\) of a field \(k\), the discriminant of \(k\) is defined through the basis and \(\omega_i\)’s conjugates as

    \[ d = \left| \begin{matrix} \omega_1 & \cdots & \omega_m \\ \omega_1' & \cdots & \omega_m' \\ \hspace{0.5em} \vdots & \hspace{0.5em} \vdots & \hspace{0.5em} \vdots \\ \omega_1^{(m-1)} & \cdots & \omega_m^{(m-1)} \end{matrix} \right|^2 . \]

    The discriminant is a rational integer.

  • Fundamental form

    Basis as above, the form in \(m\) variables \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) with basis components as its coefficients

    \[ \xi = \omega_1 u_1 + \cdots + \omega_m u_m \]

    is called the fundamental form of the field \(k\).

    Now an equation in \(x\)

    \[ \prod_{i=0}^{m-1} (x - \omega_1^{(i)} u_1 - \cdots - \omega_m^{(i)} u_m ) = 0 \]

    would become

    \[ \tag{S. 31, Eq. 1} \label{s31eq1} x^m + U_1 x^{m-1} + U_2 x^{m-2} + \cdots + U_m = 0, \]

    where \(U_1, \ldots, U_m\) are some polynomials in \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) with rational integer coefficients. The equation in \(x\) in \eqref{s31eq1} is called fundamental equation.

\(\voka\)

  • erheblich : considerably
  • verursacht : verursachen, cause, give rise to
  • ergänzt : ergänzen, add to, complete
  • annehmen : accept, assume
  • Zerlegung : decomposition, (math) factorization
  • eben : only just
  • neben … noch … : besides … still …

Satz 32.

Wenn zwei ganzzahlige Funktionen \(X\) und \(Y\) von \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\) nach der rationalen Primzahl \(p\) keinen gemeinsamen Teiler in \(x\) haben, so gibt es eine ganzzahlige, nach \(p\) nicht der \(0\) kongruente Funktion \(U\) von \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) allein, so das man

\[ U \equiv AX + BY \bmod p \]

hat, wo \(A\) und \(B\) geeignete ganzzahlige Funktionen von \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\) sind.


If two integer polynomials \(X\) and \(Y\) in \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\) modulo rational prime \(p\) have no common divisors in \(x\), then there exists an integer polynomial \(U\) that is modulo \(p\) not congruent to \(0\), only in \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\), such that we have

\[ U \equiv AX + BY \bmod p, \]

where \(A\) und \(B\) are suitable integer polynomials in \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\).

\(\rmk\)

  • Divisibility of integer polynomial modulo \(p\)

    The divisibility among integer polynomials is defined after congruence equation modulo a rational prime \(p\), i.e., given three integer polynomials \(X, Y, Z\) in \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\), writing

    \[ Z \equiv XY \bmod p,\]

    we say \(Z\) is modulo \(p\) divisible by \(X\) or \(Y\).

\(\voka\)

  • gewöhnlich : normal, usual
  • geeignete : suitable

Hilfssatz 3.

Wenn \(\gothp\) ein in \(p\) aufgehendes Primideal $f$ten Grades bezeichnet, so gibt es stets nach \(p\) eine Primfunktion \(\Pi(x; u_1, \ldots, u_m)\) vom $f$ten Grade in \(x\), welche, wenn man an Stelle von \(x\) die Fundamentalform \(\xi\) setzt, folgende Eigenschaften besitzt: die Koeffizienten der Potenzen und Produkte von \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) in der Funktion \(\Pi(\xi; u_1, \ldots, u_m)\) sind durch \(\gothp\), aber nicht sämtlich durch \(\gothp^2\) und auch nicht sämtlich durch ein von \(\gothp\) verschiedenes, in \(p\) aufgehendes Primideal teilbar.


Let \(\gothp\) be a \(p\) dividing prime ideal of degree \(f\). Then there always exists modulo \(p\) a prime function \(\Pi (x;u_1, \ldots, u_m)\) of degree \(f\) in \(x\), which has the following property when \(x\) is replaced with the fundamental form \(\xi\): The coefficients of the powers and products of \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) in the function \(\Pi (\xi;u_1, \ldots, u_m)\) is modulo \(\gothp\) divisible, but not modulo \(\gothp^2\) divisible and also not divisible modulo any \(p\) dividing prime ideals other than \(\gothp\).

\(\rmk\)

  • Prime function

    A prime function \(P\) modulo \(p\), a.k.a. integer polynomial modulo \(p\), is an integer polynomial modulo \(p\) divisible by no integer polynomials other than integer polynomials modulo \(p\) congruent to a rational prime, or \(P\) itself.

  • \(P(x)\) is prime function modulo \(p\)

    \(\rho\) as in Satz 29 and Satz 30, \(P(x)\) is an integer polynomial of degree \(f\) such that \(\gothp = (p, P(\rho))\) as in Satz 30. Had \(P(x)\) not been a prime function, it would be modulo \(\gothp\) congruent to an integer polynomial of degree lower than \(f\).

    \(P(\rho) \equiv 0 \bmod \gothp\) further by Satz 27, \(\rho, \rho^2, \ldots, \rho^{p^{f-1}}\) are \(f\) different incongruent roots for congruence \(P(x)\equiv 0 \bmod \gothp\).

\(\voka\)

  • gehörige : suitable, proper
  • umso mehr : cf. umso weniger

Hilfssatz 4.

Jede ganzzahlige Funktion \(\Phi(x;u_1, \ldots, u_m)\), welche identisch in \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) nach \(\gothp\) dem Wert \(0\) kongruent wird, sobald man für \(x\) die Fundamentalform \(\xi\) einsetzt, ist nach \(p\) durch \(\Pi(x; u_1, \ldots, u_m)\) teilbar.


Every integer polynomial \(\Phi(x;u_1, \ldots, u_m)\), which is identically congruent to \(0\) modulo \(\gothp\) in \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\), as soon as we replace \(x\) with fundamental form \(\xi\), is modulo \(p\) divisible by \(\Pi(x; u_1, \ldots, u_m)\).

\(\voka\)

  • sobald : as soon as
  • einsetzt : einsetzen, ansetzen
  • ergeben : result in

Hilfssatz 5.

Ist \(\Phi\) eine ganzzahlige Funktion von \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\), welche identisch in \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) nach \(\gothp^e\) dem Wert \(0\) kongruent wird, wenn man für \(x\) die Fundamentalform \(\xi\) einsetzt, so muss notwendig \(\Phi\) nach \(p\) durch \(\Pi^e\) teilbar sein.


Let \(\Phi\) be an integer polynomial of \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\), which is modulo \(\gothp\) congruent to \(0\) in \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) if \(x\) is replaced with fundamental form \(\xi\). It is necessary to have \(\Phi\) is modulo \(p\) divisible by \(\Pi^e\).

Satz 33.

Ist die Zerlegung der rationalen Primzahl \(p\) in Primideale durch die Formel \(p = \gothp^e \gothp'^{e'} \cdots\) gegeben, so gestattet die linke Seite \(F\) der Fundamentalgleichung im Sinn der Kongruenz nach \(p\) die Darstellung

\[ F \equiv \Pi^e \Pi'^{e'} \cdots \bmod p, \]

wo $Π, Π’, \ldots $ gewisse verschiedene Primfunktionen von \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\) nach \(p\) bedeuten; überdies ist, wenn

\[ F \equiv \Pi^e \Pi'^{e'} \cdots + pG \]

gesetzt wird, \(G\) eine ganzzahlige Funktion der Veränderlichen \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\), welche nach \(p\) durch keine der Primfunktionen \(\Pi, \Pi', \ldots\) teilbar ist.


Let the decomposition of rational prime \(p\) into prime ideals be the given form \(p = \gothp^e \gothp'^{e'} \cdots\), then the left hand side of fundamental equation in the sense of congruence modulo \(p\) admits the representation

\[ F \equiv \Pi^e \Pi'^{e'} \cdots \bmod p, \]

where $Π, Π’, \ldots $ denote some different prime functions in \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\) modulo \(p\); moreover if we set

\[ F = \Pi^e \Pi'^{e'} \cdots + pG, \]

then \(G\) is an integer polynomial of variables \(x, u_1, \ldots, u_m\), which modulo \(p\) is not divisible by prime functions \(\Pi, \Pi', \ldots\).

Satz 34.

Die aus der Fundamentalgleichung sich ergebende Kongruenz $m$ten Grades

\[ F(x; u_1, \ldots, u_m) \equiv 0 \bmod p \]

ist zugleich die Kongruenz niedrigsten Grades mit ganzen rationale Koeffizienten, welcher die Fundamentalform \(\xi\), für \(x\) eingesetzt, nach \(p\) genügt.


The congruence of degree \(m\) resulted from fundamental equation

\[ F(x; u_1, \ldots, u_m) \equiv 0 \bmod p \]

is the congruence of the lowest degree with rational integer coefficients, which modulo \(p\) the fundamental form \(\xi\) satisfies replacing \(x\).

\(\voka\)

  • befriedigt : satisfies

Satz 35.

Der größte Zahlenfaktor von der Diskriminante der Fundamentalgleichung ist gleich der Diskriminante des Körpers.


The greatest number factor of the discriminant of the fundamental equation is the same as the discriminant of the field.

\(\voka\)

  • durch Quadrieren dieser Beziehung : through taking squares of the relation
  • Auflösung der Gleichung : solving the equation

Satz 36.

Jede ganze Zahl des Körper \(k\) ist gleich einer ganzen rationalen Funktion $(m-1)$ten Grades der Fundamentalform \(\xi\), und zwar sind die Koeffizienten dieser Funktion ganzzahlige Funktionen von \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\), dividiert durch die rationale Einheitsform \(U\).


Every integral number of the field \(k\) is the same as an integer Polynomial of degree \((m-1)\) of the fundamental form \(\xi\), and namely the coefficients of this integer polynomial are whole numbered functions of \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\), which are divisible by rational unit form \(U\).

Satz 37.

Die Norm der Differenten des Körpers ist gleich der Diskriminante des Körpers.


The norm of the different of a field is the same as the discriminant of the field.

Kapitel V. Der Relativkörper

Satz 38.

Die Relativdiskriminante des Körpers \(K\) in Bezug auf den Unterkörper \(k\) ist gleich der Relativnorm der Relativdifferente von \(K\), d.h.

\[ D_k = N_k (\gothD_k). \]


The relative discriminant of a field \(K\) with respect to a subfield \(k\) is equal to the relative norm of the relative different of \(K\), i.e.,

\[ D_k = N_k (\gothD_k). \]

\(\voka\)

  • in Bezug auf (+ Akk.) (hinsichtlich) : as far as … goes (oder is concerned)

Satz 39.

Bedeuten \(D\) und \(d\) die Diskriminanten des Oberkörpers \(K\) und des Unterkörpers \(k\) und bezeichnet \(n(D_k)\) die Norm der Relativdiskriminante \(D_k\), genommen im Körper \(k\), so ist

\[ D = d^r n(D_k). \]


Let \(D\) and \(d\) be the discriminants of the extension field \(K\) and the subfield \(k\) respectively and let \(n(D_k)\) be the norm of the relative discriminant \(D_k\) considered as an ideal of \(k\). Then

\[ D = d^r n(D_k). \]

Satz 40.

Jedes Element des Unterkörpers \(k\) ist dem Produkt von gewissen \(r\) Elementen des Oberkörpers \(K\) gleich, und zwar gelten die Formeln:

\begin{align*} \xi - \xi^{(h)} &\simeq (\Xi - \Xi_{(h)})(\Xi - \Xi_{(h)}^{\prime})\cdots (\Xi - \Xi_{(h)}^{(r-1)}) \\ &\simeq (\Xi - \Xi_{(h)})(\Xi' - \Xi_{(h)})\cdots (\Xi^{(r-1)} - \Xi_{(h)}). \end{align*}

Each element of the subfield \(k\) is equal to the product of \(r\) elements of the extension \(K\); we have in fact

\begin{align*} \xi - \xi^{(h)} &\simeq (\Xi - \Xi_{(h)})(\Xi - \Xi_{(h)}^{\prime})\cdots (\Xi - \Xi_{(h)}^{(r-1)}) \\ &\simeq (\Xi - \Xi_{(h)})(\Xi' - \Xi_{(h)})\cdots (\Xi^{(r-1)} - \Xi_{(h)}). \end{align*}

Satz 41.

Die Differente \(\gothD\) des Körpers \(K\) is gleich dem Produkt der Relativdifferente \(\gothD_k\) von \(K\) in Bezug auf den Unterkörper \(k\) und der Differente \(\gothd\) des Körpers \(k\), d.h. es ist

\[ \gothD = \gothD_k \gothd . \]


The different \(\gothD\) of the field \(K\) is equal to the product of the relative different \(\gothD_k\) of \(K\) with respect to the subfield \(k\) and the different \(\gothd\) of the field \(k\), i.e.

\[ \gothD = \gothD_k \gothd . \]

Kapitel VI. Die Einheiten des Körpers

Hilfssatz 6.

Sind

\begin{align*} f_1 &= a_{11} u_1 + \cdots + a_{1m} u_m, \\ &\hspace{0.5em} \vdots \\ f_m &= a_{m1} u_1 + \cdots + a_{mm} u_m \end{align*}

\(m\) lineare homogene Formen von \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) mit beliebigen reellen Koeffizienten \(a_{11}, \ldots, a_{mm}\) und Determinante \(1\), so kann man \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) stets als ganze rationale Zahlen, die nicht sämtlich \(0\) sind, so bestimmen, dass die Werte jener \(m\) Formen \(f_1, \ldots, f_m\), absolut genommen, sämtlich \(\leq 1\) werden.


Let

\begin{align*} f_1 &= a_{11} u_1 + \cdots + a_{1m} u_m, \\ &\hspace{0.5em} \vdots \\ f_m &= a_{m1} u_1 + \cdots + a_{mm} u_m \end{align*}

be \(m\) linear homogeneous forms of \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) with arbitrary real coefficients \(a_{11}, \ldots, a_{mm}\) and the determinant of matrix \((a_{ij})\) be \(1\). Then we can always find rational integers \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\), not all \(0\), with which the absolute value of each of the forms \(f_1, \ldots, f_m\) is \(\leq 1\).

\(\voka\)

  • ausführlich : in depth
  • Wahrheiten : truth
  • Ergründung der Größenbegriff : explanation of the big concept
  • Umformung die Gestalt : reshaping, rephrase the result
  • abweichend von dem Früheren : different from the already mentioned

Hilfssatz 7.

Sind \(f_1, \ldots, f_m\) \(m\) lineare homogene Formen von \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) mit beliebigen reellen Koeffizienten und der positiven Determinante \(A\), und bedeuten \(\kappa_1, \ldots, \kappa_m\) beliebige positive Konstante, deren Produkt gleich \(A\) ist, so kann man \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) stets als ganze rationale Zahlen, die nicht sämtlich \(0\) sind, so bestimmen, dass die absoluten Werte jener \(m\) Formen den Bedingungen

\[ |f_1| \leq \kappa_1, \ldots, |f_m| \leq \kappa_m \]

genügen.


Let \(f_1, \ldots, f_m\) \(m\) be \(m\) linear homogeneous forms of \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) with arbitrary real coefficients and positive determinant \(A\), and \(\kappa_1, \ldots, \kappa_m\) denote arbitrary positive constants, whose product is \(A\). Then we can always find rational integers \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\), not all \(0\), that the absolute value of each of the forms satisfies the condition

\[ |f_1| \leq \kappa_1, \ldots, |f_m| \leq \kappa_m. \]

\(\rmk\)

  • New notation \(\omega_i^{(j)}\)

    From now on, given a field \(k = k^{(1)}\), there will be \(m-1\) conjugate fields denoted as \(k^{(2)}, \ldots, k^{(m)}\). And in each conjugate field \(k^{(j)}\) the basis \(\omega_1, \ldots, \omega_m\) of \(k\) has its conjugate \(\omega_1^{(s)}, \ldots, \omega_m^{(s)}\).

Satz 42.

Sind \(\kappa_1, \ldots, \kappa_m\) beliebige reelle positive Konstante, deren Produkt gleich \(|\sqrt{d}|\) ist, und die den Bedingungen \(\kappa_s = \kappa_{s'}\) genügen, falls \(k^{(s)}\) und \(k^{(s')}\) konjugiert imaginäre Körper sind, so gibt es im Körper \(k\) immer eine ganze von \(0\) verschiedene Zahl \(\omega\) so, dass

\[ |\omega^{(1)}| \leq \kappa_1, \ldots, |\omega^{(m)}| \leq \kappa_m \]

wird.


Let \(\kappa_1, \ldots, \kappa_m\) be arbitrary positive real constants whose product is \(|\sqrt{d}|\) satisfying the condition that if \(k^{(s)}\) and \(k^{(s')}\) are conjugate imaginary fields then \(\kappa_s = \kappa_{s'}\). Then there exists a nonzero integer \(\omega\) in the field \(k\) such that

\[ |\omega^{(1)}| \leq \kappa_1, \ldots, |\omega^{(m)}| \leq \kappa_m .\]

\(\rmk\)

  • Equation \eqref{s42eq1}

    In the way of proving Satz 42, two linear forms are formed which will be used in stating Hilfssatz 8.

    \begin{align*} \tag{S. 42, Eq. 1} \label{s42eq1} \left\{ \begin{array}{rll} f_s &=& \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \big( (\omega_1^{(s)}+\omega_1^{(s')})u_1 + \cdots + (\omega_m^{(s)}+\omega_m^{(s')})u_m \big), \\ f_{s'}&=& \frac{1}{i\sqrt{2}} \big( (\omega_1^{(s)}-\omega_1^{(s')})u_1 + \cdots + (\omega_m^{(s)}-\omega_m^{(s')})u_m \big). \end{array} \right. \end{align*}

\(\voka\)

  • ordnen : sich zu etwas ordnen, form into something

Satz 43.

Wenn der Grad \(m\) und eine beliebige positive Konstante \(\kappa\) gegeben ist, so existiert nur eine endliche Anzahl von ganzen algebraischen Zahlen $m$ten Grades, die nebst allen ihren Konjugierten, absolut genommen, \(< \kappa\) sind.


For a given degree \(m\) and a given positive constant \(\kappa\), there exist only finitely many algebraic integers of degree \(m\) which, along with their conjugates, have absolute value less than \(\kappa\).

Satz 44.

Die Diskriminante \(d\) eines Zahlkörpers \(k\) ist stets verschieden von \(\pm 1\).


The discriminant \(d\) of a number field \(k\) is always different from \(\pm 1\).

Satz 45.

Es gibt nur eine endliche Anzahl von Körpern $m$ten Grades mit gegebener Diskriminante \(d\).


There is only a finite number of fields of degree \(m\) with given discriminant \(d\).

Hilfssatz 8.

Wenn \(f_1, \ldots, f_m\) die in Formel \eqref{s42eq1} definierten \(m\) reellen Linearformen der Unbestimmten \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) bedeuten, so existiert im Körper \(k\) stets eine solche von \(0\) verschiedene ganze Zahl \(\alpha = a_1\omega_1 + \cdots + a_m\omega_m\), für welche die absoluten Beträge dieser Formen für \(u_1 = a_1, \ldots, u_m = a_m\) den Bedingungen

\begin{align*} \tag{H. 8, Eq. 1} \label{h8eq1} |f_1| \leq |\sqrt{d}|, |f_2| < 1, |f_3| < 1, \ldots, |f_m| < 1 \end{align*}

genügen.


If \(f_1, \ldots, f_m\) are the \(m\) real linear forms in the indeterminates \(u_1, \ldots, u_m\) defined in equations \eqref{s42eq1} then there exists a nonzero integer \(\alpha = a_1\omega_1 + \cdots + a_m\omega_m\) in \(k\) for which the absolute values of the forms with \(u_1 = a_1, \ldots, u_m = a_m\) satisfy the inequalities

\begin{align*} \tag{H. 8, Eq. 2} \label{h8eq2} |f_1| \leq |\sqrt{d}|, |f_2| < 1, |f_3| < 1, \ldots, |f_m| < 1 . \end{align*}

Satz 46.

Ist \(\gotha\) ein vorgelegtes Ideal des Körpers \(k\), so gibt es stets eine ganze von \(0\) verschiedene Zahl \(\alpha\) des Körpers, welche durch \(\gotha\) teilbar ist, und deren Norm der Bedingung

\[ |n(\alpha)| \leq |n(\gotha) \sqrt{d}| \]

genügt.


For each ideal \(\gotha\) of a field \(k\) there exists a nonzero integer \(\alpha\) in \(k\) which is divisible by \(\gotha\) and whose norm satisfies the condition

\[ |n(\alpha)| \leq |n(\gotha) \sqrt{d}| . \]

Satz 47.

Sind unter den \(m\) konjugierten Körpern \(k^{(1)}, \ldots, k^{(m)}\) \(r_1\) reelle Körper und \(r_2 = \dfrac{m-r_1}2\) imaginäre Körperpaare vorhanden, so gibt es im Körper \(k = k^{(1)}\) ein System von \(r = r_1 + r_2 - 1\) Einheiten \(\varepsilon_1, \ldots, \varepsilon_r\) von der Beschaffenheit, dass jede vorhandene Einheit \(\varepsilon\) des Körpers \(k\) auf eine und nur auf eine Weise in der Gestalt

\[ \varepsilon = \rho \varepsilon_1^{a_1} \cdots \varepsilon_r^{a_r} \]

dargestellt werden kann, wo \(a_1, \ldots, a_r\) ganze rationale Zahlen sind, und wo \(\rho\) eine in \(k\) vorkommende Einheitswurzel bedeutet.


Suppose that among the \(m\) conjugate fields \(k^{(1)}, \ldots, k^{(m)}\) there are \(r_1\) real fields and \(r_2 = \dfrac{m-r_1}2\) pairs of conjugate imaginary fields. Then \(k = k^{(1)}\) contains a set of \(r = r_1 + r_2 - 1\) units \(\varepsilon_1, \ldots, \varepsilon_r\) such that every unit \(\varepsilon\) of \(k\) can be uniquely expressed in the form

\[ \varepsilon = \rho \varepsilon_1^{a_1} \cdots \varepsilon_r^{a_r} ,\]

where \(a_1, \ldots, a_r\) are rational integers and \(\rho\) is a root of unity in \(k\).

Hilfssatz 9.

Im Körper \(k\) gibt es stets eine Einheit \(\varepsilon\), welche die Bedingung

\[ \gamma_1 l_1(\varepsilon) + \cdots + \gamma_r l_r(\varepsilon) \neq 0 \]

erfüllt, wobei \(\gamma_1, \ldots, \gamma_r\) beliebige vorgeschriebene, nicht sämtlich verschwindende reelle Konstante sind.


Let \(\gamma_1, \ldots, \gamma_r\) be arbitrary real constants, not all zero. Then there exists a unit \(\varepsilon\) in \(k\) such that

\[ \gamma_1 l_1(\varepsilon) + \cdots + \gamma_r l_r(\varepsilon) \neq 0 . \]

Satz 48.

Eine jede Einheit, die selbst und deren Konjugierte sämtlich den absoluten Betrag \(1\) besitzen, ist eine Einheitswurzel.


A unit which, together with all its conjugates, has absolute value \(1\) is a root of unity.

Kapitel VII. Die Idealklassen des Körpers

Satz 49.

Es gibt stets eine und nur eine Idealklasse \(B\), die, mit einer gegebenen Idealklasse \(A\) multipliziert, die Hauptklasse ergebt.


Let \(A\) be an ideal class; then there exists one and only one ideal class \(B\) whose product with \(A\) is is the principal class.

Satz 50.

In jeder Idealklasse gibt es ein Ideal, dessen Norm die absolut genommene Quadratwurzel aus der Körperdiskriminante nicht übersteigt. Die Anzahl der Idealklassen eines Zahlkörpers ist endlich.


In every ideal class there exists an ideal whose norm does not exceed the absolute value of the square root of the discriminant of the field. The number of ideal classes of a number field is finite.

Satz 51.

Ist \(h\) die Anzahl der Idealklassen, so liefert die $h$te Potenz einer jeden Klasse stets die Hauptklasse.


If \(h\) is the number of ideal classes then the $h$-th power of each class is the principal class.

Satz 52.

Wenn \(\alpha\) und \(\beta\) zwei beliebige ganze Zahlen sind, so gibt es stets eine sowohl in \(\alpha\) wie in \(\beta\) aufgehende ganze von \(0\) verschiedene Zahl \(\gamma\), welche eine Darstellung \(\gamma = \xi \alpha + \eta \beta\) gestattet, wo \(\xi, \eta\) geeignet gewählte ganze Zahlen sind. Die Zahlen \(\gamma, \xi, \eta\) gehören im allgemeinen nicht dem durch \(\alpha\) und \(\beta\) bestimmten Zahlkörper an.


If \(\alpha\) and \(\beta\) are two arbitrary algebraic integers, then there always exists nonzero algebraic number \(\gamma\) dividing \(\alpha\) as well as \(\beta\), which can be written as \(\gamma = \xi \alpha + \eta \beta\), where \(\xi, \eta\) are suitable chosen algebraic integers. The numbers \(\gamma, \xi, \eta\) in general do not belong to the field determined by \(\alpha\) and \(\beta\).

Satz 53.

Es seien \(\kappa, \rho\) und \(\kappa^*, \rho^*\) zwei Zahlenpaare des Körpers \(k\); damit \(i = (\kappa, \rho) = (\kappa^*, \rho^*)\) werde, ist es notwendig und hinreichend, dass man im Körper \(k\) vier ganze Zahlen \(\alpha, \beta, \gamma, \delta\) finden kann, deren Determinante \(\alpha\delta - \beta\gamma = 1\) ist, und durch welche die Gleichungen

\begin{align*} \kappa^* &= \alpha \kappa + \beta \rho, \\ \rho^* &= \gamma \kappa + \delta \rho \end{align*}

erfüllt sind.


Let \(\kappa, \rho\) and \(\kappa^*, \rho^*\) be two pairs of numbers in the field \(k\). In order that \(i = (\kappa, \rho) = (\kappa^*, \rho^*)\) it is necessary and sufficient that there be four integers \(\alpha, \beta, \gamma, \delta\) in \(k\) whose determinant \(\alpha\delta - \beta\gamma = 1\) and which satisfy the equations

\begin{align*} \kappa^* &= \alpha \kappa + \beta \rho, \\ \rho^* &= \gamma \kappa + \delta \rho . \end{align*}

\(\rmk\)

  • Each ideal in field \(k\) can be written in the form \(i = (\kappa, \rho)\); the ratio \(\theta = \frac{\kappa}\rho\) determines the ideal class to which \(i\) belongs. This \(\theta\) is called the numerical fraction to which the ideal class is attached.

Hilfssatz 10.

Ist \(t\) eine reelle positive Veränderliche und \(T\) die Anzahl aller derjenigen durch das gegebene Ideal \(\gotha\) teilbaren Hauptideale, deren Normen \(\leq t\) sind, so ist

\begin{align*} \lim_{t \to \infty} \frac{T}t = \frac{2^{r_1+r_2} \pi^{r_2}}{w}\cdot \frac{1}{n(\gotha)} \frac{R}{|\sqrt{d}|}, \end{align*}

wo \(w\) die Anzahl der in \(k\) vorkommenden Einheitswurzeln und \(R\) den Regulator des Körpers \(k\) bezeichnet. Die Bedeutung von \(r_1, r_2\) ist in Satz 47 erklärt.


Let \(\gotha\) be an ideal of \(k\); let \(t\) be a positive real variable and \(T\) the number of all principal ideals which are divisible by \(\gotha\) and whose norms are \(\leq t\). Then

\begin{align*} \lim_{t \to \infty} \frac{T}t = \frac{2^{r_1+r_2} \pi^{r_2}}{w}\cdot \frac{1}{n(\gotha)} \frac{R}{|\sqrt{d}|}, \end{align*}

where \(w\) is the number of roots of unity in \(k\), \(R\) is the regulator of \(k\) and \(r_1, r_2\) are as explained in Theorem 47.

Satz 54.

Wenn \(T\) die Anzahl aller Ideale einer Klasse \(A\) bedeutet, deren Normen \(\leq t\) ausfallen, so ist

\[ \lim_{t \to \infty} \frac{T}t = \kappa. \]


If \(T\) is the number of ideals in a class \(A\) with norm \(\leq t\) then we have

\[ \lim_{t \to \infty} \frac{T}t = \kappa. \]

Satz 55.

Ist \(T\) die Anzahl aller Ideale des Körper \(k\), deren Normen \(\leq\) ausfallen, und bedeutet \(h\) die Anzahl der Idealklassen, so ist

\[ \lim_{t \to \infty} \frac{T}t = h \kappa. \]


If \(T\) is the number of all ideals of the field \(k\) with norm \(\leq t\) and \(h\) is the number of ideal classes then

\[ \lim_{t \to \infty} \frac{T}t = h \kappa. \]

Satz 56.

Die unendliche Reihe

\[ \zeta (s) = \sum_\gothi \frac{1}{n(\gothi)^s} , \]

in welcher \(\gothi\) alle Ideale des Körpers durchläuft, konvergiert für reelle Werte von \(s > 1\), und es ist

\[ \lim_{s \to 1} (s-1) \zeta (s) = h\kappa. \]


The infinite series

\[ \zeta (s) = \sum_\gothi \frac{1}{n(\gothi)^s} , \]

in which \(\gothi\) runs through all ideals of the field, converges for all real numbers \(s > 1\) and

\[ \lim_{s \to 1} (s-1) \zeta (s) = h\kappa. \]

Satz 57.

Es gibt stets \(q\) Klassen \(A_1, \ldots A_q\), so dass jede andere Klasse \(A\) auf eine und nur auf eine Weise in der Gestalt \(A = A_1^{x_1}, \ldots, A_q^{x_q}\) darstellbar ist; dabei durchlaufen \(x_1, \ldots, x_q\) die ganzen Zahlen $0, 1, 2 \ldots $ bez. bis \(h_1 - 1, \ldots, h_q - 1\), und es ist \(A_1^{h_1} = 1, \ldots, A_q^{h_q} = 1\) und \(h = h_1 \cdots h_q\).


There exist \(q\) classes \(A_1, \ldots A_q\) such that every class \(A\) can be represented in one and only one way in the form \(A = A_1^{x_1}, \ldots, A_q^{x_q}\) where the exponents \(x_1, \ldots, x_q\) run through the ranges from \(0, 1, 2, \ldots\), to \(h_1 - 1, \ldots, h_q - 1\) respectively; further \(A_1^{h_1} = 1, \ldots, A_q^{h_q} = 1\) and \(h = h_1 \cdots h_q\).

Kapitel VIII. Die zerlegbaren Formen des Körpers

Satz 58.

Die Diskriminante einer zerlegbaren Form \(U\) des Körpers \(k\) ist gleich der Körperdiskriminante \(d\).


The discriminant of a reducible form \(U\) of a field \(k\) is equal to the field discriminant \(d\).

Satz 59.

Wenn \(U\) eine primitive, im Körper \(k\) zerlegbare, aber in jedem Körper niederen Grades unzerlegbare Form $m$ten Grades mit der Diskriminante \(d\) des Körpers ist, so gibt es in \(k\) mindestens eine und höchstens \(m\) Idealklassen, denen die Form \(U\) zugehört.


Let \(U\) be a primitive form of a field \(k\) with degree \(m\) and discriminant equal to the field discriminant \(d\). If \(U\) is reducible in \(k\) but irreducible in every field of lower degree then there exist in \(k\) at least one and at most \(m\) ideal classes to which the form \(U\) is associated.

Kapitel IX. Die Zahlringe des Körpers

Satz 60.

Sind \(\iota_1, \ldots, \iota_m\) irgend \(m\) ganze Zahlen des Körpers \(k\), zwischen denen keine lineare Relation mit ganze rationalen Zahlenkoeffizienten besteht, so gibt es stets einen Ring \(r\), in welchem \(\iota_1, \ldots, \iota_m\) die Basis eines Ringideals bilden.


Let \(\iota_1, \ldots, \iota_m\) be any \(m\) integers of the field \(k\) which satisfy no linear relation with rational integer coefficients. Then there exists an order \(r\) in which, for a suitably chosen integer \(A\), the products \(A\iota_1, \ldots, A\iota_m\) form the basis of an order ideal.

\(\rmk\)

  • In the German original \(A\) didn’t appear.

Satz 61.

Es gibt in jedem Ringe \(r\) stets Ring ideale \(\gothi_r\), welche zugleich Körper ideale sind.


In every order \(r\) there exist order ideals which are also field ideals.

\(\rmk\)

  • “Order” (Ordnung) was used by Dedekind for ring.

Satz 62.

Jedes durch den Führer \(\gothf\) teilbare Ideal \(\gothi\) des Körpers \(k\) ist zugleich ein Ringideal des Ringes \(r\).


Every ideal \(\gothi\) of the field \(k\) which is divisible by the conductor of the order \(r\) is also an order ideal of \(r\).

\(\rmk\)

  • The greatest common divisor of all the field ideals which are also order ideals of the order \(r\) is called the conductor of the order \(r\).

Satz 63.

Der größte gemeinsame Teiler der Differenten aller ganzen Zahlen des Körpers \(k\) ist gleich der Differente \(\gothd\) des Körpers. Ist \(\delta\) die Differente einer ganzen Zahl \(\vartheta\), welche den Körper \(k\) bestimmt, und \(\gothf\) der Führer des durch \(\vartheta\) bestimmten Zahlringes, so ist \(\delta = \gothf \gothd\).


The greatest common divisor of the differents of all the integers of a field is equal to the different \(\gothd\) of the field. If \(\delta\) is the different of an integer \(\vartheta\) which generates \(k\) and \(\gothf\) is the conductor of the order determined by \(\vartheta\) then \(\delta = \gothf \gothd\).

Satz 64.

Wenn \(\gothi\) ein beliebiges zu dem Führer \(\gothf\) primes Körperideal ist, so existiert im Ringe \(r\) stets ein Ringideal \(\gothi_r\), dem das Körperideal \(\gothi\) zugeordnet ist.


If \(\gothi\) is a field ideal prime to the conductor \(\gothf\) of the order \(r\) then there exists an order ideal \(\gothi_r\) in \(r\) with which the ideal \(\gothi\) is associated.

Satz 65.

Dem Produkt zweier regulärer Ring ideale ist stets das Produkt der zugeordneten Körper ideale zugeordnet.


The field ideal associated with the product of two regular order ideals is the product of the field ideals associated with the factors.

Satz 66.

Sind \(h\) und \(h_r\) die Anzahlen der Idealklassen des Körpers \(k\) bez. des Ringes \(r\), beide für die engere Fassung des Klassenbegriffes, so ist

\[ \frac{h_r}h = \frac{\varphi(\gothf)}{\varphi(\gothf)} \frac{w_r R}{w R_r}. \]


Let \(h\) and \(h_r\) be the numbers of ideal classes in the field \(k\) and the order \(r\) respectively, both with respect to equivalence in the strict sense. Then

\[ \frac{h_r}h = \frac{\varphi(\gothf)}{\varphi(\gothf)} \frac{w_r R}{w R_r}. \]

Kapitel X. Die Primideale des Galois’schen Körpers und seiner Unterkörper

Hilfssatz 11.

Die $M!$te Potenz eines jeden invarianten Ideals \(\gothI\) ist gleich einer ganzen rationalen Zahl.


The $M!$-th power of each invariant ideal \(\gothI\) is equal to a rational integer.

Satz 67.

Zu einem jeden beliebigen Ideal \(\gothA\) des Galois’schen Körpers \(K\) lässt sich stets ein Ideal \(\gothB\) so finden, dass das Produkt \(\gothA \gothB\) ein Hauptideal wird.


For each ideal \(\gothA\) of a Galois number field \(K\) there exists an ideal \(\gothB\) such that the product \(\gothA \gothB\) is a principal ideal.

Satz 68.

Die Elemente eines Galois’schen Körpers \(K\) vertauschen sich unter einander bei Anwendung einer der \(M\) Substitutionen \(s_1, \ldots, s_M\). Die Differente \(\gothD\) des Körpers \(K\) ist ein invariantes Ideal, und die Diskriminante \(D = \pm N(\gothD)\) ist daher, als Ideal, die $M$te Potenz der Differente \(\gothD\).

Satz 69.

Die Trägheitsgruppe \(g_t\) des Primideals \(\gothP\) ist eine invariante Untergruppe der Zerlegungsgruppe \(g_z\). Man erhält alle Substitutionen der Zerlegungsgruppe und jede nur einmal, wenn man die Substitutionen der Trägheitsgruppe mit \(1, z, z^2, \ldots, z^{f-1}\) multipliziert, wo \(z\) eine geeignet gewählte Substitution der Zerlegungsgruppe ist.

Satz 70.

Das Ideal \(\gothp = \gothP^{r_t}\) liegt im Zerlegungskörper \(k_z\) und ist in diesem ein Primideal ersten Grades. Im Zerlegungskörper \(k_z\) wird \(p = \gothp \gotha\), wo \(\gotha\) ein zu \(\gothp\) primes Ideal ist.

Satz 71.

Die Verzweigungsgruppe \(g_v\) ist eine invariante Untergruppe der Trägheitsgruppe; der Grad \(r_v\) derselben ist eine Potenz von \(p\), etwa \(r_v = p^l\). Man erhält alle Substitutionen der Trägheitsgruppe und jede nur einmal, indem man die Substitutionen der Verzweigungsgruppe mit \(1, t, t^2, \ldots, t^{h-1}\) multipliziert, wo \(h = \frac{r_t}{r_v}\) und \(t\) eine geeignet gewählte Substitutionen der Trägheitsgruppe ist. Die Zahl \(h\) ist ein Teiler von \(p^f - 1\).

Satz 72.

Jede Zahl des Körpers \(K\) ist nach \(\gothP\) einer Zahl des Trägheitskörpers kongruent. Der Trägheitskörper bewirkt keine Zerlegung des Ideals \(\gothp\), sondern nur eine Graderhöhung desselben, insofern \(\gothp\) beim Übergang vom Körper \(k_z\) in den oberen Körper \(k_t\) aus einem Primideal ersten Grades sich in ein Primideal $f$ten Grades verwandelt.

Satz 73.

Zur Verzweigungsgruppe \(g_v\) gehören alle und nur solche Substitutionen \(s\), bei deren Anwendung für sämtliche ganze Zahlen \(\Omega\) des Körpers \(K\) die Kongruenz \(s\Omega \equiv \Omega\) nach \(\gothP^2\) besteht.

Satz 74.

Das Ideal \(\gothp_v = \gothP^{r_v}\) liegt im Verzweigungskörper und ist in demselben ein Primideal $f$ten Grades: es findet somit im Verzweigungskörper die Spaltung des Ideals \(\gothp = \gothp_v^h\) in \(h\) gleiche Primfaktoren statt.

Satz 75.

Die einmal überstrichene Verzweigungsgruppe \(g_{\bar v}\) ist eine invariante Untergruppe der Verzweigungsgruppe \(g_v\). Der Grad von \(g_{\bar v}\) sei \(r_{\bar v} = p^{\bar l}\). Man erhält alle Substitutionen der Verzweigungsgruppe \(g_v\) und jede nur einmal, indem man die Substitutionen der einmal überstrichenen Verzweigungsgruppe \(g_{\bar v}\) mit gewissen \(p^{\bar e}\) Substitutionen \(v_1, \ldots, v_{p^{\bar e}}\) der Verzweigungsgruppe \(g_v\) multipliziert; dabei haben diese \(p^{\bar e}\) Substitutionen die Besonderheit, dass für irgend zwei derselben \(v_i\) und \(v_{i^\prime}\), stets eine Relation von der Gestalt \(v_i v_{i^\prime} = v_{i^\prime} v_i {\bar v}\) besteht, wo \(\bar v\) eine Substitution in \(g_{\bar v}\) ist. Das Ideal \(\gothp_{\bar v} = \gothP^{r_{\bar v}}\) ist Primideal in \(k_{\bar v}\): es findet somit in \(k_{\bar v}\) die Spaltung des Ideals \(\gothp_v = \gothp_{\bar v}^{p^{\bar e}}\) in \(p^{\bar e}\) gleiche Primfaktoren statt; dabei ist der Exponent \(\bar e\) eine Zahl, die den Grad \(f\) des Primideals \(\gothP\) nicht überschreitet.

Kapitel XI. Die Differenten und Diskriminanten des Galois’schen Körpers und seiner Unterkörper

Satz 76.

Die Differente des zum Primideal \(\gothP\) gehören Trägheitskörpers ist nicht durch \(\gothP\) teilbar. Der Trägheitskörper umfasst sämtliche in \(K\) enthaltenen Unterkörper, deren Differenten nicht durch \(\gothP\) teilbar sind.

Satz 77.

Die Relativdifferente des Verzweigungskörpers in Bezug auf den Trägheitskörper ist durch \(\gothP^{r_t - r_v} = \gothp_v^{h-1}\) und durch keine höhere Potenz von \(\gothP\) teilbar.

Satz 78.

Die Relativdifferente des einmal überstrichenen Verzweigungskörpers \(k\) in Bezug auf den Verzweigungskörper \(k_v\) enthält genau die Potenz \(\gothP^{L(r_v - v_{\bar v})} = \gothp_{\bar v}^{L(p^{\bar e}-1)}\). Die Relativdifferente des zweimal überstrichenen Verzweigungskörpers \(k_{\bar{\bar v}}\) in Bezug auf \(k_{\bar v}\) enthält genau die Potenz \(\gothP^{\bar{L}(r_{\bar v} - r_{\bar{\bar v}})} = \gothp_{\bar{\bar v}}^{\bar{L}(p^{\bar{\bar e}}-1)}\) u.s.w.

Satz 79.

Der Exponent der Potenz, zu welcher die rationale Primzahl \(p\) in der Diskriminante \(D\) des Körpers \(K\) als Faktor vorkommt, ist

\[ m_t \big( r_t - r_v + L(r_v - r_{\bar v}) + \bar{L}(r_{\bar v} - r_{\bar{\bar v}}) + \cdots \big). \]

Satz 80.

Der Exponent der in der Diskriminante \(D\) aufgehenden Potenz von der rationalen Primzahl \(p\) überschreitet nicht eine gewisse Grenze, die nur vom Grade \(M\) des Galois’schen Körpers \(K\) abhängt.

Kapitel XII. Die Beziehungen der arithmetischen zu algebraischen Eigenschaften des Galois’schen Körpers

Satz 81.

Der Trägheitskörper \(k_t\) ist relativ zyklisch vom Relativgrade \(f\) in Bezug auf den Zerlegungskörper \(k_z\). Der Verzweigungskörper \(k_v\) ist relativ zyklisch vom Relativgrade \(h\) in Bezug auf den Trägheitskörper \(k_t\). Der einmal überstrichene Verzweigungskörper \(k_{\bar v}\) ist ein relativ Abel’scher vom Relativgrade \(p^{\bar e}\) in Bezug auf den Verzweigungskörper \(k_v\); der Körper \(k_{\bar{\bar v}}\) ist ein relativ Abel’scher vom Relativgrade \(p^{\bar{\bar e}}\) in Bezug auf \(k_{\bar v}\) u.s.f. Die Abel’schen Relativgruppen der Körper \(k_{\bar v}, k_{\bar{\bar v}}, \ldots\) enthalten lediglich Substitutionen vom $p$ten Grade.

Satz 82.

Der Zerlegungskörper eines jeden Primideals in \(K\) bestimmt einen Rationalitätsbereich, in welchem die Zahlen des ursprünglichen Galois’schen Körpers \(K\) lediglich durch Wurzelausdrücke darstellbar sind.

Satz 83.

Wenn in einem beliebigen Körper $m$ten Grades von den Primzahlen der \(m\) Arten \(p_1, \ldots, p_m\) irgend \(m-1\) Arten Dichtigkeiten besitzen, so besitzt auch die übrigbleibende Art eine Dichtigkeit, und die \(m\) Dichtigkeiten \(\Delta_1, \ldots, \Delta_m\) erfüllen die Relation:

\[ \Delta_1 + 2\Delta_2 + \cdots + m\Delta_m = 1. \]

Satz 84.

In einem Galois’schen Körper $M$ten Grades besitzen die in lauter Primideale ersten Grades zerfallenden Primzahlen \(p_M\) eine Dichtigkeit, und diese Dichtigkeit ist \(\Delta_M = \frac{1}M\).

Kapitel XIII. Die Zusammensetzung der Zahlkörper

Satz 85.

Wird aus den beiden Körpern \(k_1\) und \(k_2\) ein Körper \(K\) zusammengesetzt, so enthält die Diskriminante des zusammengesetzten Körpers \(K\) alle und nur diejenigen rationalen Primzahlen als Faktoren, welche in der Diskriminante von \(k_1\) oder in derjenigen von \(k_2\) oder in beiden aufgehen.

Satz 86.

Wenn man aus dem Körper \(k\) vom $m$ten Grade und den sämtlichen zu ihm konjugierten Körpern \(k^\prime, \ldots, k^{(m-1)}\) einen Galois’schen Körper \(K\) zusammensetzt, so enthält die Diskriminante dieses Körpers \(K\) alle und nur diejenigen rationalen Primzahlen, welche in der Diskriminante des Körpers \(k\) aufgehen.

Satz 87.

Zwei Körper \(k_1\) und \(k_2\) bezüglich von den Graden \(m_1\) und \(m_2\), deren Diskriminanten zu einander prim sind, ergeben durch Zusammensetzung stets einen Körper vom Grade \(m_1 m_2\).

Satz 88.

Wenn \(k_1, k_2\) zwei Körper bezüglich von den Graden \(m_1, m_2\) und mit den zu einander primen Diskriminanten \(d_1, d_2\) sind, so ist die Diskriminante des zusammengesetzten Körpers \(K\) gleich \(d_1^{m_2}d_2^{m_1}\). Die \(m_1 m_2\) Zahlen einer Basis des Körpers \(K\) erhält man, wenn man jede der \(m_1\) Basiszahlen des Körpers \(k_1\) mit jeder der \(m_2\) Basiszahlen des Körpers \(k_2\) multipliziert. Ist \(p\) eine rationale Primzahl, welche in \(k_1\) die Zerlegung \(p = \gothp_1^{e_1} \cdots \gothp_r^{e_r}\) und in \(k_2\) die Zerlegung \(p = \gothq_1 \cdots \gothq_s\) erfährt, wo \(\gothp_1, \ldots, \gothp_r\) und \(\gothq_1, \ldots, \gothq_s\) von einander verschiedene Primideale bez. in den Körpern \(k_1\) und \(k_2\) bedeuten, so gilt in \(K\) die Zerlegung \(p = \prod_{i, l} \gothP_{il}^{e_i}\), wo das Produkt über \(i = 1, \ldots, r\) und \(l = 1, \ldots, s\) zu erstrecken ist und \(\gothP_{il}\) dasjenige Primideal in \(K\) bedeutet, welches als der größte gemeinsame Teiler der beiden Ideale \(\gothp_i\) und \(\gothq_l\) definiert ist.

Kapitel XIV. Die Primideale ersten Grades und der Klassenbegriff

Satz 89.

In jeder Idealklasse eines Galois’schen Körpers gibt es Ideale, deren Primfaktoren sämtlich Ideale ersten Grades sind.

Hilfssatz 12.

Wenn \(K\) ein Galois’scher Körper vom $M$ten Grade mit der Diskriminante \(D\) ist, und \(\gothP\) ein in \(DM!\) nicht aufgehendes Primideal von einem Grade \(f > 1\) in diesem Körper bedeutet, so gibt es stets eine zu \(DM!\) prime ganze Zahl \(\Omega\) in \(K\), welche durch \(\gothP\), aber nicht durch \(\gothP^2\) teilbar ist, und deren übrige Primfaktoren sämtlich von niederem als dem \(f\) ten Grade sind.

Kapitel XV. Der relativ zyklische Körper vom Primzahlgrade

Satz 90.

Jede ganze oder gebrochene Zahl \(A\) in \(K\), deren Relativnorm in Bezug auf \(k\) gleich \(1\) ist, wird die symbolische $(1-S)$te Potenz einer gewissen ganzen Zahl \(B\) des Körpers \(K\).

Satz 91.

Wenn der Relativgrad \(l\) des relativ zyklischen Körpers \(K\) in Bezug auf den Körper \(k\) eine ungerade Primzahl ist, so existiert in \(K\) stets ein System von \(r+1\) relativen Grundeinheiten, wobei \(r\) für \(k\) die Bedeutung wie in Satz 47 hat.

Satz 92.

Falls der Relativgrad \(l\) des relativ zyklischen Körpers \(K\) in Bezug auf den Körper \(k\) eine ungerade Primzahl ist, gibt es in \(K\) stets eine Einheit \(H\), deren Relativnorm in Bezug auf \(k\) gleich \(1\) ausfällt, und welche doch nicht die symbolische $(1-S)$te Potenz von einer Einheit des Körpers \(K\) ist.

Satz 93.

Die Relativdifferente des relativ zyklischen Körpers \(K\) in Bezug auf \(k\) enthält alle und nur diejenigen Primideale \(\gothP\), welche ambig sind.

Satz 94.

Wenn der relativ zyklische Körper \(K\) von ungeradem Primzahl Relativgrade \(l\) die Relativdifferente \(1\) in Bezug auf \(k\) besitzt, so gibt es stets in \(k\) ein Ideal \(\gothi\), welches nicht Hauptideal in \(k\) ist, wohl aber ein Hauptideal in \(K\) wird. Die $l$te Potenz dieses Ideals \(\gothi\) ist dann notwendig auch in \(k\) ein Hauptideal, und die Klassenzahl des Körpers \(k\) ist mithin durch \(l\) teilbar.

Kapitel XVI. Die Zerlegung der Zahlen im quadratischen Körper

Satz 95.

Eine Basis des quadratischen Körpers \(k\) bilden die Zahlen \(1\), \(\omega\), wenn

\[ \omega = \frac{1+\sqrt{m}}2, {\rm bez. } \omega = \sqrt{m}\]

genommen wird, je nachdem die Zahl \(m \equiv 1\) nach \(4\) ist oder nicht. Die Diskriminante von \(k\) ist, entsprechend diesen zwei Fällen,

\[ d = m, {\rm bez. } d = 4m. \]

Satz 96.

Jede in \(d\) aufgehende rationale Primzahl \(l\) ist gleich dem Quadrat eines Primideals in \(k\). Jede ungerade, in \(d\) nicht aufgehende rationale Primzahl \(p\) zerfällt in \(k\) entweder in das Produkt zweier verschiedener, zu einander konjugierter Primideale ersten Grades \(\gothp\) und \(\gothp^\prime\) oder stellt selbst ein Primideal zweiten Grades vor, je nachdem \(d\) quadratischer Rest oder Nichtrest für \(p\) ist. Die Primzahl \(2\) ist im Falle \(m \equiv 1\) nach \(4\) in \(k\) in ein Produkt zweier von einander verschiedener konjugiert Primideale zerlegbar oder selber Primideal, je nachdem \(m \equiv 1\) oder \(\equiv 5\) nach \(8\) ausfällt.

Satz 97.

Eine beliebige rationale Primzahl \(p (=2)\) oder \(\neq 2\) ist im Körper \(k\) in zwei von einander verschiedene Primideale zerlegbar oder selbst Primideal oder gleich dem Quadrat eines Primideals, je nachdem \(\left( \frac{d}p \right) = +1, -1\) oder \(0\) ist.

Kapitel XVII. Die Geschlechter im quadratischen Körper und ihre Charakterensysteme

Satz 98.

Bedeuten \(n\) und \(m\) ganze rationale, nicht durch \(w\) teilbare Zahlen, so gelten folgende Regeln:

für ungerade Primzahlen \(w\) wird

\begin{align*} \tag{$a^\prime$} \label{s98a1} \left( \frac{n,m}{w} \right) &= +1, \\ \tag{$a^{\prime \prime}$} \label{s98a2} \left( \frac{n,w}{w} \right) &= \left( \frac{w,n}{w} \right) = \left(\frac{n}{w} \right) ; \end{align*}

für \(w = 2\) wird

\begin{align*} \tag{$b^\prime$} \label{s98b1} \left( \frac{n,m}2 \right) &= (-1)^{\frac{n-1}2 \frac{m-1}2}, \\ \tag{$b^{\prime \prime}$} \left( \frac{n,2}2 \right) &= \left( \frac{2,n}2 \right) = (-1)^{\frac{n^2-1}8}. \end{align*}

Ferner gelten allgemein für beliebige ganze rationale Zahlen \(n, n^\prime, m, m^\prime\) und in Bezug auf jede Primzahl \(w\) die Formeln:

\begin{align*} \tag{$c^\prime$} \left( \frac{-m, m}w \right) &= +1, \\ \tag{$c^{\prime \prime}$} \left( \frac{n,m}w \right) &= \left( \frac{m, n}w\right), \\ \tag{$c^{\prime \prime \prime}$} \left( \frac{nn^\prime, m}w \right) &= \left( \frac{n,m}w \right) \left( \frac{n^\prime, m}w \right), \\ \tag{$c^{\prime \prime \prime \prime}$} \left( \frac{n, mm^\prime}w\right) &= \left( \frac{n,m}w \right) \left(\frac{n,m^\prime}w \right). \end{align*}

Satz 99.

Die Ideale einer und derselben Klasse im Körper \(k(\sqrt{m})\) besitzen alle dasselbe Charakterensystem.

Satz 100.

Ein beliebig vorgelegtes System von \(r\) Einheiten \(\pm 1\) ist dann und nur dann Charakterensystem eines Geschlechtes des Körpers \(k(\sqrt{m})\), wenn das Produkt der sämtlichen \(r\) Einheiten \(= +1\) ist. Die Anzahl der im Körper \(k(\sqrt{m})\) vorhandenen Geschlechter ist daher gleich \(2^{r-1}\).

Hilfssatz 13.

Wenn in der Diskriminante eines quadratischen Körpers \(k = k(\sqrt{m})\) nur eine einzige Primzahl \(l\) aufgeht, so ist die Anzahl der Idealklassen in \(k\) ungerade. Das Charakterensystem besteht für den Körper \(k\) aus dem einen, auf die Primzahl \(l\) bezüglichen Charakter; dieser Charakter ist stets \(=+1\), d.h. es gibt im Körper \(k\) nur ein Geschlecht: das Hauptgeschlecht.

Satz 101.

Sind \(p, q\) rationale positive, von einander verschiedene, ungerade Primzahlen, so gilt die Regel:

\[ \left( \frac{p}q \right) \left( \frac{q}p \right) = (-1)^{\frac{p-1}2 \cdot \frac{q-1}2}, \]

das sogenannte Reziprozitätsgesetz für quadratische Reste. Überdies gelten die folgenden Regeln:

\[ \left( \frac{-1}p \right) = (-1)^{\frac{p-1}2}, \left( \frac{2}p \right)= (-1)^{\frac{p^2 - 1}8}, \]

die sogenannte Ergänzungssätze zum quadratischen Reziprozitätsgesetz.

Hilfssatz 14.

Wenn \(n\) und \(m\) zwei beliebige ganze rationale Zahlen bedeuten, welche nicht beide negativ sind, so ist

\[ \prod_{(w)} \left( \frac{n, m}w \right) = +1, \]

wo das Produkt linker Hand über sämtliche rationale Primzahlen \(w\) zu erstrecken ist.

Kapitel XVIII. Die Existenz der Geschlechter im quadratischen Körper

Satz 102.

Wenn \(n, m\) zwei ganze rationale Zahlen bedeuten, von denen \(m\) keine Quadratzahl ist, und die für jede beliebige Primzahl \(w\) die Bedingung

\[ \left( \frac{n, m}w \right) = +1 \]

erfüllen, so ist die Zahl \(n\) stets gleich der Norm einer ganzen oder gebrochenen Zahl \(\alpha\) des Körpers \(k(\sqrt{m})\).

Satz 103.

In einem quadratischen Körper ist jede Klasse des Hauptgeschlechtes stets gleich dem Quadrat einer Klasse.

Satz 104.

Sind \(\omega_1, \omega_2\) Basiszahlen des quadratischen Körpers \(k\) und \(\eta_1, \eta_2\) Basiszahlen eines zum Hauptgeschlecht von \(k\) gehörigen Ideals \(gothh\), und ist endlich \(N\) eine beliebig gegebene ganze rationale Zahl, so lassen sich stets vier rationale Zahlen \(r_{11}, r_{12}, r_{21}, r_{22}\) finden, deren Nenner zu \(N\) prim sind, für welche die Determinante \(r_{11}r_{22} - r_{12}r_{21}\) den Wert \(\pm 1\) hat, und vermittelst derer

\[ \frac{\eta_1}{\eta_2} = \frac{r_{11} \omega_1 + r_{12} \omega_2}{r_{21} \omega_1 + r_{22} \omega_2} \]

wird.

Satz 105.

Die \(t\) in der Diskriminante \(d\) des Körpers \(k\) aufgehenden, von einander verschieden Primideale \(\gothl_1, \ldots, \gothl_t\), und nur diese, sind ambige Primideale in \(k\). Die \(2^t\) Ideale \(1, \gothl_1, \gothl_2, \ldots, \gothl_1 \gothl_2, \ldots, \gothl_1 \gothl_2 \cdots \gothl_t\) manchen die Gesamtheit aller ambigen Ideale des Körpers \(k\) aus.

Satz 106.

Die \(t\) ambigen Primideale bestimmen im Falle eines imaginären Körpers stets \(t- 1\) von einander unabhängige ambige Klassen; im Falle eines reellen Körpers bestimmen sie \(t-2\) oder \(t-1\) von einander unabhängige ambige Klassen, je nachdem die Norm der Grundeinheit \(\varepsilon\) des Körpers \(n(\varepsilon) = +1\) oder \(=-1\) ist. Die sämtlichen \(2^t\) ambigen Ideale bestimmen im Falle eines imaginären Körpers \(2^{t-1}\) und im Falle eines reellen Körpers, entsprechend der eben gemachten Unterscheidung, $2t-2 bez. \(2^{t-1}\) von einander verschiedene ambige Klassen.

Satz 107.

Es gibt im quadratischen Körper \(k\) dann und nur dann eine ambige Klasse, welchen kein ambiges Ideal enthält, wenn der Körper \(k\) reell ist, das Charakterensystem von \(-1\) in ihm aus lauter positiven Einheiten besteht und endlich die Norm der Grundeinheit gleich \(+1\) ausfällt. Sind diese Bedingungen erfüllt, so entstehen alle überhaupt vorhandenen Klassen von jener Beschaffenheit dadurch, dass man eine beliebige unter ihnen der Reihe nach mit allen aus den ambigen Idealen entspringenden Klassen multipliziert.

Satz 108.

Es gibt in jedem Falle im Körper \(k\) genau \(r-1\) von einander unabhängige ambige Klassen, wo \(r\) die Anzahl der Einzelcharaktere bedeutet, die das Geschlecht einer Klasse bestimmen. Die Anzahl der sämtlichen von einander verschiedenen ambigen Klassen ist daher gleich \(2^{r-1}\).

Satz 109.

Die Anzahl \(h\) der Idealklassen des quadratischen Körpers \(k\) mit der Diskriminante \(d\) bestimmt sich durch folgende Formel:

\[ \kappa h = \lim_{s \to 1} \prod_{(p)} \frac{1}{1- \left( \frac{d}p \right)p^{-s}}. \]

Hierin ist das Produkt rechter Hand über alle rationalen Primzahlen \(p\) zu erstrecken, und das Symbol \(\left( \frac{d}p \right)\) hat die in \(\S 61\) festgesetzte Bedeutung. Für den Faktor \(\kappa\) gilt, je nachdem der Körper \(k\) imaginär oder reell, also \(d\) negativ oder positiv ist:

\[ \kappa - \frac{2\pi}{w|\sqrt{d}|} {\rm bez. } \kappa = \frac{2\log \varepsilon}{|\sqrt{d}|}. \]

Dabei bedeutet \(w\) für \(d = -3\) die Zahl \(6\), für \(d = -4\) die Zahl \(4\), für jedes andere negative \(d\) die Zahl \(2\); andererseits verstehe man für einen reellen Körper \(k\) unter \(\varepsilon\) jetzt speziell diejenige seiner vier Grundeinheiten, welche \(>1\) ist, und unter \(\log \varepsilon\) den reellen Wert des Logarithmus dieser Grundeinheit \(\varepsilon\).

Satz 110.

Bedeutet \(a\) eine beliebige ganze rationale positive oder negative Zahl, nur nicht eine Quadratzahl, so ist der Grenzwert

\[ \lim_{s \to 1} \prod_{(p)} \frac{1}{1- \left( \frac{d}p \right)p^{-s}} \]

stets eine endliche und von \(0\) verschiedene Größe.

Satz 111.

Bedeuten \(a_1, a_2, \ldots, a_t\) irgend \(t\) ganze rationale positive oder negative Zahlen von der Art, dass keine der \(2^t-1\) Zahlen \(a_1, a_2, \ldots, a_t, a_1 a_2, \ldots, a_{t-1} a_t, \ldots, a_1 a_2 \cdots a_t\) eine Quadratzahl wird, und sind \(c_1, c_2, \ldots, c_t\) nach Belieben vorgeschriebene Einheiten \(+1\) oder \(-1\), so gibt es stets unendlich viele rationale Primzahlen \(p\), für die

\[ \left( \frac{a_1}p \right) = c_1, \left( \frac{a_2}p \right) = c_2, \ldots, \left( \frac{a_t}p \right) = c_t \]

ist.

Satz 112.

Sind

\[ \chi_1 (\gothj) = \left( \frac{\pm n(\gothj), m}{l_1} \right), \ldots, \chi_r (\gothj) = \left( \frac{\pm n(\gothj), m}{l_r} \right) \]

die \(r\) Einzelcharaktere, welche das Geschlecht eines Ideales \(\gothj\) in \(k\) bestimmen, und bedeuten \(c_1, \ldots, c_r\) beliebig angenommene, der Bedingung \(c_1\cdots c_r = +1\) genügende \(r\) Einheiten \(\pm 1\), so gibt es stets unendlich viele Primideale \(\gothp\) im Körper \(k\), für welche

\[ \chi_1(\gothp) = c_1, \ldots, \chi_r (\gothp) = c_r \]

ist.

Satz 113.

Unter den Idealen eines beliebigen Geschlechtes im quadratischen Körper gibt es stets unendlich viele Primideale.

Kapitel XIX. Die Bestimmung der Anzahl der Idealklassen des quadratischen Körpers

Satz 114.

Die Anzahl \(h\) der Idealklassen des Körper \(k(\sqrt{m})\) ist:

\begin{align*} \begin{array}{rcll} h &=& - \frac{w}{2|d|} \sum_{(n)} \left( \frac{d}n \right) n & {\rm für }\, m < 0, \\ h &=& \frac{1}{2 \log \varepsilon} \log \frac{\prod_{(b)} \left( e^{\frac{bi\pi}d} - e^{-\frac{bi\pi}d} \right)}{\prod_{(a)} \left(e^{\frac{a i\pi}d} - e^{-\frac{ai\pi}d} \right)} & {\rm für }\, m > 1, \end{array} \end{align*}

wo die Summe \(\sum_{(n)}\) über die \(|d|\) ganzen rationalen Zahlen \(n = 1, 2, \ldots, |d|\), und wo die Produkt \(\prod_{(a)}, \prod_{(b)}\) über alle diejenigen Zahlen \(a\) und \(b\) unter diesen \(|d|\) Zahlen zu erstrecken sind, welche der Bedingung \(\left( \frac{d}a\right) = +1\) bezüglich \(\left( \frac{d}b \right) = -1\) genügen.

Satz 115.

Die Anzahl der Idealklassen in einem speziellen Dirichlet’schen biquadratischen Körper \(K(\sqrt{+m}, \sqrt{-m})\) ist gleich dem Produkt der Klassen anzahlen in den quadratischen Körpern \(k(\sqrt{+m})\) und \(k(\sqrt{-m})\) oder gleich der Hälfte dieses Produktes, je nachdem für die Grundeinheit des Körpers \(K\) die Relativnorm in Bezug auf \(k(\sqrt{-1})\) gleich \(\pm i\) oder gleich \(\pm 1\) wird.

Kapitel XX. Die Zahlringe und Moduln des quadratischen Körpers

Satz 116.

In einer beliebigen Modulklasse des quadratischen Körpers \(k\) gibt es stets reguläre Ringideale.

Kapitel XXI. Die Einheitswurzeln mit Primzahlexponent \(l\) und der durch sie bestimmte Kreiskörper

Satz 117.

Bedeutet \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl, so besitzt der durch \(\zeta = e^{\frac{2i \pi}l}\) bestimmte Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln den Grad \(l-1\). Die Primzahl \(l\) gestattet in \(k(\zeta)\) die Zerlegung \(l = \gothl^{l-1}\), wo \(\gothl = (1- \zeta)\) ein Primideal ersten Grades in \(k(\zeta)\) ist.

Satz 118.

In dem durch \(\zeta = e^{\frac{2i\pi}l}\) bestimmten Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln bilden die Zahlen

\[ 1, \zeta, \zeta^2, \ldots, \zeta^{l-2} \]

eine Basis. Die Diskriminante des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) ist

\[ d = (-1)^{\frac{l-1}2} l^{l-2}. \]

Satz 119.

Ist \(p\) eine von \(l\) verschiedene rationale Primzahl und \(f\) der kleinst positive Exponent, für welchen \(p^f \equiv 1\) nach \(l\) ausfällt, und wird dann \(l-1 = ef\) gesetzt, so findet im Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) die Zerlegung

\[ p = \gothp_1 \cdots \gothp_e \]

statt, wo \(\gothp_1, \ldots, \gothp_e\) von einander verschiedene Primideale $f$ten Grades in \(k(\zeta)\) sind.

Kapitel XXII. Die Einheitswurzeln für einen zusammengesetzten Wurzelexponenten \(m\) und der durch sie bestimmte Kreiskörper

Satz 120.

Bedeutet \(l\) die Primzahl \(2\) oder eine ungerade Primzahl, so besitzt der durch \(Z = e^{\frac{2i\pi}{l^h}}\) bestimmte Kreiskörper \(k(Z)\) der \(l^h\) ten Einheitswurzeln den Grad \(l^{h-1}(l-1)\). Die Primzahl \(l\) gestattet in \(k(Z)\) die Zerlegung \(l = \gothL^{l^{h-1}(l-1)}\), wo \(\gothL\) ein Primideal ersten Grades in \(k(Z)\) ist.

Satz 121.

In dem durch \(Z = e^{\frac{2i \pi}{l^h}}\) bestimmten Kreiskörper \(k(Z)\) der \(l^h\) ten Einheitswurzeln bilden die Zahlen

\[ 1, Z, Z^2, \ldots, Z^{l^{h-1}(l-1)-1} \]

eine Basis; die Diskriminante dieses Körpers ist

\[ d = \pm l^{l^{h-1}(hl-h-1)} , \]

wo für \(l^h = 4\) und \(l \equiv 3\) nach \(4\) das Vorzeichen \(-\) und sonst das Vorzeichen \(+1\) gilt.

Satz 122.

Ist \(p\) eine von \(l\) verschiedene rationale Primzahl und \(f\) der kleinste positive Exponent, für welchen \(p^f \equiv 1\) nach \(l^h\) ausfällt, und wird \(l^{h-1}(l-1) = ef\) gesetzt, so findet in \(k(Z)\) die Zerlegung

\[ p = \gothP_1 \cdots \gothP_e \]

statt, wo \(\gothP_1, \ldots, \gothP_e\) von einander verschiedene Primzahle $f$ten Grades in \(k(Z)\) sind.

Satz 123.

Der Grad des Körpers \(k(Z)\) der \(m = l_1^{h_1}l_2^{h_2}\cdots\) ten Einheitswurzeln ist:

\[ \Phi(m) = l_1^{h_1}(l_1-1) l_2^{h_2}(l_2-1) \cdots \]

Satz 124.

Der Kreiskörper \(K(Z)\) der $m$ten Einheitswurzeln besitzt die Basis:

\[ 1, Z, Z^2, \ldots, Z^{\Phi(m)-1}. \]

Satz 125.

Ist \(p\) eine in \(m= l_1^{h_1} l_2^{h_2} \cdots\) nicht aufgehende rationale Primzahl und \(f\) der kleinste positive Exponent, für welchen \(p^f \equiv 1\) nach \(m\) ausfällt, und wird dann \(\Phi(m) = ef\) gesetzt, so findet im Kreiskörper \(k(Z)\) der $m$ten Einheitswurzeln die Zerlegung

\[ p = \gothP_1 \cdots \gothP_e \]

statt, wo \(\gothP_1, \ldots, \gothP_e\) von einander verschiedene Primideale $f$ten Grades in \(k(Z)\) sind.

Ist ferner \(p^h\) eine Potenz von \(p\), und wird \(m^* = p^h m\) gesetzt, so findet im Körper \(k(Z^*)\) der \(m^*\) ten Einheitswurzeln die Zerlegung

\[ p = \left\{ \gothP_1^* \cdots \gothP_e^* \right\}^{p^{h-1}(p-1)} \]

statt, wo \(\gothP_1^*, \ldots, \gothP_e^*\) von einander verschiedene Primideale $f$ten Grades in \(k(Z^*)\) sind.

Satz 126.

Wenn \(m\) eine Potenz einer Primzahl \(l\) ist und \(g\) eine nicht durch \(l\) teilbare Zahl bedeutet, so stellt in dem durch \(Z = e^{\frac{2i \pi}{m}}\) bestimmten Kreiskörper der Ausdruck

\[ \frac{1-Z^g}{1-Z} \]

stets eine Einheit dar.

Wenn die Zahl \(m\) verschiedene Primfaktoren enthält und \(g\) eine zu \(m\) prime Zahl bedeutet, so stellt in dem durch \(Z = e^{\frac{2i \pi}m}\) bestimmten Kreiskörper der Ausdruck

\[ 1 - Z^g\]

stets eine Einheit dar.

Satz 127.

Bezeichnet \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl, und betrachten wir in dem durch \(\zeta = e^{\frac{2i \pi}m}\) bestimmten Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) den durch \(\zeta+ \zeta^{-1}\) bestimmten reellen Unterkörper \(k(\zeta+\zeta^{-1})\) vom Grade \(\frac{l-1}2\), so ist ein beliebiges System von Grundeinheiten dieses reellen Körpers \(k(\zeta+\zeta^{-1})\) stets auch für den Körper \(k(\zeta)\) ein System von Grundeinheiten.

Kapitel XXIII. Der Kreiskörper in seiner Eigenschaft als Abel’scher Körper

Satz 128.

Bedeutet \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl, so ist der durch \(Z = e^{\frac{2i \pi}{l^h}}\) bestimmte Kreiskörper ein zyklischer Körper.

Der durch \(Z = e^{\frac{i\pi}{2^h}}\) (\(h\geq 2\)) bestimmte Kreiskörper entsteht durch Zusammensetzung des imaginären quadratischen Körpers \(k(i)\) und des reellen Körpers \(k\left( e^{\frac{i \pi}{2^h}} + e^{-\frac{i \pi}{2^h}}\right)\). Der reelle Körper \(k\left( e^{\frac{i \pi}{2^h}} + e^{-\frac{i \pi}{2^h}}\right)\) ist zyklisch vom Grade \(2^{h-1}\).

Satz 129.

Bedeutet \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl, und betrachtet man den Kreiskörper \(k(Z)\) der \(l^h\) ten Einheitswurzeln, so ist für das in \(l\) enthaltene Primideal \(\gothL = (1-Z)\) der Körper \(k(Z)\) selbst der Verzweigungskörper, während der Körper der rationalen Zahlen gleichzeitig die Rolle des Zerlegungs- und des Trägheits-Körpers für \(\gothL\) übernimmt. Ist ferner \(\gothP\) ein von \(\gothL\) verschiedenes Primideal in \(k(Z)\) vom Grade \(f\), so ist für \(\gothP\) der Körper \(k(Z)\) selbst der Trägheitskörper, während als Zerlegungskörper von \(\gothP\) derjenige Unterkörper \(e= \frac{l^{h-1}(l-1)}f\) ten Grades von \(k(Z)\) erscheint, der zu der Substitutionengruppe

\[ s^e, s^{2e}, s^{3e}, \ldots, s^{fe} \]

gehört. Dabei bedeutet \(s = (Z:Z^r)\) eine solche Substitution der Gruppe des Körpers \(k(Z)\), welche mit ihren Potenzen diese Gruppe vollständig erzeugt.

Satz 130.

Jeder Kreiskörper ist ein Abel’scher Körper. Jeder Unterkörper eines Kreiskörpers ist ein Kreiskörper. Jeder aus Kreiskörpern zusammengesetzte Körper ist wiederum ein Kreiskörper.

Satz 131.

Jeder Abel’sche Zahlkörper im Bereiche der rationalen Zahlen ist ein Kreiskörper.

Hilfssatz 15.

Wenn ein zyklischer Körper \(C_h\) von einem Grade \(l^h\), wo \(l\) eine beliebige Primzahl (\(=2\) oder \(\neq 2\)) ist, nicht den betreffenden Körper \(U_1\) bez. \(II_1\) als Unterkörper enthält, so entsteht durch Zusammensetzung von \(C_h\) mit dem durch \(Z- e^{\frac{2i \pi}{l^h}}\) bestimmten Körper \(k(Z)\) ein Körper \(k(Z, C_h)\) vom Grade \(l^{2h-1}(l-1)\), und es gibt dann stets in \(k(Z)\) eine ganze Zahl \(\kappa\) mit folgenden Eigenschaften: der Körper \(k(Z, C_h)\) ist auch durch die Zahlen \(Z\) und \(\sqrt[l^h]{\kappa}\) bestimmt; bezeichnet \(r\) eine beliebige nicht durch \(l\) teilbare ganze rationale Zahl, und wird aus der Gruppe des Körpers \(k(Z)\) die Substitution

\[ s = (Z: Z^r) \]

ins Auge gefasst, so ist \(\kappa^{s-r}\) die \(l^h\) te Potenz einer Zahl in \(k(Z)\).

Hilfssatz 16.

Wenn \(C_h\) ein zyklischer Körper von einem Grade \(l^h\) ist, wo \(l\) eine beliebige Primzahl (\(=2\) oder \(\neq 2\)) ist, und wenn \(C_1\) den Unterkörper $l$ten Grades von \(C_h\) bezeichnet, so besitzen die etwaigen von \(l\) verschiedenen Primteiler \(p\) der Diskriminante von \(C_1\) durchweg die Kongruenzeigenschaft \(p\equiv 1\) nach \(l^h\).

Hilfssatz 17.

Es sei \(C_h\) zyklischer Körper von einem Grade \(l^h\), wo \(l\) eine beliebige Primzahl (\(=2\) oder \(\neq 2\)) ist; der Unterkörper $l$ten Grades von \(C_h\) werde mit \(C_1\) bezeichnet; die Diskriminante des Körpers \(C_1\) enthalte die von \(l\) verschiedene Primzahl \(p\): dann kann stets ein Abel’scher Körper \(C_{h^\prime}^\prime\) von einem gewissen Grade \(l^{h^\prime} \leq l^h\) mit folgenden beiden Eigenschaften gefunden werden:

Erstens. Der aus \(C_{h^\prime}^\prime\) und einem gewissen Kreiskörper \(P_h\) zusammengesetzt Körper enthält \(C_h\) als Unterkörper.

Zweitens. Die Diskriminante des Körpers \(C_{h^\prime}^\prime\) enthält nur solche Primzahlen, die auch in der Diskriminanten des Körpers \(C\) aufgehen, darunter aber nicht die Primzahl \(p\).

Hilfssatz 18.

Wenn die Diskriminante eines zyklischen Körpers \(C_1\) von einem ungeraden Primzahlgrade \(u\) ausschließlich die Primzahl \(u\) enthält, so stimmt \(C_1\) mit \(U_1\) überein.

Hilfssatz 19.

Wenn ein zyklischer Körper \(C_h\) vom Grade \(l^h\), wo \(l\) gleich einer ungeraden Primzahl \(u\) oder gleich \(2\) ist, den Körpern \(U_1\) bez. \(II_1\) als Unterkörper enthält, so ist \(C_h\) Unterkörper eines solchen Körpers, welcher aus \(U_h\) bez. \(II_h\) und aus einem gewissen zyklischen Körper \(C_{h^\prime}^\prime\) von einem Grade \(l^{h^\prime} < l^h\) durch Zusammensetzung entsteht.

Kapitel XXIV. Die Wurzelzahlen des Kreiskörpers der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln

Hilfssatz 20.

Wenn ein Abel’scher Körper \(K\) eine Normalbasis besitzt, so besitzt auch jeder Unterkörper \(k\) des Körpers \(K\) eine Normalbasis.

Satz 132.

Ein jeder Abel’sche Körper \(K\) vom $M$ten Grade, dessen Diskriminante \(D\) zu \(M\) prim ist, besitzt eine Normalbasis.

Satz 133.

Es sei ein Abel’scher Körper \(k\) vom Grade \(l\) und mit der Diskriminante \(d = p^{l-1}\) vorgelegt, wo \(l\) und \(p\) verschiedene ungerade Primzahlen bedeuten; ferner sei \(\nu, t \nu, \ldots, t^{l-1} \nu\) eine Normalbasis dieses Körpers \(k\). Wird dann \(\zeta = e^{\frac{2i \pi}l}\), \(\gothl = (1- \zeta)\) und \(s = (\zeta:\zeta^r)\) gesetzt, wo \(r\) eine Primitivzahl nach \(l\) bedeute, so besitzt die aus jener Normalbasis entspringende Wurzelzahl \(\Omega\) des Körpers \(k = k(\nu)\) die folgenden drei Eigenschaften:

Erstens. Die $l$te Potenz der Wurzelzahl, \(\omega = \Omega^l\), ist eine Zahl des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\), und zudem wird \(\omega^{s-r}\) gleich der $l$ten Potenz einer Zahl des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\).

Zweitens. Es gelten die sich gegenseitig bedingenden Kongruenzen

\[ \Omega \equiv \pm 1 \bmod (\gothl), \, \omega \equiv \pm 1 \bmod (\gothl^l). \]

Drittens. \(n(\omega)\), die Norm der Zahl \(\omega\) in \(k(\zeta)\), ist \(= p^{\frac{l(l-1)}2}\).

Satz 134.

Es sei \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl und \(\zeta = e^{\frac{2i \pi}l}\), ferner \(p\) eine Primzahl \(\equiv 1\) nach \(l\); wenn dann \(\omega\) eine solche Zahl des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) bedeutet, die nicht gleich der $l$ten Potenz einer Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) wird, und welche die drei in Satz 133 angegebenen Eigenschaften besitzt, so ist \(\Omega= \sqrt[l]{\omega}\) eine Wurzelzahl des Abel’schen Körpers $l$ten Grades von der Diskriminante \(p^{l-1}\).

Satz 135.

Haben \(l, p, \zeta, r, s\) die bisherige Bedeutung, und ist \(k(\nu)\) ein Abel’scher Körper $l$ten Grades mit der Diskriminante \(d = p^{l-1}\) und \(\Omega\) eine Wurzelzahl des Körpers \(k(\nu)\), so gestattet die Zahl \(\omega = \Omega^l\) im Körper \(k(\zeta)\) die Zerlegung

\[ \omega = \gothp^{r_0 r_{-1}s + r_{-2}s^2 + \cdots + r_{-l+2}s^{l-2}},\]

wo \(\gothp\) ein bestimmtes in \(p\) aufgehendes Primideal des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) bedeutet, und wo allgemein \(r_{-i}\) die kleinste positive ganze rationale Zahl bedeutet, welche der $-i$ten Potenz \(r^{-i}\) der Primitivzahl \(r\) nach \(l\) kongruent ist.

Satz 136.

Es sei \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl und \(\zeta = e^{\frac{2i \pi}l}\), ferner \(r\) eine positive Primitivzahl nach \(l\) und \(s = (\zeta: \zeta^r)\); wenn dann \(\gothp\) ein beliebiges Primideal ersten Grades in dem Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) bedeutet, so besteht die Äquivalenz

\[ \gothp^{q_0 + q_{-1}s + q_{-2}s^2 + \cdots + q_{-l+2}s^{l-2}} \sim 1, \]

wo die Größen \(q_{-i}\) ganze rationale, durch das Gleichungssystem

\[ q_{-i} = \frac{r r_{-i} - r_{-i+1}}l, \quad i = 0, 1, \ldots, l-2 \]

bestimmte, nicht negative Zahlen sind. Dabei haben \(r_0, r_{-1}, \ldots, r_{-l+2}\) dieselbe Bedeutung wie in Satz 135, und es ist außerdem \(r_1 = r_{-l+2}\).

Satz 137.

Bezeichnen \(\Omega\) und \(\Omega^*\) für den Abel’schen Körper \(k\) vom ungeraden Primzahlgrade \(l\) mit der Diskriminante \(p^{l-1}\) zwei verschiedene, aber zu derselben erzeugenden Substitution \(t\) der Gruppe dieses Körpers gehörende Wurzelzahlen, so ist stets \(\Omega^* = \varepsilon \Omega\), wo \(\varepsilon\) eine Einheit des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) bedeutet, welche die Kongruenzeigenschaft \(\varepsilon = \pm 1\) nach \(\gothl = (1 -\zeta)\) besitzt. Umgekehrt, wenn \(\varepsilon\) eine Einheit dieser Art in \(k(\zeta)\) und \(\Omega\) für \(k\) irgend eine Wurzelzahl bezeichnet, so ist \(\Omega^* = \varepsilon \Omega\) stets wiederum eine Wurzelzahl jenes Abel’schen Körpers \(k\).

Satz 138.

Wenn die $l$te Potenz \(\Lambda^l\) der Lagrange’schen Wurzelzahl \(\Lambda\) gemäß Satz 135 durch die Formel

\[ \Lambda^l = \gothp^{r_0 r_{-1}s + r_{-2}s^2 + \cdots + r_{-l+2}s^{l-2}},\]

dargestellt wird, so ist \(\gothp\) das durch die Formel

\[ \gothp = (p, \zeta - R^{-m}), \qquad \left(m = \frac{p-1}l \right) \]

bestimmte Primideal; die Zeichen sind im übrigen wie in Satz 135 zu verstehen. Die Lagrange’sche Wurzelzahl \(\Lambda\) ist \(\equiv -1\) nach \(\gothl\) und hat ferner die Eigenschaft, dass ihr absoluter Betrag \(= |\sqrt{p}|\) ist.

Umgekehrt, wenn einer Wurzelzahl \(\Omega\) die letzteren Eigenschaften zukommen und außerdem \(\Omega^l\) gerade das soeben definierte Primideal \(\gothp\) zur ersten Potenz enthält, so ist \(\Omega = \zeta^*\Lambda\), wo \(\zeta^*\) eine $l$te Einheitswurzel bedeutet.

Kapitel XXV. Das Reziprozitätsgesetz für $l$te Potenzreste zwischen einer rationalen Zahl und einer Zahl des Körpers der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln

Satz 139.

Bedeutet \(\gothp\) ein von \(\gothl = (1- \zeta)\) verschiedenes Primideal und \(\alpha\) eine ganze zu \(\gothp\) prime Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\), so ist \(\alpha\) dann und nur dann $l$ter Potenzrest nach \(\gothp\), wenn \(\left\{ \frac{\alpha}\gothp \right\} = 1\) ausfällt.

Hilfssatz 21.

Es sei \(\zeta = e^{\frac{2i \pi}l}\); ferner bedeute \(p\) von \(l\) verschiedene rationale Primzahl von der Form \(p = ml + 1\), \(R\) eine Primitivzahl nach \(p\) und \(\gothp\) das Primideal ersten Grades in \(k(\zeta)\):

\[ \gothp = (p, \zeta - R^{-m}); \]

es werde \(Z = e^{\frac{2i \pi}p}\), die Lagrange’sche Wurzelzahl

\[ \Lambda = Z + \zeta Z^R + \zeta^2 Z^{R^2} + \cdots + \zeta^{p-2} Z^{R^{p-2}} \]

und \(\pi = \Lambda^l\) gesetzt. Endlich bedeute \(q\) eine beliebige, von \(l\) und \(p\) verschiedene rationale Primzahl, \(\gothq\) ein in \(q\) aufgehendes Primideal des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) und \(g\) den Grad von \(\gothq\): dann drückt sich der Potenzcharakter der Zahl \(\pi = \Lambda^l\) in Bezug auf des Ideal \(\gothq\) durch die Formel aus

\[ \left\{ \frac{\pi}\gothq\right\} = \left\{ \frac{q}\gothp \right\}^g . \]

Satz 140.

Wenn \(a\) eine beliebige ganze rationale, nicht durch die ungerade Primzahl \(l\) teilbare Zahl und \(\alpha\) eine beliebige semiprimäre und zu \(a\) prime ganze Zahl des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln ist, so gilt in diesem Körper die Reziprozitätsgleichung

\[ \left\{ \frac{a}\alpha \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\alpha}a \right\} . \]

Kapitel XXVI. Die Bestimmung der Anzahl der Idealklassen im Kreiskörper der $m$ten Einheitswurzeln

Satz 141.

Es sei \(m\) eine ganze rationale positive Zahl von der Gestalt

\[ m = l_1^{h_1} l_2^{h_2} \cdots, \, {\rm oder }\, = 2^2 l_1^{h_1} l_2^{h_2} \cdots, \, {\rm oder }\, 2^{h^*}l_1^{h_1} l_2^{h_2} \cdots \qquad (h^* > 2, h_1 > 0, h_2 > 0, \ldots), \]

wo \(l_1, l_2, \ldots\) von einander verschiedene ungerade Primzahlen bedeuten. Es seien ferner \(r_1, r_2, \ldots\) Primitivzahlen bez. nach \(l_1^{h_1}, l_2^{h_2}, \ldots\) und mit ihrer Hilfe die betreffenden Symbole definiert. Dann kann die Klassenanzahl \(H\) des Kreiskörpers \(k\) der $m$ten Einheitswurzeln auf folgende zwei Weisen ausgedrückt werden:

Der erste Ausdruck für \(H\) lautet:

\[ H = \frac{1}\kappa \prod_{(u_1, u_2, \ldots)} \lim_{s \to 1} \prod_{(p)} \frac{1}{1 - \left[ \overbrace{u_1, u_2, \ldots}^p \right] p^{-s}} \]

bez. entsteht aus dieser Formel, indem man \(u_1, u_2, \ldots\) durch \(u; u_1, u_2, \ldots\), bez. \(u, u^*; u_1, u_2, \ldots\) ersetzt. Hierin ist dann äußere Produkt \(\Pi\) über die Zahlen

\begin{align*} \tag{S. 141. Eq. 1} \label{s141eq1} \left\{ \begin{array}{lcl} u_1 &=& 0, 1, \ldots, l_1^{h_1 - 1}(l_1 - 1)-1 , \\ u_2 &=& 0, 1, \ldots, l_2^{h_2 - 1}(l_2 - 1)-1 , \\ &\vdots& \\ && {\rm ferner\, über} \\ u &=& 0, 1 \\ && {\rm und \, über }\\ u^*&=& 0, 1, \ldots, 2^{h^*-2}-1 \end{array} \right. \end{align*}

zu erstrecken mit Ausschluss der einen Wertverbindung \(u_1 = 0, u_2 = 0, \ldots\), bez. \(u = 0; u_1 = 0, u_2 = 0, \ldots\), bez. \(u = 0, u^*= 0; u_1 = 0, u_2 = 0, \ldots\); es besteht daher nur aus einer endlichen Anzahl von Faktoren. Jedes einzelne innere Produkt \(\prod_{(p)}\) soll über alle rationale Primzahlen \(p\) erstreckt werden und ist mithin ein unendliches Produkt. Die Größe \(\kappa\) ist die dem Körper \(k\) zugehörende Zahl des Satzes 56.

Der zweite Ausdruck für \(H\) ist ein Produkt aus zwei in Bruchform erscheinenden Faktoren und lautet:

\[ H = \frac{\prod_{(u_1, u_2, \ldots )} \sum_{(n)} \left[ \overbrace{u_1, u_2, \ldots}^n \right] n}{(2m)^{\frac{1}2 \Phi(m) -1}} \cdot \frac{\prod_{(u_1, u_2, \ldots )} \sum_{(n)} \left[ \overbrace{u_1, u_2, \ldots}^n \right] \log A_n}R \]

bez. entsteht aus dieser Formel, indem man zum ersten Bruch rechts den Faktor \(\frac{1}2\) hinzufügt und dann \(u_1, u_2, \ldots\) durch \(u; u_1, u_2, \ldots\) bez. \(u, u^*; u_1, u_2, \ldots\) ersetzt. Hierin soll das Produkt \(\Pi\) im Zähler des ersten Bruches über alle diejenigen in \eqref{s141eq1} angegebenen Werte erstreckt werden, für welche im ersten Falle \(u_1 + u_2 + \cdots\) bez. in dem zwei anderen Fällen \(u+u_1 + u_2 \cdots\) eine ungerade Zahl ist, während das Produkt \(\Pi\) im Zähler des zweiten Bruches über alle diejenigen in \eqref{s141eq1} angegebenen Werte zu erstrecken ist, für welche im ersten Falle \(u_1+u_2+\cdots\) bez. in den zwei anderen Fällen \(u+u_1+u_2+\cdots\) eine gerade Zahl ist, mit Ausschluss immer der einen Wertverbindung \(u_1 = 0, u_2 = 0, \ldots\), bez. \(u = 0; u_1 = 0, u_2 = 0, \ldots\), bez. \(u = 0, u^* = 0; u_1 = 0, u_2 = 0, \ldots\). Weiter ist jede einzelne Summe \(\sum_{(n)}\) in dem ersten Bruche über alle ganzen rationale positiven Zahlen \(n = 1, 2, \ldots, m-1\), jede einzelne Summe \(\sum_{(n)}\) in dem zweiten Bruche dagegen nur über alle diejenigen unter diesen Zahlen zu erstrecken, welche \(< \frac{m}2\) sind. Endlich bedeutet \(\log A_n\) den reellen Wert des Logarithmus der Kreiskörperzahl

\[ A_n = \sqrt{\left( 1 - e^{\frac{2i\pi n}m}\right)\left( 1 - e^{\frac{-2i\pi n}m}\right)} \]

und \(R\) den Regulator des Kreiskörpers.

Satz 142.

Ist \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl, so stellt sich die Klassenanzahl \(h\) des Kreiskörpers der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln, wie folgt, dar:

\[ h = \frac{\prod_{(u)} \sum_{(n)} n e^{\frac{2i \pi n^\prime u}{l-1}}}{(2l)^\frac{l-3}2} \cdot \frac{\Delta}R. \]

Hierin ist das Produkt \(\prod_{(n)}\) über die ungeraden Zahlen \(u = 1, 3, 5, \ldots, l-2\) und jede einzelne Summe \(\sum_{(n)}\) über die Zahlen \(n = 1, 3, 5, \ldots, l-1\) zu erstrecken; ferner ist eine Primitivzahl \(r\) nach \(l\) zu Grunde gelegt und man hat unter \(n^\prime\) eine solche zu \(n\) gehörige ganze rationale Zahl zu verstehen, für welche \(r^{n^\prime} \equiv n\) mach \(l\) wird. \(\Delta\) bedeutet die Determinante

\[ (-1)^{\frac{(l-3)(l-5)}8} \begin{vmatrix} \log \varepsilon_1 & \log \varepsilon_2 & \cdots & \log \varepsilon_{\frac{l-3}2} \\ \log \varepsilon_2 & \log \varepsilon_3 & \cdots & \log \varepsilon_{\frac{l-1}2} \\ \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots \\ \log \varepsilon_{\frac{l-3}2} & \log \varepsilon_{\frac{l-3}2} & \cdots & \log \varepsilon_{l-4} \end{vmatrix} ,\]

und dabei ist allgemein \(\log \varepsilon_g\) der reelle Wert des Logarithmus der Einheit

\[ \varepsilon_g = \sqrt{\frac{1 - \zeta^{r^g}}{1 - \zeta^{r^{g-1}}}\frac{1 - \zeta^{-r^g}}{1 - \zeta^{-r^{g-1}}}}, \]

wo \(\zeta\) für \(e^{\frac{2i \pi}l}\) steht.

Hilfssatz 22.

Ist \(p\) eine beliebige rationale Primzahl und \(m\) eine durch \(8\) teilbare Zahl, so gilt unter Anwendung der in Satz 141 erklärten Bezeichnungen für reelle Werte \(s > 1\) die Formel:

\[ \prod_{(\gothP)} \left( 1 - n(\gothP)^{-s} \right) = \prod_{(u, u^*; u_1, u_2, \ldots)} \left( 1 - \left[ \overbrace{u, u^*; u_1, u_2, \ldots}^p \right] p^{-s} \right) ,\]

wo das Produkt linker Hand über alle verschiedenen Primideale \(\gothP\) des Kreiskörpers \(k(e^{\frac{2i\pi}m})\) zu erstrecken ist, welche in der Primzahl \(p\) enthalten sind, und wo das Produkt rechter Hand über alle in \eqref{s141eq1} angegebenen Wertsysteme \(u, u^*; u_1, u_2, \ldots\) (das System \(u = 0, u^* = 0; u_1 = 0, u = 0, \ldots\) einbegriffen) genommen werden soll.

Satz 143.

Bedeuten \(m\) und \(n\) zwei zu einander prime ganze rationale Zahlen, so gibt es stets unendlich viele rationale Primzahlen \(p\) with der Kongruenzeigenschaft \(p \equiv n\) nach \(m\).

Satz 144.

jede Einheit eines Abel’schen Körpers ist eine Wurzel mit rationalem ganzzahligem Exponenten aus einem Produkt von Kreiseinheiten.

Kapitel XXVII. Anwendungen der Theorie des Kreiskörpers auf den quadratischen Körper

Satz 145.

Wenn \(l\) eine rationale Primzahl mit der Kongruenzeigenschaft \(l\equiv 3\) nach \(4\) ist und \(p\) eine rationale Primzahl von der Gestalt \(p = ml+1\) bedeutet, so gilt für ein jedes in \(p\) aufgehende Primideal \(\gothp\) des imaginären quadratischen Körpers \(k(\sqrt{-l})\) die Äquivalenz

\[ \gothp^{\frac{\sum b - \sum a}l} \sim 1, \]

wo \(\sum a\) die Summe der kleinsten positiven quadratischen Reste und \(\sum b\) die Summe der kleinsten positiven quadratischen Nichtreste nach \(l\) bedeutet.

Setzt man ferner \(p = \gothp \gothp^\prime\) und

\[ \gothp^{\frac{\sum b - \sum a}l} = (\pi), \]

wobei \(\pi\) eine ganze Zahl des imaginären quadratischen Körpers \(k(\sqrt{-l})\) bedeutet, so gilt die Kongruenz

\[ \pi \equiv \pm \frac{1}{\prod_{(a)} (am)!} \bmod (\gothp^\prime), \]

wo das im Nenner stehende Produkt über alle kleinsten positiven quadratischen Reste \(a\) nach \(l\) zu erstrecken ist.

Satz 146.

Die Lagrange’sche Wurzelzahl \(\Lambda\) des quadratischen Körpers mit der Primzahldiskriminante \((-1)^{\frac{p-1}2}p\) ist eine positiv reelle oder positiv rein imaginäre Zahl.

Kapitel XXVIII. Die Zerlegung der Zahlen des Kreiskörpers im Kummer’schen Körper

Satz 147.

Der durch \(M = \sqrt[l]{\mu}\) und \(\zeta\) bestimmte Kummer’sche Körper ist im Bereiche der rationale Zahlen dann und nur dann ein Galois’scher Körper, wenn unter den symbolischen Potenzen \(\mu^{s-1}, \mu^{s-2}, \ldots, \mu^{s-l+1}\) eine die $l$te Potenz einer Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) wird. Dabei ist \(s = (\zeta: \zeta^r)\), worin \(r\) eine Primitivzahl nach \(l\) bedeutet.

Der Kummer’sche Körper \(k(M, \zeta)\) ist insbesondere dann und nur dann ein Abel’scher Körper, wenn \(\mu^{s-r}\) die $l$te Potenz einer Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) wird.

Hilfssatz 23.

Wenn ein Primideal \(\gothp\) des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) gleich der $l$ten Potenz eines Primideals \(\gothP\) des Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) wird und \(A\) eine ganze durch \(\gothP\), aber nicht durch \(\gothP^2\) teilbare Zahl in \(k(M,\zeta)\) ist, so enthalten die Relativdiskriminante der Zahl \(A\) und die Relativdiskriminante des Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) in Bezug auf \(k(\zeta)\) genau die gleiche Potenz von \(\gothp\) als Faktor.

Satz 148.

Es werde \(\lambda = 1 - \zeta\) und \(\gothl = (\lambda)\) gesetzt. Geht ein von \(\gothl\) verschiedenes Primideal \(\gothp\) des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) in der Zahl \(\mu\) genau zur $e$ten Potenz auf, so enthält, wenn der Exponent \(e\) zu \(l\) prim ist, die Relativdiskriminante des durch \(M = \sqrt[l]{\mu}\) und \(\zeta\) bestimmten Kummer’schen Körpers in Bezug auf \(k(\zeta)\) genau die Potenz \(\gothp^{l-1}\) von \(\gothp\) als Faktor. Ist dagegen der Exponent \(e\) ein Vielfaches von \(l\), so fällt diese Relativdiskriminante prim zu \(\gothp\) aus.

Was das Primideal \(\gothl\) betrifft, so können wir zunächst den Umstand ausschließen, dass die Zahl \(\mu\) durch \(\gothl\) teilbar ist und dabei \(\gothl\) genau in einer solchen Potenz enthält, deren Exponent ein Vielfaches von \(l\) ist; denn alsdann könnte die Zahl \(\mu\) sofort durch eine zu \(\gothl\) prime Zahl \(\mu^*\) ersetzt werden, so dass \(k(\sqrt[l]{\mu^*}, \zeta)\) derselbe Körper wie \(k(\sqrt[l]{\mu}, \zeta)\) ist. Unter Ausschluss des genannten Umstandes haben wir die zwei möglichen Fälle, dass \(\mu\) genau eine Potenz von \(\gothl\) enthält, deren Exponent zu \(l\) prim ist, oder dass \(\mu\) nicht durch \(l\) teilbar ist. Im ersteren Falle ist die Relativdiskriminante von \(k(\sqrt[l]{\mu}, \zeta)\) in Bezug auf \(k(\zeta)\) genau durch die Potenz \(\gothl^{l^2-1}\) von \(\gothl\) teilbar. Im zweiten Falle sei \(m\) der höchste Exponent \(\leq l\), für den es eine Zahl \(\alpha\) in \(k(\zeta)\) gibt, so dass \(\mu \equiv \alpha^l\) mach \(\gothl^m\) ausfällt. Jene Relativdiskriminante ist dann im Falle \(m = l\) zu \(\gothl\) prim; sie ist dagegen im Falle \(m < l\) genau durch die Potenz \(\gothl^{(l-1)(l-m+1)}\) von \(\gothl\) teilbar.

Satz 149.

Ein beliebiges Primideal \(\gothp\) in \(k(\zeta)\) ist in dem durch \(M = \sqrt[l]{\mu}\) und \(\zeta\) bestimmten Kummer’schen Körper \(k(M, \zeta)\) entweder gleich der $l$ten Potenz eines Primideals oder zerlegbar in \(l\) von einander verschiedene Primideale oder selbst Primideal, je nachdem \(\left\{ \frac{\mu}\gothp \right\} = 0\) oder \(= 1\) oder gleich einer von \(1\) verschiedenen $l$ten Einheitswurzel ausfällt.

Kapitel XXIX. Die Normenreste und Normennichtreste des Kummer’schen Körpers

Satz 150.

Wenn \(\gothw\) ein Primideal des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) ist, das nicht in der Relativdiskriminante des Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) aufgeht, so ist jede zu \(\gothw\) prime Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) Normenrest des Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) nach \(\gothw\).

Wenn dagegen \(\gothw\) ein Primideal des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) ist, das in der Relativdiskriminante des Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) aufgeht, und \(e\) im Falle \(\gothw \neq \gothl\) ein beliebiger positiver Exponent, im Falle \(\gothw = \gothl\) ein beliebiger Exponent \(> l\) bedeutet, so sind von allen vorhandenen, zu \(\gothw\) primen und nach \(\gothw^e\) einander inkongruenten Zahlen in \(k(\zeta)\) genau der $l$te Teil Normenreste nach \(\gothw\).

Hilfssatz 24.

Wenn \(\omega\) eine ganze Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) mit der Kongruenzeigenschaft \(\omega \equiv 1\) nach \(\gothl\) ist, so gilt für die Norm \(n(\omega)\) von \(\omega\) in \(k(\zeta)\) die Kongruenz

\[ {\rm l}^{(l-1)} (\omega) \equiv \frac{1 - n(\omega)}l \bmod (l) . \]

Hilfssatz 25.

Wenn die ganzen Zahlen \(\nu, \mu\) in \(k(\zeta)\) die Kongruenzeigenschaft \(\nu \equiv 1\) nach \(\gothl\) und \(\mu \equiv 1 + \lambda\) nach \(\gothl^2\) besitzen, und wenn außerdem \(\nu\) kongruent der Relativnorm einer ganzen Zahl \(A\) des durch \(M = \sqrt[l]{\mu}\) bestimmten Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) nach \(\gothl^l\) ist, so existiert eine ganzzahlige Funktion \(f(x)\) vom $(l-1)$ten Grade in \(x\), derart, dass \(f(1) > 0\) ist und die Kongruenzen

\[ n(f(\zeta)) \equiv 1 \bmod (l^2) \]

und

\[ \nu \equiv f(\nu) \bmod (\gothl^l) \]

erfüllt sind.

Hilfssatz 26.

Wenn \(\nu, \mu\) ganze Zahlen in \(k(\zeta)\) mit den Kongruenzeigenschaft \(\nu \equiv 1\) mach \(\gothl\) und \(\mu \equiv 1 + \lambda\) nach \(\gothl^2\) bedeuten, und wenn außerdem \(\nu\) Normenrest des durch \(M = \sqrt[l]{\mu}\) bestimmten Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) nach \(\gothl\) ist, so wird stets

\[ \left\{ \frac{\nu, \mu}\gothl \rigth\} = 1 . \]

Satz 151.

Wenn \(\nu, \mu\) zwei beliebige ganze Zahlen in \(k(\zeta)\) sind, nur dass \(\sqrt[l]{\mu}\) nicht in \(k(\zeta)\) liegt, und wenn \(\gothw\) ein beliebiges Primideal des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) bedeutet, so ist \(\nu\) Normenrest oder Normennichtrest des durch \(M = \sqrt[l]{\mu}\) bestimmten Kummer’schen Körpers \(k(M, \zeta)\) nach \(\gothw\), je nachdem

\[ \left\{ \frac{\nu, \mu}\gothw \right\} = 1 \, {\rm oder } \, \neq 1 \]

ausfällt.

Kapitel XXX. Das Vorhandensein unendlich vieler Primideale mit vorgeschriebenen Potenzcharakteren im Kummer’schen Körper

Hilfssatz 27.

Bedeutet \(l\) eine ungerade rationale Primzahl und \(\alpha\) in dem durch \(\zeta = e^\frac{2i \pi}l\) bestimmten Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) eine beliebige ganze Zahl, nur nicht die $l$te Potenz einer in \(k(\zeta)\) liegenden Zahl, so ist der Grenzwert

\[ \lim_{s \to 1} \prod_{(\gothp)} \prod_{(m)} \frac{1}{ 1 - \left\{ \frac{\alpha}\gothp \right\}^m n(\gothp)^{-s} } \]

stets eine endliche und von \(0\) verschiedene Größe; dabei soll das Produkt \(\prod_{(\gothp)}\) über alle Primideale \(\gothp\) des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) und das Produkt \(\prod_{(m)}\) über alle Exponenten \(m\) aus der Reihe \(1, 2, \ldots, l-1\) erstreckt werden.

Satz 152.

Es seien \(\alpha_1, \ldots, \alpha_t\) irgend \(t\) ganze Zahlen des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\), welche die Bedingung erfüllen, dass das Produkt

\[ \alpha_1^{m_1} \alpha_2^{m_2} \cdots \alpha_t^{m_t} , \]

wenn man jeden der Exponenten \(m_1, m_2, \ldots, m_t\) die Werte \(0, 1, 2, \ldots, l-1\) durchlaufen lässt, jedoch das eine Wertsystem \(m_1 = 0, m_2 = 0, \ldots, m_t = 0\) ausschließt, dabei niemals die $l$te Potenz einer Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) wird; es seien ferner \(\gamma_1, \gamma_2, \ldots, \gamma_t\) nach Belieben vorgeschriebene $l$te Einheitswurzeln: dann gibt es im Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) stets unendlich viele Primideale \(\gothp\), für die jedes mal bei einem gewissen zu \(l\) primen Exponenten \(m\)

\[ \left\{ \frac{\alpha_1}\gothp \right\}^m = \gamma_1, \left\{ \frac{\alpha_2}\gothp \right\}^m = \gamma_2, \ldots, \left\{ \frac{\alpha_t}\gothp \right\}^m = \gamma_t \]

wird.

Kapitel XXXI. Der reguläre Kreiskörper

Satz 153.

Es sei \(k(\zeta)\) ein regulärer Kreiskörper und \(K\) ein aus \(k(\zeta)\) entspringender Kummer’scher Körper: wenn dann ein Ideal \(\gothj\) des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) in dem Körper \(K\) Hauptideal ist, so ist das Ideal \(\gothj\) auch in dem Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) selbst ein Hauptideal.

Hilfssatz 28.

Ist \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl und \(k(\zeta)\) der Kreiskörper der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln, so ist der erste Faktor der Klassenanzahl von \(k(\zeta)\) dann und nur dann durch \(l\) teilbar, wenn \(l\) im Zähler einer der ersten \(l^* = \frac{l-3}2\) Bernoulli’schen Zahlen aufgeht.

Hilfssatz 29.

Wenn \(l\) eine ungerade Primzahl bedeutet, welche in den Zählern der ersten \(l^* = \frac{l-3}2\) Bernoulli’schen Zahlen nicht aufgeht, so lässt sich aus den Kreiseinheiten des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln stets durch Bildung geeigneter Produkte und Quotienten ein System von solchen \(l^*\) Einheiten \(\varepsilon_1, \ldots, \varepsilon_{l^*}\) ableiten, für welche \(l^*\) Kongruenzen von der Gestalt

\begin{align*} \left\{ \begin{array}{lcl} \varepsilon_1 &=& 1+ a_1 \lambda^2 \bmod (\gothl^3), \\ \varepsilon_2 &=& 1+ a_2 \lambda^4 \bmod (\gothl^5), \\ \varepsilon_3 &=& 1+ a_3 \lambda^6 \bmod (\gothl^7), \\ &\vdots & \\ \varepsilon_{l^*} &=& 1+ a_{l^*} \lambda^{l-3} \bmod (\gothl^{l-2}) \end{array} \right. \end{align*}

gelten, wo \(a_1, a_2, \ldots, a_{l^*}\) ganze rationale, durch \(l\) nicht teilbare Zahlen bedeuten; dabei ist \(\lambda = 1 - \zeta\), \(\gothl = (\lambda)\) gesetzt.

Satz 154.

Eine ungerade Primzahl \(l\) ist dann und nur dann regulär, wenn sie in den Zählern der ersten \(l^* = \frac{l-3}2\) Bernoulli’schen Zahlen nicht aufgeht.

Satz 155.

Ist \(l\) eine reguläre Primzahl, so gibt es im Kreiskörper der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln stets ein System von \(l^* = \frac{l-3}2\) unabhängigen Einheiten \(\bar{\varepsilon}_1, \ldots, \bar{\varepsilon}_{l^*}\) von der Art, dass für dieselben die Kongruenzen

\begin{align*} \bar{\varepsilon}_1 &\equiv 1 + \lambda^2 \bmod (\gothl^3), \\ \bar{\varepsilon}_2 &\equiv 1 + \lambda^4 \bmod (\gothl^5), \\ & \ldots \\ \bar{\varepsilon}_{l^*} &\equiv 1 + \lambda^{l-3} \bmod (\gothl^{l-2}) \end{align*}

erfüllt sind; dabei ist \(\lambda = 1 - \zeta\), \(\gothl = (\lambda)\) gesetzt.

Satz 156.

Wenn \(l\) eine reguläre Primzahl bedeutet und im Körper \(k(\zeta)\) der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln eine solche Einheit \(E\) vorliegt, welche einer ganzen rationalen Zahl nach \(l\) kongruent ist, so ist sie notwendig die $l$te Potenz einer Einheit dieses Kreiskörpers.

Satz 157.

In einem regulären Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) kann eine beliebige zu \(\gothl\) prime ganze Zahl \(\alpha\) stets durch Multiplikation mit einer Einheit in eine primäre Zahl verwandelt werden.

Hilfssatz 30.

Wenn \(nu, \mu\) zwei primäre Zahlen des regulären Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) sind, so ist stets

\[ \left\{ \frac{\nu, \mu}\gothl \right\} = 1. \]

Kapitel XXXII. Die ambigen Idealklassen und die Geschlechter im regulären Kummer’schen Körper

Hilfssatz 31.

Es sei der Relativgrad \(l\) eines relativ zyklischen Körpers \(K\) in Bezug auf einen Unterkörper \(k\) eine ungerade Primzahl, ferner sei \(S\) eine von der identischen verschiedene Substitution der Relativgruppe von \(K\) in Bezug auf \(k\) und \(H_1, \ldots, H_{r+1}\) ein System von relativen Grundeinheiten des Körpers \(K\) in Bezug auf \(k\), dann gilt für eine beliebige Einheit \(E\) in \(K\) jedes mal eine Gleichung von der Gestalt

\[ E^f = H_1^{F_1(S)} \cdots H_{r+1}^{F_{r+1}(S)} [\varepsilon], \]

wo \(f\) ein ganzer rationaler, nicht durch \(l\) teilbarer Exponent ist, \(F_1(S), \ldots, F_{r+1}(S)\) ganzzahlige Funktionen vom $(l-2)$ten Grade in \(S\) bezeichnen und \([\varepsilon]\) eine Einheit in \(K\) bedeutet, deren $l$te Potenz in \(k\) liegt.

Hilfssatz 32.

Es mögen dieselben Bezeichnungen wie in Hilfssatz 31 gelten, und überdies bilden wir die Relativnormen der \(r+1\) relativen Grundeinheiten des relativ zyklischen Körpers \(K\), nämlich

\[ \eta_1 = N_k(H_1), \ldots, \eta_{r+1} = N_k(H_{r+1}) : \]

dann lässt sich jede Einheit \(\varepsilon\) in \(k\), welche die Relativnorm einer Einheit \(E\) des Körpers \(K\) ist, in der Gestalt

\[ \varepsilon = \eta_1^{u_1} \cdots \eta_{r+1}^{u_{r+1}} [\varepsilon]^l \]

darstellen, wo \(u_1, \ldots, u_{r+1}\) ganze rationale Exponenten sind und \([\varepsilon]\) eine Einheit in \(K\) ist.

Satz 158.

Es sei \(t\) die Anzahl der verschiedenen Primideale, welche in der Relativdiskriminante des regulären Kummer’schen Zahlkörpers \(K(\sqrt[l]{\mu}, \zeta)\) vom Relativgrade \(l\) aufgehen; ferner mögen die Relativnormen aller Einheiten von \(K\) für \(k(\zeta)\) eine Einheitenschar vom Grade \(m\) bilden: betrachten wir dann alle diejenigen Klassen, in welchen sei es ambige Ideale des Körpers \(K\), sei es Produkte von ambigen Idealen in \(K\) mit Idealen in \(k(\zeta)\) vorkommen, so bilden eine Klassenschar vom Grade

\[ t + m - \frac{l+1}2 . \]

Satz 159.

Es sei \(t\) die Anzahl der Primideale, die in der Relativdiskriminante des regulären Kummer’schen Körpers \(K\) vom Relativgrade \(l\) aufgehen; ferner mögen alle diejenigen Einheiten in \(k(\zeta)\), welche gleich Relativnormen sei es von Einheiten, sei es von gebrochenen Zahlen des Körpers \(K\) sind, eine Einheitenschar vom Grade \(n\) bilden: dann besitzt die aus sämtlichen ambigen Klassen bestehende Klassenschar den Grade \(t + n - \frac{l+1}2\).

Satz 160.

Die ideale ein und derselben Klasse eines regulären Kummer’schen Körpers besitzen sämtlich dasselbe Charakterensystem.

Hilfssatz 33.

Wenn \(t\) und \(n\) die Bedeutung wie in Satz 159 haben und \(r\) die Anzahl der Charaktere ist, welche das Geschlecht einer Klasse des Kummer’schen Körpers bestimmen, so ist stets

\[ t + n - \frac{l+1}2 \leq r - 1. \]

Hilfssatz 34.

Wenn \(t\) und \(n\) die Bedeutung wie in Satz 159 haben und \(g\) die Anzahl der Geschlechter des regulären Kummer’schen Körpers \(K\) bezeichnet, so fällt stets \(g \leq l^{t + n -\frac{l+1}2}\) aus.

Hilfssatz 35.

Wenn in einem regulären Kummer’schen Körper \(r\) die Anzahl der Charaktere ist, welche das Geschlecht einer Klasse bestimmen, so ist die Anzahl der Geschlechter jenes Körpers \(g \leq l^{r-1}\).

Kapitel XXXIII. Das Reziprozitätsgesetz für $l$te Potenzreste im regulären Kreiskörper

Satz 161.

Sind \(\gothp\) und \(\gothq\) von einander und von dem Primideal \(\gothl\) verschiedene Primideale des regulären Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\), so gilt die Regel

\[ \left\{ \frac{\gothp}\gothq \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\gothq}\gothp \right\} , \]

das sogenannte Reziprozitätsgesetz für $l$te Potenzreste. Außerdem gelten, wenn \(\xi\) eine beliebige Einheit in \(k(\zeta)\) und \(\pi\) eine Primär Zahl von dem Primideal \(\gothp\) bedeutet, die Regeln

\[ \left\{ \frac{\xi}\gothp \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\pi, \xi}\gothl \right\} , \left\{ \frac{\lambda}\gothp \right\} = \left\{\frac{\pi,\lambda}\gothl \right\} , \]

die beiden sogenannte Ergänzungssätze zum Reziprozitätsgesetz für $l$te Potenzreste.

Hilfssatz 36.

Wenn \(\xi\) und \(\varepsilon\) beliebige Einheiten des regulären Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) sind und \(\lambda = 1 - \zeta\), \(\gothl = (\lambda)\) gesetzt wird, so gelten stets die Gleichungen

\[ \left\{ \frac{\xi, \varepsilon}\gothl \right\} = 1, \left\{ \frac{\lambda, \varepsilon}\gothl \right\} = 1. \]

Hilfssatz 37.

Wenn \(\gothp\) ein Primideal erster Art und \(\pi\) eine Primär Zahl von \(\gothp\) ist, so gibt es in \(k(\zeta)\) stets wenigstens eine Einheit \(\varepsilon\), für welche

\[ \left\{ \frac{\varepsilon, \pi}\gothl \right\} \neq 1 \]

ausfällt; ist dagegen eine Primideal \(\gothq\) zweiter Art vorgelegt und bedeutet \(\kappa\) eine Primär Zahl von \(\gothq\), so gilt für jede Einheit \(\xi\) in \(k(\zeta)\) die Gleichung

\[ \left\{ \frac{\xi, \kappa}\gothl \right\} = 1 . \]

Hilfssatz 38.

Es sei \(\gothp\) ein Primideal erster Art im regulären Kreiskörper \(k(\zeta)\) und \(\pi\) eine Primär Zahl von \(\gothp\). Wenn es dann eine Einheit \(\varepsilon\) in \(k(\zeta)\) gibt, so dass

\[ \left\{ \frac{\pi, \varepsilon}\gothl \right\} \neq 1, \left\{ \frac{\varepsilon}\gothp \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\pi, \varepsilon}\gothl \right\} \]

statthat, so gilt für jede beliebige Einheit \(\xi\) in \(k(\zeta)\) die Gleichung:

\[ \left\{ \frac{\xi}\gothp \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\pi, \xi}\gothl \right\} . \]

Hilfssatz 39.

Wenn \(\gothp, \gothp^*\) zwei Primideale erster Art in \(k(\zeta)\) und \(\pi, \pi^*\) Primär Zahlen bez. von \(\gothp, \gothp^*\) sind, wenn ferner für jede beliebige Einheit \(\xi\) in \(k(\zeta)\)

\[ \left\{ \frac{\xi}\gothp \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\pi, \xi}\gothl \right\}, \left\{ \frac{\xi}{\gothp^*} \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\pi^*, \xi}\gothl \right\} \]

wird, so ist

\[ \left\{ \frac{\gothp}{\gothp^*} \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\gothp^*}\gothp \right\} . \]

Hilfssatz 40.

Wenn \(\gothp\) ein Primideal erster Art in \(k(\zeta)\) ist und \(\pi\) eine Primär Zahl von \(\gothp\) bedeutet, und wenn für jede beliebige Einheit \(\xi\) in \(k(\zeta)\) die Gleichung

\[ \left\{ \frac{\xi}\gothp \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\pi, \xi}\gothl \right\} \]

besteht, wenn ferner \(\gothp^*\) ein solches von \(\gothp\) verschiedenes Primideal erster Art ist, dass

\[ \left\{ \frac{\gothp}{\gothp^*} \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\gothp^*}\gothp \right\} \neq 1 \]

ausfällt, so gibt es stets eine Einheit \(\varepsilon\) in \(k(\zeta)\) von der Art, dass

\[ \left\{ \frac{\varepsilon}{\gothp^*} \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\pi^*,\varepsilon}\gothl \right\} \neq 1 \]

wird, wobei \(\pi^*\) eine Primär Zahl von \(\gothp^*\) bezeichnet.

Satz 162.

Wenn \(\gothp\) und \(\gothq\) irgend zwei beliebige Primideale eines regulären Kreiskörpers sind, für welche \(\left\{ \frac{\gothp}\gothq \right\} = 1\) gilt, so ist stets auch \(\left\{ \frac{\gothq}\gothp \right\} = 1\).

Hilfssatz 41.

Wenn \(\gothp\) ein beliebiges Primideal des regulären Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) bedeutet, so gibt es stets ein Primideal \(\gothr\) in \(k(\zeta)\), welches den Bedingungen

\[ \left\{ \frac{\zeta}\gothr \right\} \neq 1, \left\{ \frac{\gothp}\gothr \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\gothr}\gothp \right\} \neq 1 \]

genügt.

Hilfssatz 42.

Wenn \(\gothp\) ein beliebiges Primideal des regulären Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) und \(\pi\) eine Primär Zahl von \(\gothp\) bedeutet, wenn ferner \(\varepsilon\) eine beliebige Einheit in \(k(\zeta)\), nur nicht die $l$te Potenz einer Einheit in \(k(\zeta)\) ist, so gibt es ein Primideal \(\gothr\) in \(k(\zeta)\), das den Bedingungen

\[ \left\{ \frac{\varepsilon \pi}\gothr \right\} = 1, \left\{ \frac{\gothp}\gothr \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\gothr}\gothp \right\} \neq 1 \]

genügt.

Kapitel XXXIV. Die Anzahl der vorhandenen Geschlechter im regulären Kummer’schen Körper

Satz 163.

Wenn \(\nu\) und \(\mu\) zwei beliebige ganze Zahlen (\(\neq 0\)) eines regulären Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) bedeuten, so ist stets

\[ \prod_{(\gothw)} \left\{ \frac{\nu, \mu}\gothw \right\} = 1, \]

wenn das Produkt linker Hand über sämtliche Primideale \(\gothw\) in \(k(\zeta)\) erstreckt wird.

Satz 164.

Es sei \(r\) die Anzahl der Charaktere, welche ein Geschlecht im regulären Kummer’schen Körper \(K = k(\sqrt[l]{\mu}, \zeta)\) bestimmen; ist dann eine System von \(r\) beliebigen $l$ten Einheitswurzeln vorgelegt, so ist dieses System dann und nur dann das Charakterensystem eines Geschlechtes in \(K\), wenn das Produkt der sämtlichen \(r\) Einheitswurzeln gleich \(1\) ist. Die Anzahl der in \(K\) vorhandenen Geschlechter ist daher gleich \(l^{r-1}\).

Satz 165.

Die Anzahl \(g\) der Geschlechter in einem regulären Kummer’schen Körper ist gleich der Anzahl seiner ambigen Komplexe.

Satz 166.

Jeder Komplex des Hauptgeschlechtes in einem regulären Kummer’schen Körper \(K\) ist die $(1-S)$te symbolische Potenz eines Komplexes in \(K\), d.h. jede Klasse des Hauptgeschlechtes in einem regulären Kummer’schen Körper \(K\) ist gleich dem Produkt aus der $(1-S)$ten symbolischen Potenz einer Klasse und aus einer solchen Klasse, welche Ideale des Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) enthält.

Satz 167.

Wenn \(\nu, \mu\) zwei ganze Zahlen des regulären Kreiskörpers \(k(\zeta)\) bedeuten, von denen \(\mu\) nicht die $l$te Potenz einer ganzen Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) ist, und welche für jedes Primideal \(\gothw\) in \(k(\zeta)\) die Bedingung

\[ \left\{ \frac{\nu, \mu}\gothw \right\} = 1 \]

erfüllen, so ist die Zahl \(\nu\) stets gleich der Relativnorm einer ganzen oder gebrochenen Zahl \(A\) des Kummer’schen Körpers \(K = k(\sqrt[l]{\mu}, \zeta)\).

Kapitel XXXV. Neue Begründung der Theorie des regulären Kummer’schen Körpers

Hilfssatz 43.

Eine jede Primär Zahl \(\kappa\) eines Primideals \(\gothq\) der zweiten Art ist der $l$ten Potenz einer ganzen Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) nach \(\gothl^l\) kongruent.

Hilfssatz 44.

Es sei \(\gothq\) ein Primideal zweiter Art und \(\gothr\) ein Primideal erster oder zweiter Art in \(k(\zeta)\); wenn dann \(\left\{ \frac{\gothq}\gothr \right\} = 1\) ist, so wird auch \(\left\{ \frac{\gothr}\gothq \right\} = 1\).

Hilfssatz 45.

Wenn \(\gothq, \bar{\gothq}\) irgend zwei Primideale zweiter Art in \(k(\zeta)\) sind, so ist stets \(\left\{ \frac{\gothq}{\bar{\gothq}} \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\bar{\gothq}}\gothq \right\}\).

Hilfssatz 46.

Es sei \(\gothp\) ein Primideal der ersten Art und \(\gothq\) ein Primideal der zweiten Art in \(k(\zeta)\); wenn dann \(\left\{ \frac{\gothp}\gothq \right\} = 1\) ausfällt, so wird auch \(\left\{ \frac{\gothq}\gothp \right\} = 1\).

Hilfssatz 47.

Wenn \(\gothq\) ein Primideal zweiter Art und \(\gothp\) ein Primideal erster Art ist, so folgt stets \(\left\{ \frac{\gothq}\gothp \right\} = \left\{ \frac{\gothp}\gothq \right\}\).

Hilfssatz 48.

Wenn \(\nu, \mu\) zu \(\gothl\) prime ganze Zahlen sind und überdies \(\mu\) der $l$ten Potenz einer ganzen Zahl in \(k(\zeta)\) nach \(\gothl^l\) kongruent wird, so ist stets

\[ \prod_{(\gothw)} \left\{ \frac{\nu, \mu}\gothw \right\} = 1, \]

wo das Produkt über alle von \(\gothl\) verschiedenen Primideale \(\gothw\) in \(k(\zeta)\) erstreckt werden soll.

Hilfssatz 49.

Wenn \(\nu, \mu\) zwei primäre Zahlen des Körpers \(k(\zeta)\) sind, so hat das Symbol \(\{\nu, \mu\}\) stets den Wert \(1\).

Kapitel XXXVI. Die Diophantische Gleichung \(\alpha^m + \beta^m + \gamma^m = 0\)

Satz 168.

Wenn \(l\) eine reguläre Primzahl bedeutet und \(\alpha, \beta, \gamma\) irgend welche ganze Zahlen des Kreiskörpers der $l$ten Einheitswurzeln sind, von denen keine verschwindet, so besteht niemals die Gleichung

\[ \alpha^l + \beta^l + \gamma^l = 0. \]

Satz 169.

Wenn \(\alpha, \beta, \gamma\) ganze Zahlen des durch \(i = \sqrt{-1}\) bestimmten quadratischen Körpers sind, von denen keine verschwindet, so gilt niemals die Gleichung

\[ \alpha^4 + \beta^4 = \gamma^2. \]

Artin, Abstract Algebra

  • Isomorphism theorems. There are isomorphism theorems on groups, rings and modules.
    • Group version.
      • (First Isomorphism Theorem) Given a group \(G\) and a group homomorphism \(\varphi : G \to H\), we have
        • the kernel of \(\varphi\) is a normal subgroup of \(G\);
        • the image of \(\varphi\) is a subgroup of \(H\);
        • the image of \(\varphi\) is isomorphic to \(G/{\rm ker}\,\varphi\).
      • (Second Isomorphism Theorem) Given a group \(G\) and its subgroup \(H\), normal subgroup \(N\), we have
        • the product \(HN\) is a subgroup of \(G\);
        • the intersection \(H \cap N\) is a normal subgroup of \(H\);
        • the quotient \(HN/N\) is isomorphic to \(H/(H\cap N)\).

Chapter 2 Groups

Chapter 9 Group Representations

Chapter 10 Rings

Chapter 11 Factorization

Dummit and Foote, Abstract Algebra

Problem 1. Consider \(R=\ZZ[\sqrt{-5}]\) with norm \(N(a+b\sqrt{-5}) = a^2+5b^2\).

  • Show \(N(xy)=N(x)N(y)\), i.e., norm is multiplicative.

    Proof. Let

    \begin{align*} x &= a + b\sqrt{-5}, \\ y &= c + d\sqrt{-5}, \end{align*}

    where \(a, b, c, d \in \ZZ\), \(x, y \in \ZZ[\sqrt{-5}]\).

    Then we have

    \begin{align*} N(xy) &= N\left( (a + b\sqrt{-5})(c + d\sqrt{-5}) \right)\\ &= N\left( (ac-5bd) + (bc+ad) \sqrt{-5} \right)\\ &= (ac-5bd)^2 + 5(bc+ad)^2, \end{align*}

    by the definition of the given norm. On the other hand,

    \begin{align*} N(x)N(y) &= N(a+b\sqrt{-5})N(c+d\sqrt{-5}) \\ &= (a^2+5b^2)(c^2+5d^2). \end{align*}

    We can easily check

    \begin{align*} N(xy) - N(x)N(y) = 0, \end{align*}

    i.e., \(N(xy) = N(x)N(y)\) as desired. Q.E.D.

  • Show \(x \in R\) is a unit if and only if \(N(x) = 1\). Find all units in \(R\).

    Proof. (\(\Rightarrow\)) If \(x \in R\) is a unit, then there exists an element \(x^{-1} \in R\) such that \(x x^{-1} = x^{-1} x = 1\) under multiplication.

    Let \(x = a + b\sqrt{-5}\), \(a, b \in \ZZ\). Then we have

    \begin{align*} x^{-1} &= \frac{1}{a+b\sqrt{-5}} \\ &= \frac{a}{a^2+5b^2} + \frac{-b}{a^2+5b^2}\sqrt{-5}. \end{align*}

    Then \(a^2+5b^2=1\) since \(x^{-1} \in R\) implies \(\frac{a}{a^2+5b^2}, \frac{-b}{a^2+5b^2} \in \ZZ\). (For example, \(\frac{a}{a^2+5b^2}\) is at most \(1\) and it is an integer; so it must be \(\pm 1\).) This is exactly the same as \(N(x) = a^2+5b^2=1\).

    Alternatively, by multiplicativity of norm we just proved in the previous problem, \(1 = N(1) = N(x)N(x^{-1}) = N(x^{-1})N(x)\). Since \(1 \in \ZZ\) has only trivial factorization \(1 = 1\cdot 1 = (-1) \cdot (-1)\) and norm \(N\) is non negative here, we must have \(N(x) = 1\).

    (\(\Leftarrow\)) If \(N(x) = 1\), with the definition of norm \(N(x) = a^2+5b^2\), \(a, b \in \ZZ\), we must have \(a = 1, b = 0\) or \(a = -1, b = 0\). Therefore \(x = \pm 1\). They are units since

    • if \(x = 1\), then take \(x^{-1} = 1\), \(xx^{-1} = 1\) and
    • if \(x = -1\), then take \(x^{-1} = -1\), \(xx^{-1} = 1\).

    They are the only units by \((\Rightarrow)\) direction.

  • Show \(2, 3, 1+\sqrt{-5}, 1-\sqrt{-5}\) are irreducible in \(R\).

    Proof. First consider the case of \(2\). Assume \(2\) factors into \((a+b\sqrt{-5})(c+d\sqrt{-5})\) with \(a, b, c, d \in \ZZ\). Take the norm of \(2\) and by multiplicativity

    \begin{align*} N(2) &= 2^2 \\ &= N(a+b\sqrt{-5})N(c+d\sqrt{-5}) \\ &= (a^2+5b^2)(c^2+5d^2), \end{align*}

    i.e., \(4 = a^2c^2+5b^2c^2+5a^2d^2+25b^2d^2\). Note that \(b, d\) cannot be both nonzero otherwise the right hand side \(\geq 25b^2d^2 \geq 25 > 4\).

    Without loss of generality, assume \(b=0\). Note \(a\neq 0\),

    • if \(d = 0\), then \(ac = 2\), we have \(a = \pm 1\), \(c = \pm 2\) or \(a = \pm 2\), \(c = \pm 1\) and
    • if \(d\neq 0\), then \(5a^2d^2 \geq 5 > 4\), there is no integer solution.

    Therefore the possible factorization of \(2\) is trivial \(2 = \pm 2 \cdot \pm 1\).

    The remaining cases of \(3, 1+\sqrt{-5}, 1-\sqrt{-5}\) can be carried similar to the case of \(2\). Q.E.D.

  • Show \(2, 3, 1\pm \sqrt{-5}\) are not unit multiples of one another.

    Proof. Consider \(2\) and \(3\). Assume the contrary, say \(2 = u 3\) where \(u \in R\) is a unit. Then \(N(2) = N(u)N(3)\). But \(N(u) = 1\) we end up with \(4 = 9\). A contradiction.

    Similar arguments can be made among any pair of those four given elements in \(R\).

    Observation: By this problem,

    \begin{align*} 6 &= 2 \cdot 3 \\ &= (1 + \sqrt{-5})(1 - \sqrt{-5}), \end{align*}

    and every one of the factors is irreducible. \(6\) does not have a unique factorization in \(R\). Hence \(R\) is not a UFD.

Problem 2. Show that \(6\) and \(2+2\sqrt{-5}\) do not have a gcd in \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-5}]\).

Proof. Assume the contrary, a gcd \(r\) exists for \(6\) and \(2+2\sqrt{-5}\). Then

\begin{align*} 2 &\mid r, \\ 1+\sqrt{-5} &\mid r, \end{align*}

which further implies the norm \(N(r)\) is a multiple of \(4\) and \(6\). At the same time, \(N(r)\) divides \(N(6) = 36\) and \(N(2+2\sqrt{-5}) = 24\). \(N(r)\) is bounded above by \((24,36)=12\). \(N(r)=12\). Let \(r = a + b\sqrt{-5}\), \(a, b \in \ZZ\). The only possible \(r\)’s must satisfy \(a \leq 3\) and \(b \leq 1\). There are no integer solutions for \(a^2 + 5b^2 = 12\).

Thus the gcd does not exist. Q.E.D.

Problem 3. Let \(R\) be a PID, \(I\) an ideal of \(R\). Show that every ideal of quotient ring \(S= R/I\) is principal.

Proof. First we note that by correspondence theorem, there is a bijection between ideals containing a given ideal \(I\) in a ring \(R\) and ideals in the quotient ring \(R/I\) formed by ring \(R\) modulo this given ideal \(I\).

Let \(I_S\) be an ideal of quotient ring \(S\). Consider its preimage in \(R\), i.e., \(I_R = \{ r \in R : r+I \in I_S\}\). It is an ideal. Indeed,

  • \(I_S\) is non empty, \(I_S\) contains \(0 + I\), \(0 \in I_R\). Let \(a, b \in I_R\), then \(a + I \in I_S\) and \(b + I \in I_S\). So we have \(a - b + I = (a+I) - (b+I) \in I_S\), i.e., \(a - b \in I_S\).
  • If \(a \in I_R\) and \(r \in R\), then \(a + I \in I_S\) and \(ra + I = (r+I)(a+I) \in I_S\). So \(ra \in I_R\). Similar argument applies to \(ar\).

Hence we proved \(I_R\) is an ideal in \(R\).

Since \(R\) is a PID, \(I_R = (r_0)\) for some \(r_0 \in R\). We want to show \(I_S = (r_0+I)\) in \(S\).

  • By construction of \(I_R\), we see \((r_0+I)\subset I_S\).
  • If \(r + I \in I_S\) for some \(r \in R\), then \(r \in I_R \implies r = r_0 r_1\) for some \(r_1 \in R\).

    Therefore \(r+I = r_0r_1 +I = (r_0+I)(r_1+I)\). So \(r+I \in (r_0+I)\), i.e., \(I_S \subset (r_0+I)\).

Hence we proved the equality \(I_S = (r_0+I)\), i.e., every ideal in \(S\) is principal. Q.E.D.

Observation: Apply this problem to \(R = \ZZ\) and \(I = (6)\). The conclusion does not hold since \(\ZZ/6\ZZ\) fails to be an integral domain in the first place.

Problem 4: [Dummit & Foote 8.1 #10] Show that quotient ring \(\ZZ[i]/I\) is finite for any ideal \(I\) of \(\ZZ[i]\).

Proof. Consider any non zero ideal \(I\) in \(\ZZ[i]\). Note \(\ZZ[i]\) is a Euclidean domain, hence a PID. So we can write \(I = (\alpha)\) for some \(0 \neq \alpha \in \ZZ[i]\). Also in a Euclidean domain \(\ZZ[i]\) we can apply division algorithm, i.e., given \(\alpha \neq 0, r \in \ZZ[i]\), we can write

\[ r = q \alpha + r_0, \]

where \(r_0 = 0\) or if nonzero \(N(r_0) < N(\alpha)\) for some norm \(N(\cdot)\) and \(q \in \ZZ[i]\).

This means \(r - r_0 \in (\alpha)\), \(r, r_0\) belong to the same coset of \(I = (\alpha)\). This coset can be uniquely identified by equivalent class of \(r_0\) with \(N(r_0) < N(\alpha)\) for fixed \(\alpha \in \ZZ[i]\).

For a fixed \(\alpha\), its norm \(N(\alpha)\) is also fixed. By well ordering of integers bounded below by \(0\) above by \(N(\alpha)\), there are only finitely many \(N(r_0)\)’s. The number of cosets of \(I\) is finite, i.e., quotient ring \(\ZZ[i]/I\) is finite. Q.E.D.

Problem 5. [Dummit & Foote 8.2 #1] Show that given a PID, two ideals \((a), (b)\) in this PID are comaximal if and only if a gcd of \(a,b\) is \(1\). (\(a, b\) are coprime.)

Proof. (\(\Rightarrow\)) If \((a),(b)\) are comaximal, we want to show that \(\gcd (a,b) =1\). Indeed, $(a) + (b) = $ ring itself if they are comaximal. Denote this PID as \(R\). \((a) + (b) = R\) by comaximality. For any \(r \in R\), we can write \(r = r_1 + r_2\) for some \(r_1 \in (a)\) and \(r_2 \in (b)\).

In particular, \(1\) can be written \(1 = r_1 + r_2\) for some \(r_1, r_2\). Notice \(r_1\) is a multiple of \(a\) and similarly \(r_2\) is a multiple of \(b\). Therefore we have \(1 = ma + nb\) for some \(m, n \in R\), i.e., \(1\) is $R$-linear combination of \(a, b\). \(1\) is a gcd of \(a,b\).

(\(\Leftarrow\)) If \(\gcd (a,b) =1\), \(1 = ma+nb\) for some \(m, n \in R\). So \(1\) as a unit belongs to \((a)+(b)\). Ideal containing \(1\) is the ring itself, i.e., \((a)+(b)=R\). Q.E.D.

Problem 6. [Dummit & Foote 8.2 #5] Let \(R\) be quadratic integer ring \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-5}]\). Given ideals

\begin{align*} I_2 &= (2, 1 + \sqrt{-5}), \\ I_3 &= (3, 2 + \sqrt{-5}), \\ I_3^{'} &= (3, 1 - \sqrt{-5}). \end{align*}
  • Show \(I_2, I_3, I_3^{'}\) are not principal in \(R\).

    Proof. First consider the case of \(I_2\). Assume the contrary, suppose \(I_2\) is principal, then \((2, 1+\sqrt{-5}) = (r)\) for some \(r \in R\). Then we can write

    \begin{align*} 2 &= a r, \\ 1+\sqrt{-5} &= b r, \end{align*}

    where \(a, b \in R\). Take the norm on \(R\), \(N(a+b\sqrt{-5}) = a^2+5b^2\). Norm is multiplicative, we have

    \begin{align*} 4 = N(2) &= N(a)N(r), \\ 6 = N(1+\sqrt{-5}) &= N(b)N(r). \end{align*}

    \(N(r)\) is a common divisor of \(4\) and \(6\) so it can only be \(1\) or \(2\).

    • if \(N(r)=1\), then \(a_r^2+5b_r^2 = 1\). The only integer solutions are \(a_r = \pm 1\), \(b_r = 0\) and
    • if \(N(r)=2\), then there is no integer solution.

    We see \((2, 1+\sqrt{-5}) = (1) = R\).

    Choose \(1 \in R\) then \(1 = r_1 2 + r_2 (1+\sqrt{-5})\) for some \(r_1, r_2 \in R\). Multiply both side by \(1-\sqrt{-5}\) we get

    \[ 1-\sqrt{-5} = 2(1-\sqrt{-5})r_1 + 6r_2.\]

    Note the real part of the RHS of this equality is even. But the real part of LHS is odd. A contradiction. Q.E.D.

    Similar arguments can be carried out over \(I_3\) and \(I_3^{'}\).

  • Show that the product of two non principal ideals can be a principal ideal, e.g., example \(I_2^2 = (2)\).

    Proof. We can use the given example. First show the inclusion \(I_2^2 \subset (2)\).

    \[ I_2^2 = \{ \alpha \beta \mid \alpha, \beta \in I_2 \} .\]

    Let \(\alpha = 2 a + (1+\sqrt{-5}) b\), \(\alpha = 2 c + (1+\sqrt{-5}) d\) with \(a, b, c, d \in R\). Then we can compute

    \begin{align*} \alpha \beta &= \left(2 a + (1+\sqrt{-5}) b\right)\left(2 c + (1+\sqrt{-5}) d\right) \\ &= 2 \underbrace{\left((2ac+bc+ad+2bd) + (bc+bd+ad)\sqrt{-5}\right)}_{\in\, R} . \end{align*}

    So \(I_2^2 \subset (2)\). Next we show the other direction of the inclusion.

    \(2\in I_2\) obviously; for \(r = a+b\sqrt{-5} \in R\), note for \(I_2^2 = (2,2\sqrt{-5})\), \(2r \in I_2^2\). We proved \(I_2^2 = (2)\).

    Computer code to verify this.

    sage: R = ZZ[sqrt(-5)]
    sage: R
    Order in Number Field in a with defining polynomial x^2 + 5
    sage: I2 = R.ideal([2,1+sqrt(-5)])
    sage: I2
    Fractional ideal (2, a + 1)
    sage: 2 in I2
    True
    sage: I = I2^2
    sage: I
    Fractional ideal (2)
    sage: I.gens()
    (2, 2*a)
    sage: I2.gens()
    (2, a + 1)
    
  • Show that \(I_2I_3 (= 1 - \sqrt{-5})\) and \(I_2I_3^{'} (= 1 + \sqrt{-5})\) are principal and \((6) = I_2^2I_3I_3^{'}\).

    Proof. To show \(I_2I_3 (= 1 - \sqrt{-5})\), first to show the inclusion \(I_2I_3 \subset (1-\sqrt{-5})\). Indeed,

    \[ I_2 I_3 = \{\alpha \beta \mid \alpha \in I_2, \beta \in I_3 \}. \]

    Let \(\alpha = 2a + (1+\sqrt{-5})b\) and \(\beta = 3c + (2+\sqrt{-5})d\) with \(a, b, c, d \in R\). We Notice

    \begin{align*} 2\cdot 3 &= (1-\sqrt{-5})(1+\sqrt{-5}), \\ 2\cdot(2+\sqrt{-5}) &= (1-\sqrt{-5})(-1+\sqrt{-5}), \\ (1+\sqrt{-5})\cdot 3 &= (1-\sqrt{-5})(-2+\sqrt{-5}), \\ (1+\sqrt{-5})(2+\sqrt{-5}) &= (1-\sqrt{-5})(-3). \end{align*}

    So \(I_2I_3 \subset (1-\sqrt{-5})\). Next we show the inclusion \((1-\sqrt{-5}) \subset I_2I_3\). We Notice

    \[1- \sqrt{-5} = 2(2+\sqrt{-5}) -3(1+\sqrt{-5}). \]

    This implies the desired inclusion.

    Hence \(I_2I_3 = (1-\sqrt{-5})\).

    We can use similar arguments to show \(I_2I_3^{'} = (1+\sqrt{-5})\).

    Lastly, we have

    \begin{align*} I_2 I_3 \cdot I_2 I_3^{'} &= I_2^2 I_3 I_3^{'} \\ &= \left((1-\sqrt{-5})(1+\sqrt{-5})\right) \\ &= (6). \end{align*}

Problem 7. [Dummit & Foote 8.3 #6]

  • Show quotient ring \(\ZZ[i]/(1+i)\) is a field of order \(2\).

    Proof. By Problem 4 above, \(\ZZ[i]/(1+i)\) is finite since \((1+i)\) is a nonzero ideal in \(\ZZ[i]\). Note \(\ZZ[i]\) is also a UFD and \((1+i)\) is irreducible hence prime. Therefore \((1+i)\) is a prime ideal. Then quotient ring \(\ZZ[i]/(1+i)\) is an integral domain. At the same time it is finite, thus it is a (finite) field.

    To show that there are only two elements in this field, let \(a+bi \in \ZZ[i]\).

    • If \(a \equiv b \bmod 2\), then \(a+bi \in (1+i)\).

      Proof. In this case, \(\frac{a+b}2\) and \(\frac{a-b}2\) both are integers. We can write \(a+bi = (\frac{a+b}2 - \frac{a-b}2)(1+i)\), a multiple of \(1+i\).

    • If \(a \not \equiv b \bmod 2\), then \(a+bi \in (1+i) + 1\).

      Proof. \(a - 1 \equiv b \bmod 2\), applying previous claim we have \((a-1) +bi \in (1+i)\).

    Then \(a+bi\) belongs either to \((1+i)\) or \((1+i)+1\), i.e., quotient ring \(\ZZ[i]/(1+i)\) has only two cosets. Q.E.D.

  • Show quotient ring \(\ZZ[i]/(q)\) is a field of order \(q^2\), where \(q\in \ZZ\) such that \(q \equiv 3 \bmod 4\).

    Proof. The \(q\) such that \(q \equiv 3 \bmod 4\) is irreducible in \(\ZZ[i]\). Similar to previous problem \((q)\) is prime in UFD \(\ZZ[i]\). Thus \(\ZZ[i]/(q)\) is an integral domain. Further it is finite since \((q)\) is nonzero. \(\ZZ[i]/(q)\) is therefore a finite field. It remains to show its order is \(q^2\).

    \(\ZZ[i]/(q)\) is nothing but the set of equivalent classes modulo \(q\), i.e.,

    \begin{align*} \ZZ[i]/(q) &= \{ [a+bi]_q \mid a, b, q \in \ZZ\} \\ &= \{ a+bi \mid 0 \leq a, b \leq q -1, a, b, q \in \ZZ\}. \end{align*}

    It is easy to see the cardinality of this quotient group is \(q\times q\), i.e., it has \(q^2\) distinct cosets. Q.E.D.

  • Let \(p\in \ZZ\) be a prime with \(p\equiv 1 \bmod 4\) and let \(p = \pi \bar{\pi}\) as in Proposition 18, \(\pi = a+bi, \bar{\pi} = a-bi\) irreducibles.
    • Show hypotheses for Chinese remainder theorem are satisfied and use this to show

      \[ \ZZ[i]/(p) \simeq \ZZ[i]/(\pi) \times \ZZ[i]/(\bar{\pi}) \]

      as rings.

      Proof. Similar to previous problem, we argue the cardinality of

      \[ \ZZ[i]/(p) = \{ a+bi \mid 0 \leq a, b, \leq p-1\} \]

      is \(p^2\).

      Since \(p\equiv 1 \bmod 4\), by Proposition 18, \(\pi, \bar{\pi}\) are irreducibles in UFD \(\ZZ[i]\) hence \((\pi), (\bar{\pi})\) are prime ideals. Further we conclude \(\ZZ[i]/(\pi), \ZZ[i]/(\bar{\pi})\) are integral domains and even further finite fields.

      Note \((\pi) + (\bar{\pi}) = \ZZ[i]\) hence \((\pi), (\bar{\pi})\) are coprime.

      \begin{align*} (\pi)(\bar{\pi}) &= (\pi \bar{\pi}) \\ &= (p). \end{align*}

      Hence the hypotheses of Chinese remainder theorem are satisfied.

    • Show \(\ZZ[i]/(p)\) has order \(p^2\) and \(\ZZ[i]/(\pi),\ZZ[i]/(\bar{\pi})\) have order \(p\).

      Proof. Similar to previous problem, we argue \(\ZZ[i]/(p)\) is of order \(p^2\). Further note that \((\pi), (\bar{\pi})\) are not \((p)\) itself, i.e., each has an order other than \(p^2\). It must follow that

      \[ |\ZZ[i]/(\pi)| = |\ZZ[i]/(\bar{\pi})| = p.\]

Problem 8. [Dummit & Foote 8.3 #8 (b,c)]

  • (b) Given \(I_2 = (2, 1+\sqrt{-5}), I_3 = (3, 2+\sqrt{-5}), I_3^{'} = (3, 2-\sqrt{-5})\) in \(R = \ZZ[\sqrt{-5}]\). Show \(I_2, I_3, I_3^{'}\) are prime ideals in \(R\).

    Proof. First consider the case of \(I_2\). We want to show that \(R/I_2\) is an integral domain. \(R/(2) = \{ a+b\sqrt{-5} \mid 0 \leq a, b \leq 1 \}\) has \(4\) elements; \(I_2/(2) \simeq \ZZ/2\ZZ\) has \(2\) elements. By the Third Isomorphism Theorem

    \[ R/I_2 \simeq (R/(2))/(I_2/(2)). \]

    Therefore \(R/I_2\) has \(2\) elements. It is easy to check \(1\) and \(0\) are contained in \(R/I_2\) and they are the only two elements. \(R/I_2\) is thus an integral domain as desired.

    Next consider the case of \(R/I_3\). We note \(3\) is square free, for \(R/(3)\),

    \[\{ a+b\sqrt{-5} \mid 0 \leq a, b \leq 2 \} \]

    is a set of cosets representatives. \(R/(3)\) has \(3 \times 3 = 9\) elements.

    For \(I_3/(3)\), every element in it is equivalent to one of

    \[ 0, 2 + \sqrt{-5}, 1+2\sqrt{-5}, \]

    i.e., \(I_3/(3)\) has three elements.

    By the Third Isomorphism Theorem,

    \[ R/I_3 \simeq \ZZ/3\ZZ \]

    as a ring. It is also a field, so \(I_3\) is maximal hence prime.

    The case of \(R/I_3^{'}\) is similar to \(R/I_3\). Q.E.D.

  • (c) Show the factorizations of \(6 = 2\cdot 3 = (1+\sqrt{-5})(1-\sqrt{-5})\) imply ideal factorizations \((6) = (2)\cdot (3) = (1+\sqrt{-5})(1-\sqrt{-5})\).

    Proof. For factorization \(6 = 2\cdot 3\) , apply the product of principal ideals to it we get \((6) = (2)(3)\). Similarly we argue \((6) = (1+\sqrt{-5})(1-\sqrt{-5})\).

    By inspection,

    \begin{align*} I_2^2 &= (2), \\ I_3 I_3^{'} &= (3), \\ I_2 I_3^{'} &= (1+\sqrt{-5}), \\ I_2 I_3 &= (1-\sqrt{-5}). \end{align*}

    So indeed they give the same factorizations of principal ideal \((6)\). Q.E.D.

Problem 9. [Dummit & Foote 9.1 #7] Let \(R\) be a commutative ring with \(1\). Show that a polynomial ring in more than one variable over \(R\) is not a PID.

Proof. Assume the contrary, suppose \(R[x_1, \ldots, x_n] = R[x_1, \ldots, x_{n-1}][x_n]\) is a PID, then \(R[x_1, \ldots, x_{n-1}]\) is a field by Corollary 8.2. (If \(R\) is a commutative ring such that \(R[x]\) is a PID or Euclidean domain, then \(R\) is a field.) A contradiction. Q.E.D.

Problem 10. [Dummit & Foote 9.2 #5] Find all the ideals in the ring \(F[x]/(p(x))\), where \(F\) is a field and \(p(x)\) is a polynomial in \(F[x]\).

Proof. By Theorem 3 in Chapter 9, \(F\) is field then \(F[x]\) is a Euclidean domain. Then \(F[x]\) is a PID. Hence all ideals of \(F[x]\) can be written as \(I = (f(x))\) for some polynomial \(f \in F[x]\).

By the Fourth Isomorphism Theorem of ring, (Let \(I\) be an ideal of \(R\), \(A\) a subring containing \(I\). \(A\) is an ideal in \(R\) if and only if \(A/I\) is an ideal in \(R/I\).) take \(R = F[x]\) and \(I = (p(x))\). We want to find ideals in \(F[x]\) that contain \(p(x)\). But all ideals in \(F[x]\) are principal, i.e., the inclusion

\[ (f(x)) \supset (p(x)) \]

for some \(f(x) \in F[x]\) implies \(f(x)\mid p(x)\).

On the other hand, \(F[x]\) is a PID means it is a UFD. \(p(x)\) factors into irreducibles

\[ p(x) = p_1^{e_1}(x) \cdots p_k^{e_k}(x). \]

Then ideals in \(F(x)/(p(x))\) are the ones of the form

\[ (p_1^{f_1}(x) \cdots p_k^{f_k}(x))/(p(x)), \]

where \(0\leq f_i \leq e_i\) for \(1 \leq i \leq k\).

Problem 11. [Dummit & Foote 9.3 #2] Show that if \(f(x), g(x)\) are polynomials with rational coefficients whose product \(fg\) has integer coefficients, then the product of any coefficient of \(g\) and any coefficient of \(f\) is an integer.

Proof. Based on the description above, we have \(f(x) g(x)\in \ZZ[x]\) with \(f(x), g(x)\in \QQ[x]\). By Gauss’s lemma, there are \(r,s \in \QQ\) such that

\begin{align*} rf &\in \ZZ[x], \\ sg &\in \ZZ[x] \end{align*}

and \(fg = (rf)(sg)\) each of which is in \(\ZZ[x]\).

Since \(\ZZ[x]\) is an integral domain, cancellation law holds; we can cancel \(fg\) on both sides. We end up with \(rs = 1\).

For any coefficient of \(f\), say \(f_i\), \(rf \in \ZZ[x]\) implies \(r f_i \in \ZZ\). Similarly \(sg \in \ZZ[x]\) implies \(s g_j \in \ZZ\) for any coefficient of \(g\).

Then

\begin{align*} f_i g_j &= (rs) f_i g_j \\ &= (r f_i)(s g_j) \\ &= {\rm integer} \times {\rm integer}. \end{align*}

Hence the claim is proved. Q.E.D.

Problem 12. [Dummit & Foote 9.3 #4] Given \(R = \ZZ + x \QQ[x]\).

  • Show \(R\) is an integral domain and units are \(\pm 1\).

    Proof. First we note that \(\QQ[x]\) is an integral domain and we can view \(R\) as a subring of integral domain \(\QQ[x]\). So \(R\) must be an integral domain.

    Next, we want to show the units are \(\pm 1\).

    Let \(f, g \in R\). If \(f(x) g(x) = 1\), which is a $0$-th degree polynomial, we must have \(f\) and \(g\) are both $0$-th degree polynomials and they are either constant polynomials \(+1\) or \(-1\) at the same time. Then \(\pm 1\) are the only units in \(R\). Q.E.D.

  • Show in \(R\) the irreducibles are \(\pm p\), where \(p\) is a prime in \(\ZZ\). The irreducible polynomials \(f(x)\) in \(\QQ[x]\) have constant term \(\pm 1\). These irreducibles are prime in \(R\).

    Proof. First, we need to find all the irreducibles in \(R\). We only have to focus on $0$-th degree polynomials, i.e., in this case integers since any polynomial in \(R\) of degree greater than \(0\) can always be written as some integer (\(\neq 1\)) times \(1 + q_1 x + \cdots\); and this factorization is non trivial.

    By previous problem if the integer of interest is composite, it has non trivial factorization and if prime the factorization is trivial. Hence the first claim.

    Secondly, we want to show irreducibles in \(\QQ[x]\) have constant term \(1\). Assume \(f(x) = a(x)b(x)\), in this factorization, either \(a(x)\) or \(b(x)\) is a unit in \(\QQ[x]\), i.e., one of them is of degree \(0\). Without loss of generality, say \(a(x) \in \QQ\). Similar to the previous argument, if the constant term of \(f\) is not \(\pm 1\), then \(f\) can always be written as some rational (\(\neq 1\)) times \(1 + q_1 x + \cdots\). Therefore irreducibles in \(\QQ[x]\) have constant term \(\pm 1\).

    If \(f(x)\) is irreducible in \(R\),

    • if \(\deg (f) = 0\), then \(f\) is irreducible in integers, \(f(x) = \pm p\), where \(p \in \ZZ\) is a prime.
    • if \(\deg (f) \geq 1\), then its constant term must be \(\pm 1\). Otherwise \(f(x)=p \frac{f(x)}p\) is a non trivial factorization when \(f(x)\neq \pm p\).

      Assume \(f(x) = g(x)h(x)\) for some non units \(g, h \in \QQ[x]\). Then the constant term of \(g\) is some \(\frac{m}n\) and correspondingly the constant term of \(h\) is \(\frac{n}m\). Therefore by Gauss’s lemma,

      \begin{align*} g(x) &= \frac{m}n g^\prime (x), \\ h(x) &= \frac{n}m h^\prime (x) \end{align*}

      for some \(g^\prime, h^\prime \in R\). So now \(f(x) = g^\prime h^\prime\) is a factorization in \(R\),

      \begin{align*} 0 < \deg (g) = \deg (g^\prime), \\ 0 < \deg (h) = \deg (h^\prime). \end{align*}

      Hence \(g^\prime (x), h^\prime (x)\) are non units in \(R\).

    Lastly, if \(p\in \ZZ\) is prime, then \((p) \subset R\) is the kernel of map

    \begin{align*} \varphi : R &\to \ZZ/p\ZZ \\ q_n x^n + \cdots + q_1 x + z &\mapsto p\ZZ + [z]_p. \end{align*}

    If \(q \in \QQ[x]\) is irreducible with constant term \(\rm 1\), since \(R/(q)\) is contained in the integral domain \(\QQ/(q)\), \(R/(q)\) is an integral domain, i.e., \(q\) is prime. Q.E.D.

  • Show \(x\) cannot be written as the product of irreducibles in \(R\) (\(x\) is not irreducible) and conclude \(R\) is not a UFD.

    Proof. For any \(vx \in R\) with \(v \in \QQ\), is not irreducible. Consider \(vx = \left(\frac{1}2 x\right) \cdot 2\).

    If \(x = \pi_1 \cdots \pi_n\) with each \(\pi_i\) irreducible, then

    \begin{align*} 1 &= N(\pi_1) + \cdots N(\pi_n) \\ &= \deg(\pi_1) + \cdots \deg(\pi_n). \end{align*}

    Therefore only one of the \(\pi_i\)’s has the form \(\pi_i = qx + z\). Others are just integers. But with nonzero \(z\) and nonzero \(\pi_i\)’s in \(\ZZ\), their product cannot be some polynomial with zero constant term \(x+0\). Hence \(x\) is not a product of irreducibles in \(R\).

    In a UFD, every element factors into irreducibles (and this factorization is unique). Thus \(R\) is not a UFD. Q.E.D.

  • Show \(x\) is not prime in \(R\) and describe quotient ring \(R/(x)\).

    Proof. First we note \(\frac{1}2 \cdot x = x\), both factors lying in \(R\). Further \(2\) is not divisible by \(x\).

    If \(\frac{1}2 x \in (x)\) then \(\frac{1}2 x = ax\). In the integral domain \(R\) we have \(a = \frac{1}2 \in R\). A contradiction.

    So \(x\) does not divide any of the two factors in the product. Hence \(x\) is not prime in \(R\).

    Second, we want to show \(R/(x)\) is not an integral domain and

    \[R/(x) =\{a+bx+(x) \mid a \in \ZZ, b \in \QQ, 0\leq b < 1 \}.\]

    Indeed, for the \((\supset)\) direction, it is obvious by the construction of the set on the right hand side.

    For the \((\subset)\) direction, given \(a(x) \in R\),

    \begin{align*} a(x) &= q_n x^n + \cdots + q_1 x + z \\ &= (q_n x^n + \cdots + q_2 x)x + (w+ q_1^\prime)x + z \\ &= (q_n x^n + \cdots +q_2 x + w)x + q_1^\prime x + z, \end{align*}

    where \(0\leq q_1^\prime < 1\), \(w\in \ZZ\).

    Combining both directions, we have

    \[ R/(x) \simeq \ZZ + (\QQ/\ZZ)x. \]

Problem 13. [Dummit & Foote 9.4 #1] Determine the irreducibility of

  • (a) \(x^2 + x + 1\) in \(\FF_2[x]\).

    Solution. We note that \(0 + 0 + 1 \neq 0\) and \(1 + 1 + 1 \neq 0\), hence \(x^2 +x +1\) has not solutions in \(\FF_2\). So it is irreducible.

  • (b) \(x^3 +x +1\) in \(\FF_3[x]\).

    Solution. We note the factorization \(x^3 +x +1 = (x+2)(x^2+x+2)\) in \(\FF_3\). So it is reducible.

  • (c) \(x^4+1\) in \(\FF_5[x]\).

    Solution. We note the factorization \(x^4+1 = (x^2+2)(x^2+3)\) in \(\FF_5\). So it is reducible.

  • (d) \(x^4 +10 x^2 + 1\) in \(\ZZ[x]\).

    Solution. Assume it has a linear factor. The only possible integer solutions of this polynomial are \(\pm 1\) but neither is a actual solution.

    Now assume it can factor into two quadratic terms \(x^4+10x^2+1 = (x^2+ax+b)(x^2+cx+d)\). Multiply out,

    \begin{align*} x^4 + (a+c)x^3 +(ac+b+d)x^2 + (ad+bc)x + bd = x^4 +1. \end{align*}

    Matching the coefficients we get

    \begin{align*} \left\{ \begin{array}{rcl} a+c &=& 0 \\ ac+b+d &=&10 \\ ad+bc &=&0 \\ bd &=& 1. \end{array}\right. \implies \left\{ \begin{array}{rcl} b &=& \pm 1 \\ d &=& \pm 1. \\ \end{array} \right. \end{align*}

    On the other hand, from the second equation, \(ac = 8\) or \(12\). But \(a = -c\), we get \(-a^2 = 8\) or \(12\). A contradiction.

    Therefore \(x^4+10^2 + 1\) is irreducible in \(\ZZ[x]\).

Problem 14. Let \(p(x) = x^4 - 4x^2 +8x +2\). Show it is irreducible over quadratic field \(F=\QQ(\sqrt{-2}) = \{a + b \sqrt{-2} \mid a, b \in \QQ\}\).

Proof. Note \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\) is an integral domain; its field of fraction is \(\QQ(\sqrt{-2})\). It suffices to show \(p(x)\) is irreducible over \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\).

First assume \(p(x)\) has a linear factor \(x - r\). Then \(r \mid 2\) in \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\). Use the norm \(N(r) = N(a+b\sqrt{-2}) = a^2 + 2b^2\), \(N(r) \mid 4\). Solving \(a^2 + 2b^2 = 1, 2, 4\) we get \(a = \pm 1, \pm 2, \pm \sqrt{-2}\). Note none of them is a solution of \(p(x) = 0\). Hence \(p(x)\) has no linear factors.

Next, assume \(p(x)\) factors into two quadratic terms, say one of them is \(x^2 +ax +b\). By long division,

\begin{align*} p(x) &= (x^2 +ax +b)(x^2 - ax + (a^2 - b -4)) + \\ &\hspace{10mm} (8- a^3 +2ab +4a)x + \\ &\hspace{10mm} (2 - a^2b +b^2 +4b). \end{align*}

Then we must have

\begin{align*} \left\{ \begin{array}{rl} 8 - a^3 + 2ab +4a &=0, \\ 2 - a^2b +b^2 +4b &=0. \end{array} \right. \end{align*}

From the second equation, rewriting it as \(2 + (4 - a^2)b + b^2 = 0\). We see \(b = \pm 1, \pm 2, \pm \sqrt{-2} \in \ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\).

  • If \(b = 1\), \(2 - a^2 +5 = 0\). There are no solutions in \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\).
  • If \(b = -1\), \(2 +a^2 +2 = 0\). There are no solutions in \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\).
  • If \(b = 2\), \(2 - 2a^2 +12 =0\). There are no solutions in \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\).
  • If \(b = -2\), \(2 + 2a^2 +12 =0\). There are no solutions in \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-2}]\).
  • If \(b = \sqrt{-2}\), we get \(a = \pm 2\). But the resulting \(a, b\) do not satisfy the first equation \(8 - a^3 + 2ab +4a =0\).
  • If \(b = \sqrt{-2}\), we get \(a = \pm 2\). But the resulting \(a, b\) do not satisfy the first equation \(8 - a^3 + 2ab +4a =0\).

So \(p(x)\) does not have quadratic factors either. Hence \(p(x)\) is irreducible over \(\QQ(\sqrt{-2})\).

To verify, use magma code

  P<x> := PolynomialRing(QuadraticField(-2));
  f := x^4-4*x^2+8*x+2; 
  Factorization(f); 
[
    <x^4 - 4*x^2 + 8*x + 2, 1>
]
  IsIrreducible(f);
true

Problem 15. [Dummit & Foote 13.1 #1] Show \(p(x) = x^3 +9x +6\) is irreducible in \(\QQ[x]\). Let \(\theta\) be a root of \(p(x)\), find the inverse of \(1+\theta\) in \(\QQ(\theta)\).

Solution. First we work with prime \(p = 3\) in \(\ZZ[x]\). By Eisenstein, \(3 \mid 9\), \(3 \mid 6\) but \(3^2 \not \mid 6\). So \(p(x)\) is irreducible in \(\ZZ[x]\). Then it is irreducible in \(\QQ[x]\) by Gauss’s lemma.

Next, we use long division,

\[ x^3 + 9x + 6 = (1+x)(x^2 - x +10) -4 .\]

Set \(x = \theta\), we have

\[ (1+\theta)(\theta^2 - \theta +10) = 4.\]

Therefore in \(\QQ(\theta)\),

\[ (1+\theta)^{-1} = \frac{1}4 (\theta^2 - \theta + 10). \]

Problem 16. [Dummit & Foote 13.1 #2] Show that \(x^3 - 2x - 2\) is irreducible over \(\QQ\). And let \(\theta\) be a root, compute \((1+\theta)(1+\theta+\theta^2)\) and \(\frac{1+\theta}{1+\theta+\theta^2}\) in \(\QQ(\theta)\).

Solution. Apply Eisenstein with \(p = 2\) in \(\ZZ[x]\). \(2 \mid -2\) and \(2^2 \not \mid -2\). So \(x^3 -2x - 2\) is irreducible in \(\ZZ[x]\). Further by Gauss’s lemma, it is irreducible over \(\QQ\). Q.E.D.

Next substitute the root \(\theta\),

\[ \theta^3 - 2\theta - 2 = 0. \]

Then

\begin{align*} (1+\theta)(1+\theta+\theta^2) &= \theta^3 + 2\theta^2 + 2\theta + 1 \\ &= (2\theta +2) + 2\theta^2 + 2\theta + 1 \\ &= 2\theta^2 + 4\theta + 3. \end{align*}

Last we want to compute the last part of the problem. By long division

\[ x^3 - 2x - 2 = (x^2 + x + 1)(x-1) - (2x+1). \]

Set \(x = \theta\),

\begin{align*} \theta^3 - 2\theta - 2 & = 0 \\ \implies (\theta^2 + \theta + 1)(\theta - 1) &= 2\theta +1. \end{align*}

Using long division, we also have

\begin{align*} x^3 - 2x - 2 = (2x + 1)(\frac{x^2}2 - \frac{x}4 - \frac{7}8) - \frac{9}8. \end{align*}

Substituting \(x = \theta\),

\begin{align*} (2\theta + 1)(\frac{\theta^2}2 - \frac{\theta}4 - \frac{7}8) &= \frac{9}8 \\ \end{align*}

Then

\begin{align*} (\theta^2 + \theta +1 )(\theta - 1)(2\theta+1)^{-1} &= 1 \\ \implies (\theta^2 + \theta +1 )(\theta - 1) (\frac{\theta^2}2 - \frac{\theta}4 - \frac{7}8) \frac{8}9 &= 1 \\ \implies (\theta^2 + \theta +1 )^{-1} &= (\theta - 1)(\frac{\theta^2}2 - \frac{\theta}4 - \frac{7}8) \frac{8}9 \\ &= \frac{1}3(-2\theta^2 +\theta +5). \end{align*}

Therefore,

\begin{align*} \frac{1+\theta}{1+\theta+\theta^2} &= (1+\theta)\frac{1}3(-2\theta^2 +\theta +5) \\ &= \frac{1}3(-\theta^2 + 2\theta +1). \end{align*}

Problem 17. [Dummit & Foote 13.1 #3] Show \(x^3 + x+1\) is irreducible over \(\FF_2\). Let \(\theta\) be a root, compute the powers of \(\theta\) in \(\FF_2(\theta)\).

Solution. First we note \(x^3 +x +1\) has no root in \(\FF_2\), i.e.,

\begin{align*} 0 + 0 + 1 &\neq 0, \\ 1 + 1 + 1 &\neq 0. \end{align*}

Therefore \(x^3 +x +1\) is irreducible in \(\FF_2\). Q.E.D.

Since \(\theta\) is a root, we have \(\theta^3 + \theta + 1 = 0\). We already have powers \(1, \theta, \theta^2\) as different polynomials in \(\FF_2(\theta)\). Continue to compute higher powers,

\begin{align*} \theta^3 &= - \theta -1 \\ &= \theta + 1. \\ \theta^4 &= \theta^3 \cdot \theta \\ &= \theta^2 + \theta. \\ \theta^5 &= \theta^3 + \theta^2 \\ &= \theta^2 + \theta + 1. \\ \theta^6 &= \theta^3 + \theta^2 + \theta \\ &= \theta^2 + 1. \\ \theta^7 &= \theta^3 + \theta \\ &= \theta + 1 + \theta \\ &= -\theta +1 + \theta \\ &=1. \end{align*}

We have looped back to \(1\), so all different powers are \(1, \theta, \theta^2, \theta+1, \theta^2+\theta, \theta^2 + \theta + 1, \theta^2 + 1\).

Problem 18. [Dummit & Foote 13.1 #6] Show that if \(\alpha\) is a root of

\[ a_n x^n + \cdots + a_1 x_1 + a_0, \]

then \(a_n \alpha\) is a root of monic polynomial

\[ x^n + a_{n-1}x^{n-1} + a_n a_{n-2} x^{n-2} + \cdots + a_n^{n-2}a_1 x + a_n^{n-1}a_0. \]

Proof. Substitute \(\alpha\) in to

\[ a_n x^n + \cdots + a_1 x_1 + a_0 = 0, \]

we get

\[ a_n \alpha^n + \cdots + a_1 \alpha + a_0 = 0. \]

Multiply both sides by \(a_n^{n-1}\),

\begin{align*} (a_n \alpha)^n + a_{n-1} (a_n \alpha)^{n-1} + a_n a_{n-2}(a_n^{n-2} \alpha^{n-2}) + \cdots + a_n^{n-2} a_1 (a_n \alpha) + a_n^{n-1} a_0 = 0, \end{align*}

which implies \(a_n \alpha\) is a root of

\[ x^n + a_{n-1}x^{n-1} + a_n a_{n-2} x^{n-2} + \cdots + a_n^{n-2}a_1 x + a_n^{n-1}a_0. \]

Problem 19. [Dummit & Foote 13.1 #7] Show \(x^3 - nx +2\) is irreducible for \(n \neq -1, 3, 5\).

Proof. We note the polynomial is a cubic, if it is reducible, then it has a linear factor. Say this root is \(r \in \ZZ\). \(r\) must divide the constant term \(2\). Such possible \(r\)’s are \(\pm 1\), \(\pm 2\).

We can compute all corresponding \(n\)’s by looping over possible \(r\)’s. We get

\begin{align*} \begin{array}{rll} &r= 1, &n = 3;\\ &r= -1,&n = -1;\\ &r= 2, &n = 5;\\ &r= -2,&n = 3. \end{array} \end{align*}

If \(n\) falls outside \(\{-1, 3, 5\}\) then \(r\) fails to be a root of the polynomial. Therefore \(x^3-nx+2\) is irreducible if \(n \neq -1, 3, 5\). Q.E.D.

Problem 20. [Dummit & Foote 13.2 #1] Let \(\FF\) be a finite field of characteristic \(p\). Show \(|\FF| = p^n\) for some positive \(n\).

Proof. \(\FF_p = \ZZ/p\ZZ\) is in \(\FF\) as a subfield. Consider \(\FF\) as a vector space over field \(\FF_p\). Let \(v_1, \ldots, v_n\) be the basis in \(\FF\). Then for any \(f \in \FF\), it can be written as linear combination of \(v_i\)’s,

\[ f = c_1 v_1 + \cdots + c_n v_n, \]

where \(c_1, \ldots, c_n \in \FF_p\).

So \(|\FF| = \#f \in \FF\), looping over all combinations of \(c_i\)’s, that is

\[ \underbrace{p\cdot \,\cdots \, \cdot p}_{n\, \rm{copies}} = p^n. \]

Problem 21. [Dummit & Foote 13.2 #3] Determine the minimal polynomial over \(\QQ\) for \(1+i\).

Solution. Consider the conjugate of \(1+i\), that is \(1-i\). Then the polynomial

\[ (x - (1+i))(x - (1-i)) = x^2 - 2x + 2.\]

is the minimal polynomial of \(1+i\). Indeed, this polynomial is irreducible. To see this, check all possible rational solutions, i.e., \(\pm 1, \pm 2\). But none of them solves the equation \(x^2 - 2x + 2= 0\). Q.E.D.

Problem 22. [Dummit & Foote 13.2 #5] Let \(F= \QQ(i)\). Show \(x^3-2\) and \(x^3 - 3\) are irreducible over \(F\).

Proof. First consider the case of \(x^3 - 2\). Notice it is a cubic, if it is reducible, then it has a linear factor. The roots of \(x^3 - 2\) are \(\sqrt[3]{2}\zeta, \sqrt[3]{2}\zeta^2, \sqrt[3]{2}\), where \(\zeta\) is the cubic root of unity,

\begin{align*} \zeta &= e^{\frac{2\pi i}3} \\ &= \frac{1}2 + i \frac{\sqrt{3}}2. \end{align*}

It is easy to see that none of the roots of \(x^3 -2\) belongs to \(\QQ(i) = \{a+bi : a, b \in \QQ \}\). Therefore \(x^3 -2\) is irreducible in \(\QQ(i)\).

We can apply similar argument to \(x^3 - 3\). Q.E.D.

Problem 23. [Dummit & Foote 13.2 #8] Let \(F\) be a field of characteristic \(\neq 2\). Let \(D_1\) and \(D_2\) be elements of \(F\) such that neither \(D_1\) or \(D_2\) is a square. Show \(F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2})\) is of degree \(4\) over \(F\) if \(D_1\) and \(D_2\) are not square in \(F\), or of degree \(2\) otherwise.

Proof. First we claim if neither \(D_1\) or \(D_2\) is a square in \(F\), then \(D_1 D_2\) is a square if and only if \(\sqrt{D_2} \in F(\sqrt{D_1})\).

Proof of the Claim. (\(\Rightarrow\)) If \(D_1 D_2\) is a square in \(F\), \(D_1 D_2 = d^2\) for some \(d \in F\). Then \(\sqrt{D_1} = \pm \frac{d}{\sqrt{D_1}} = \pm \left( \frac{d}{D_1}\right) \sqrt{D_1} \in F(\sqrt{D_1})\).

(\(\Leftarrow\)) If \(\sqrt{D_2} \in F(\sqrt{D_1})\), \(D_1\) is not a square, then \(F(\sqrt{D_1})\) has degree \(2\) over \(F\). We can write

\[ F(\sqrt{D_1}) = \{ a+b \sqrt{D_1} : a, b \in F\}. \]

Let \(\sqrt{D_2} = a + b\sqrt{D_1}\) for some \(a, b \in F\). Then \(D_2 = (a^2 + b^2 D_1) + (2ab)\sqrt{D_1}\). Therefore \(2ab = 0\). By our hypothesis that the characteristic of \(F\) is not \(2\), we get either \(a\) or \(b\) is \(0\).

  • if \(b = 0\), then \(D_2 = a^2\), a contradiction. \(D_2\) is not a square.
  • if \(a = 0\), then \(D_2 = D_1 b^2\), \(D_1 D_2 = (b D_1)^2\) is a square in \(F\).

This completes the proof of the claim.

Continue the proof of the problem, note \([F(\sqrt{D_1}) : F ] = 2\) since \(x^2 - D_1\) is irreducible in \(F\). By tower argument,

\[ [F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2}) :F ] = [F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2}): F(\sqrt{D_1})] [F(\sqrt{D_1} : F)].\]

By the claim we just proved,

  • if \(\sqrt{D_2} \in F(\sqrt{D_1})\) then \([F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2}): F(\sqrt{D_1})] = 1\), i.e., if \(D_1 D_2\) is a square in \(F\), \([F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2}) :F ] = 1 \cdot 2 = 2\).
  • if \(D_1 D_2\) however is not a square in \(F\), \(\sqrt{D_2}\not \in F(\sqrt{D_1})\), then \([F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2}): F(\sqrt{D_1})] = 2\). Therefore \([F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2}) :F ] = 2 \cdot 2 = 4\).

This completes the proof. Q.E.D.

Problem 24. [Dummit & Foote 13.2 #12] Suppose the degree of extension \(K/F\) is prime \(p\). Show any subfield \(E\) of \(K\) containing \(F\) is either \(K\) or \(F\).

Proof. By tower formula of field extensions,

\[ p = [K : F] = [K : E] [E : F]. \]

Since \(p\) is prime, it has only factors \(1\) and itself. Therefore either \([K : E] = 1\) or \([E : F] = 1\), i.e., \(E\) is either \(K\) or \(F\). Q.E.D.

Problem 25. [Dummit & Foote 13.2 #14] Show that if \([F(\alpha) : F]\) is odd, then \(F(\alpha) = F(\alpha^2)\).

Proof. One direction is obvious, \(F(\alpha^2) \subset F(\alpha)\) since \(\alpha^2 = \alpha \cdot \alpha\).

To see the other direction, by tower argument

\[ [F(\alpha) : F] = [F(\alpha) : F(\alpha^2)] [F(\alpha^2) : F], \]

the left hand side is odd by hypothesis and on the right hand side \([F(\alpha) : F(\alpha^2)]\) is \(1\) or \(2\) (since \(\alpha\) solves \(x^2 - \alpha^2 = 0\) in \(F(\alpha^2)\).) therefore \([F(\alpha) : F(\alpha^2)]\) must be \(1\). So we have the equality in the problem. Q.E.D.

Problem 25. [Dummit and Foote 13.2 #17] Let \(f(x)\) be an irreducible polynomial of degree \(n\) over a field \(F\). Let \(g(x)\) be any polynomial in \(F[x]\). Show any irreducible factor of \(f(g(x))\) has degree divisible by \(n\).

Proof. \(f(g(x))\) factors into product of irreducibles, say one of the factors is \(h(x)\) and its degree is \(\deg (h(x)) = n_0\). Let \(\alpha\) be a root of \(h(x)\). \(h(\alpha) = 0\) implies \(f(g(\alpha)) = 0\). We see \(g(\alpha)\) is a root of \(f(x)\). But \(f\) itself is irreducible by hypothesis and

\[ F(g(\alpha)) : F] = n. \]

By tower argument,

\[ [F(\alpha) : F(g(\alpha))] \underbrace{[ F(g(\alpha)) : F]}_n = \underbrace{[F(\alpha) : F]}_{n_0}. \]

We see \(n \mid n_0\) as desired. Q.E.D.

Problem 26. Let \(K/F\) be an algebraic extension. Suppose \(R\) is a subring contained in \(K\) which contains \(F\). Show \(R\) is a subfield of \(K\).

Proof. We need to show \(R\) is indeed a field.

For any nonzero \(r \in R\), we have \(r\) is algebraic over \(F\). There exists an irreducible polynomial

\[ f(x) = x^n + a_{n-1} x^{n-1} + \cdots + a_0 \in F[x] \]

for which \(f(r) = 0\).

From

\[ r^n + a_{n-1} r^{n-1} + \cdots + a_1 r + a_0 = 0 \]

we get

\begin{align*} a_0 r^{-1} &= -(a_1 + a_2 r + \cdots + r^{n-1}) \\ \implies r^{-1} &= -a_0^{-1}(a_1 + a_2 r + \cdots + r^{n-1}), \end{align*}

which makes sense since \(a_0 = 0\) by irreducibility of \(f \in F[x]\).

Also \(a_i\)’s are elements of \(F\) hence elements of \(R\). Therefore \(r\) is invertible in \(R\). Nonzero elements in ring \(R\) invertible implies \(R\) is a field. Q.E.D.

Problem 27. Show it is impossible to construct regular $9$-gon using straightedge and compass only.

Proof. Assume the contrary, suppose regular $9$-gon is constructible. Then we obtain angles of \(40^\circ\). By bisecting an angle of \(40^\circ\), we can obtain angles of \(40^\circ\). By remark of Theorem 24 in Dummit and Foote 13.3, we know \(\cos 20^\circ\) and \(\sin 20^\circ\) cannot be constructed. A contradiction. Hence regular $9$-gon is not constructible. Q.E.D.

Problem 28. Show that \(\alpha = \cos \frac{2\pi}5\) is a constructible number. Deduce $5$-gon is constructible using straightedge and compass.

Proof. First consider the polynomial \(f(x) = x^2 - x + 1\) and \(\alpha^{'} = 2\alpha\). We notice \(f(\alpha^{'}) = 0\). If \(f(x) = x^2 - x + 1\) has a rational root then it is one of the possibilities \(\pm 1\). But by quick inspection none of them solves \(f(x) = 0\). So \(f(x)\) is irreducible over rationals.

We see \(\alpha^{'}\) is degree \(2\) (power of \(2\)) over \(\QQ\) by \(f(\alpha^{'}) = 0\). Thus \(\alpha^{'}\) is constructible. By bisecting, \(\alpha = \frac{\alpha^{'}}2\) is also constructible. Q.E.D.

Next, based on what has just been proved, rearrange \(f(x) = 0\); we get

\[ x = \sqrt{1 - x^2}.\]

Since \(\alpha = \cos \frac{2\pi}5\) is constructible, then \(\sin \frac{2\pi}5 = \sqrt{1 - \cos^2 \frac{2\pi}5}\) is also constructible. Therefore regular $5$-gon is constructible. Q.E.D.

Problem 29. Find the splitting field \(K\) of \(x^4 - 2\) over \(\QQ\). What is \([K : \QQ]\)?

Solution. We note \(x^4 - 2\) has roots \(\sqrt[4]{2}, \sqrt[4]{2}i, \sqrt[4]{2}(-1), \sqrt[4]{2}(-i)\). The splitting field is therefore \(\QQ(\sqrt[4]{2}, i) = K\).

Next we determine the degree of extension. By tower theorem,

\[ [K : \QQ] = [K : \QQ(\sqrt[4]{2})] [\QQ(\sqrt[4]{2}) : \QQ]. \]

We need to compute \([\QQ(\sqrt[4]{2}) : \QQ]\) first. \([\QQ(\sqrt[4]{2}) : \QQ] = 4\) since \(x^4 - 2\) is irreducible over \(\QQ\).

Then we need to compute \([K : \QQ(\sqrt[4]{2})]\). Note \(i \not \in \QQ(\sqrt[4]{2})\) so \(x^2 + 1\) is irreducible over \(\QQ(\sqrt[4]{2})\), \([K : \QQ(\sqrt[4]{2})] = 2\). Then we get \([K : \QQ] = 2 \cdot 4 = 8\).

Problem 30. Find the splitting field of \(x^4 + x^2 + 1\) over \(\QQ\). What is \([K : \QQ]\)?

Solution. Note

\begin{align*} f(x) &= x^4 + x^2 + 1 \\ &= (x^2+1)^2 - x^2 \\ &= (x^2 + x + 1) (x^2 - x + 1). \end{align*}

We get the roots of \(f(x)\) as

\[ - \frac{1}2 \pm \frac{\sqrt{3}}2 i, \frac{1}2 \pm \frac{\sqrt{3}}2 i. \]

Denote \(\theta = - \frac{1}2 + \frac{\sqrt{3}}2 i\), the four roots are now \(\theta, \bar{\theta}, -\theta, -\bar{\theta}\) in terms of \(\theta\).

Now the splitting field is

\begin{align*} \QQ(\theta, \bar{\theta}) &= \QQ(\theta, -1 - \theta) \\ &= \QQ(\theta). \end{align*}

\([\QQ(\theta) : \QQ] = 2\) since \(\theta\) is a root of \(x^2 + x + 1\) which is irreducible over rationals and \(\theta \not \in \QQ\). Q.E.D.

Problem 31. Suppose \(K/F\) is the splitting field of a polynomial \(f \in F[x]\). Let \(g \in F[x]\) be an irreducible polynomial. Show if \(g\) has a root in \(K\), then it splits completely in \(K[x]\).

Proof. Suppose \(f\) is of degree \(n\) in \(F[x]\), then by \(K/F\) is the splitting field of \(f\), we have \(f\) has \(n\) roots in \(K\) counting multiplicities. Say they are \(\alpha_1, \alpha_2, \ldots, \alpha_n \in K\).

Let \(\beta\) be a root of irreducible polynomial \(g\) in \(K\). Let \(\gamma\) be any root of \(g\). We want to show \(\gamma \in K\).

By Theorem 8 earlier in this chapter, there exists an isomorphism \(\varphi\) such that

\begin{align*} \varphi : F(\beta) &\xrightarrow{\sim} F(\gamma) \\ \beta & \mapsto \gamma . \end{align*}

Let \(K(\beta)\) be the splitting field of \(f\) over \(F(\beta)\) and \(K(\gamma)\) be the splitting field of \(f\) over \(F(\gamma)\). Then \(\varphi\) extends to an isomorphism \(\sigma\) such that

\begin{align*} \begin{array}{rccc} \sigma : & K(\beta) & \xrightarrow{\sim} & K(\gamma) \\ & | & & | \\ \varphi: & F(\beta) & \xrightarrow{\sim} & F(\gamma) \end{array} \end{align*}

\(\beta \in K\) implies \([K : F] = [K(\beta) : F]\). On the other hand, \(K(\beta) \simeq K(\gamma)\). Then \([K : F] = [K(\gamma) : F]\).

We get \(K = K(\gamma)\), i.e, \(\gamma \in K\) as desired. \(g\) splits in \(K\). Q.E.D.

Problem 32. [Dummit & Foote 13.4 #5] Let \(K\) be a finite extension of \(F\). Show \(K\) is a splitting field over \(F\) if and only if every irreducible polynomial in \(F[x]\) having a root in \(K\) splits in \(K[x]\).

Proof. (\(\Rightarrow\)) If \(K\) is a splitting field over \(F\), then there is an \(f(x) \in F[x]\) for which polynomial \(K\) is the splitting field.

Let \(g(x)\) be an arbitrary irreducible polynomial in \(F[x]\) having a root in \(K\), say it is \(\alpha \in K\), \(g(\alpha) = 0\).

Let \(\beta\) be an arbitrary root of \(g(x)\). We want to show \(\beta \in K\). Consider the automorphism (take \(F = F'\) in Theorem 8) \(\varphi : F \xrightarrow{\sim} F\) then by Theorem 8, \(\varphi\) can be extended to an isomorphism \(\sigma\)

\begin{align*} \sigma: F(\alpha) &\xrightarrow{\sim} F(\beta) \\ \alpha & \mapsto \beta , \end{align*}

where \(\alpha, \beta\) are roots of irreducible polynomial \(g \in F[x]\). Consider the diagram

\begin{align*} \begin{array}{rccc} \sigma : & F(\alpha) & \xrightarrow{\sim} & F(\beta) \\ & | & & | \\ \varphi: & F & \xrightarrow{\sim} & F \end{array} \end{align*}

by Theorem 27, \(\sigma\) can be extended further to an isomorphism \(\psi\)

\begin{align*} \begin{array}{rccc} \psi : & K(\alpha) & \xrightarrow{\sim} & K(\beta) \\ & | & & | \\ \varphi: & F(\alpha) & \xrightarrow{\sim} & F(\beta) \end{array} \end{align*}

since \(K(\alpha)\) is the splitting field of \(f \in F(\alpha)[x]\) over \(F(\alpha)\), \(K(\beta)\) is the splitting field of \(f \in F(\beta)[x]\) over \(F(\beta)\).

We have \(K(\alpha) = K\) since \(\alpha \in K\). By the last isomorphism,

\begin{align*} [K(\alpha) : F] &= [K(\beta) : F] \\ &= [K : F]. \end{align*}

We see that \(K(\beta) = K\) so \(\beta \in K\) as desired.

(\(\Leftarrow\)) If every irreducible polynomial in \(F[x]\) having a root in \(K\) splits in \(K[x]\), further recall Theorem 17, \(K\) over \(F\) is a finite extension,

\[ K = F(a_1, \ldots, a_n) \]

for \(a_1, \ldots, a_n\) algebraic over \(F\).

Consider the product of minimal polynomials of \(a_1, \ldots, a_n\)

\[ f(x) = m_{a_1, F}(x)\cdots m_{a_n, F}(x).\]

Notice \(a_i\)’s are also in \(K\), by assumption, \(m_{a_i, F}(x)\) has a root in \(K\) for \(1 \leq i \leq n\).

Then \(f(x)\) as a product polynomial splits in \(K\), i.e., we found a polynomial in \(F[x]\) such that it splits in \(K\). Thus \(K\) is the splitting field of \(f(x) = \prod_i m_{a_i, F}(x)\) over \(F\). Q.E.D.

Problem 33. [Dummit & Foote 13.4 #6] Let \(K_1\) and \(K_2\) be finite extensions of \(F\) contained in \(K\) and both are splitting fields over \(F\).

  • Show composite field \(K_1 K_2\) is a splitting field over \(F\).

    Proof. By \(K_1, K_2\) being splitting fields, there exist respectively \(f_1 \in F[x]\) for which \(K_1\) is the splitting field over \(F\); \(f_2 \in F[x]\) for which \(K_2\) the splitting field over \(F\).

    On the other hand, \(K_1\) can be viewed as a field generated by roots of \(f_1\). \(K_2\) can be viewed as a field generated by roots of \(f_2\). So the composite field \(K_1 K_2\) is a field generated by the union of roots of both \(f_1, f_2\) over \(F\). Hence we have \(f_1 f_2 \in F[x]\) which splits in \(K_1 K_2\). \(K_1 K_2\) is therefore a splitting field. Q.E.D.

  • Show \(K_1 \cap K_2\) is a splitting field over \(F\).

    Proof. By Problem 32, it suffices to show that every irreducible polynomial in \(F[x]\) having a root in \(K_1 \cap K_2\) splits in \(K_1 \cap K_2\). Indeed, let \(f\) be an irreducible polynomial in \(F[x]\) with root \(\alpha in K_1 \cap K_2\). Then \(f\) splits in \(K_1\) completely and in \(K_2\) completely. But both \(K_1\) and \(K_2\) are subfields of \(K\), \(f\) splits in \(K\) which guarantees in \(K\), \(f\) splits in the same manner as in \(K_1\) and \(K_2\) respectively. Therefore \(K_1 \cap K_2\) is a splitting field over \(F\). Q.E.D.

Problem 34. [Dummit & Foote 13.5 #11] Suppose \(K[x]\) is a polynomial ring over the field \(K\) and \(F\) is a subfield of \(K\). If \(F\) is a perfect field and \(f(x) \in F[x]\) has no repeated irreducible factors in \(F[x]\), show \(f(x)\) has no repeated irreducible factors in \(K[x]\).

Proof. Let \(f \in F[x]\) be a monic polynomial having no repeated irreducible factors

\[ f = f_1 f_2 \cdots f_n, \]

with each \(f_i \in F[x]\) distinct and irreducible.

By \(F\) being perfect, \(f\) is separable over \(F\). \(f_1, \ldots, f_n\) all have distinct roots. Hence \(f\) splits in \(\bar{F}\). But \(K\) has \(F\) as a subfield; \(f\) splits in \(\bar{K}\). Therefore \(f\) has no repeated irreducible factors in \(K[x]\) as desired. Q.E.D.

Problem 35. [Dummit & Foote 13.6 #5] Show there are only a finite number of roots of unity in any finite extension \(K\) of \(\QQ\).

Proof. We use contra positive argument to prove the claim. We show if there are infinite number of roots of unity, then \([K : \QQ]\) is not finite.

Suppose \(K\) is some extension of rationals with infinitely many roots of unity. For $k$-th root of unity \(\zeta_k\), we have

\begin{align*} [K : \QQ] &\geq [\QQ(\zeta_k) : \QQ] \\ &= \varphi(k) \\ &\geq \frac{\sqrt{k}}2. \end{align*}

Since there are infinitely many roots of unity in \(K\), \(\varphi \geq \frac{\sqrt{k}}2\) is not bounded from above. Hence \([K : \QQ]\) can be arbitrarily large. Q.E.D.

Problem 36. [Dummit & Foote 14.4 #5] Determine automorphism of extension \(\QQ(\sqrt[4]{2})/\QQ(\sqrt{2})\).

Solution. The minimal polynomial of \(\sqrt[4]{2}\) over \(\QQ(\sqrt{2})\) is \(x^2 - \sqrt{2}\). Therefore \({\rm Aut} \, \QQ(\sqrt[4]{2})/\QQ(\sqrt{2})\) has two elements, the identity and \(\tau : \sqrt[4]{2} \mapsto -\sqrt[4]{2}\). So the automorphism is isomorphic to \(\ZZ/2\ZZ\).

Problem 37. [Dummit & Foote 14.1 #10] Let \(K\) be an extension of field \(F\). Let \(\varphi : K \to K^{'}\) be an isomorphism of \(K\) with a field \(K^{'}\) which maps \(F\) to the subfield \(F^{'}\) of \(K^{'}\). Show the map \(\sigma \mapsto \varphi \sigma \varphi^{-1}\) defines a group isomorphism

\[ \Aut \, (K/F) \xrightarrow{\sim} \Aut \, (K^\prime / F^\prime). \]

Proof. Let \(\psi : \Aut \, (K/F) \to \Aut \, (K^\prime/F^\prime)\), \(\sigma \mapsto \varphi \sigma \varphi^{-1}\) for \(\sigma \in \Aut \, (K/F)\). We note \(\psi\) is a legit map since \(\varphi\) is an isomorphism of \(K\) with \(K^\prime\).

First we show \(\psi\) is a homomorphism. Indeed, for any \(\sigma_1, \sigma_2 \in \Aut \, (K/F)\), we have

\begin{align*} \psi(\sigma_1 \sigma_2) &= (\varphi \sigma_1 \sigma_2 \varphi^{-1}) \\ &= (\varphi \sigma_1 \varphi^{-1}) (\varphi \sigma_2 \varphi^{-1}) \\ &= \psi(\sigma_1) \psi(\sigma_2). \end{align*}

Also for the identity \(e|_K\), it satisfies \(\psi(e|_K) = e|_{K^\prime}\) since

\begin{align*} \psi(e|_K) &= \varphi e|_K \varphi^{-1} \\ &= \varphi \varphi^{-1} \\ &= e|_{K^\prime}. \end{align*}

Next we show \({\rm Ker} \, \psi = e|_K\). Indeed, let \(\psi (\sigma) = e|_{K^\prime}\) for any \(\sigma \in \Aut \, (K/F)\).

\begin{align*} \varphi \sigma \varphi^{-1} &= e|_{K^\prime} \\ \implies \sigma &= \varphi^{-1} e|_{K^\prime} \varphi \\ &= e|_K. \end{align*}

\({\rm Ker}\,\psi\) is trivial implies \(\psi\) is injective.

Lastly, we show \({\rm Im} \, \psi = \Aut \, (K^\prime/F^\prime)\). Indeed, for any \(\tau \in \Aut \, (K^\prime/F^\prime)\), we need to show \(\tau = \varphi \sigma \varphi^{-1}\) for some \(\sigma \in \Aut \, (K/F)\). Applying \(\psi\) to \(\sigma = \varphi^{-1} \tau \varphi\), we get

\begin{align*} \psi (\sigma) &= \varphi (\varphi^{-1}\tau \varphi) \varphi^{-1} \\ &= \tau \in \Aut \, (K^\prime/F^\prime). \end{align*}

So \(\sigma \in \Aut \, (K/F)\) as desired. Therefore \(\psi\) is also surjective. Q.E.D.

Problem 38. [Dummit & Foote 14.2 #2] Determine the minimal polynomial of \(1 + \sqrt[3]{2} + \sqrt[3]{4}\) over \(\QQ\).

Solution. Let \(r = 1 + \sqrt[3]{2} + \sqrt[3]{4}\). We notice

\begin{align*} r - 1 &= \sqrt[3]{2} + \sqrt[3]{4} \\ &= \sqrt[3]{2}(1 + \sqrt[3]{2}). \end{align*}

Raise both sides to the third power,

\begin{align*} (r - 1)^3 &= 2(1+\sqrt[3]{2})^3 \\ &= 2(1 + 3 \sqrt[3]{2} + 3(\sqrt[3]{2})^2 + (\sqrt[3]{2})^3) \\ &= 2(3 + 3(\sqrt[3]{2} + \sqrt[3]{4})) \\ &= 2(3 + 3(r-1)) \\ &= 6r. \end{align*}

Therefore \(r\) is a root of \(x^3 - 2x^2 - 3x - 1\). Next we need to show this is the minimal polynomial. Assume it is not, it has a linear factor, i.e., \(r\) is rational. This is impossible since if were the case, then

\[ \underbrace{1}_{\rm rational}\cdot (\sqrt[3]{2})^2 + \underbrace{1}_{\rm rational} \cdot \sqrt[3]{2} + \underbrace{(1-r)}_{\rm rational} = 0, \]

which implies \(\sqrt[3]{2}\) has degree of \(2\) instead of \(3\). A contradiction.

Therefore \(x^3 - 3x^2 - 3x - 1\) is the minimal polynomial of \(r = 1 + \sqrt[3]{2} + \sqrt[3]{4}\) over \(\QQ\). Q.E.D.

Problem 39. [Dummit & Foote 14.2 #4] Let \(p\) be a prime. Determine the elements of Galois group of \(x^p - 2\).

Solution. Working with prime \(2\). By Eisenstein’s criterion, \(x^p - 2\) is irreducible over \(\QQ\). Then the splitting field of \(x^p - 2\) over \(\QQ\) is \(\QQ(\sqrt[p]{2}, \zeta)\), where \(\zeta\) is the $p$-th root of unity.

For \([\QQ(\zeta) : \QQ]\), its degree is

\begin{align*} [\QQ(\zeta) : \QQ] &= \varphi(p) \\ &= p - 1. \end{align*}

For \([\QQ(\sqrt[p]{2}) : \QQ]\), its degree is

\[ [\QQ(\sqrt[p]{2}) : \QQ] = p. \]

We note \(p\) and \(p-1\) are relatively prime, therefore

\[ [\QQ(\sqrt[p]{2}, \zeta) : \QQ] = p(p-1). \]

Denote the splitting field \(K = \QQ(\sqrt[p]{2}, \zeta)\). Let \(\alpha = \sqrt[p]{2}\).

Note that \({\rm Gal} \, (K/\QQ)\) can be generated by two elements \(\tau, \sigma\):

\begin{align*} \tau(\alpha) &= \alpha \\ \tau(\zeta) &= \zeta^m , \end{align*}

where \(1 \leq m \leq p - 1, m \in \ZZ\). \(\tau \in {\rm Gal} \, (K/\QQ)\) has order \(p-1\).

\begin{align*} \sigma(\alpha) &= \alpha \zeta \\ \sigma(\zeta) &= \zeta. \end{align*}

\(\sigma \in {\rm Gal} \, (K/\QQ)\) has order \(p\).

We found \(\tau\) due to the fact that \(K/\QQ(\alpha)\) is Galois and for \(\psi \in {\rm Gal} \, (K/\QQ(\alpha))\) (of order \(p-1\)) \(\psi(\zeta)\) is another $p$-th root of unity and there are \(p-1\) elements of the group of units of a finite field \(\FF_p\), \(\FF_p^\times = p-1\) and \(\FF_p^\times = \langle q \rangle\), \(1 \leq q \leq p - 1\) is cyclic.

\(\sigma\) was found due to the fact both \(\alpha\) and \(\alpha \zeta\) are roots of \(x^p - 2\). If there is some \(\sigma_1\) such that \(\sigma_1 (\alpha) = \alpha \zeta\) but \(\sigma_1 (\zeta) = \zeta^k\), then find a \(\tau\) in the previous case such that \(\tau \sigma_1(\zeta) = \tau(\zeta^k) = \zeta\). \(\tau \sigma_1\) the has the same effect as \(\sigma\).

Combining the two cases, \({\rm Gal}\, (K/\QQ) = \langle \tau, \sigma \rangle\).

Problem 40. [Dummit & Foote 14.2 #13] Show if the Galois group of the splitting field of a cubic over \(\QQ\) is the cyclic group of order \(3\). Then all the roots of the cubic are real.

Proof. First off, a cubit in \(\QQ[x]\) has a linear factor. So at least one of the roots is real. As for the other two, assume one of the is complex and consider the action of conjugation on this complex root. For a complex root \(z \in \CC \setminus \RR\),

\begin{align*} \tau(\tau(z)) &= \tau(\bar{z}) \\ &= z. \end{align*}

So \(\tau^2\) fixes \(z\). Obviously \(\tau\) fixes \(\QQ\). \(\tau\) belongs to the Galois group of the splitting field of this cubic over \(\QQ\).

However \(\tau\) has order \(2\) not dividing \(3\) (the order of the cyclic group). A contradiction. Therefore the other two roots are also real. Q.E.D.

Problem 41. [Dummit & Foote 14.2 #15] Let \(F\) be a field of \({\rm char} (F) \neq 2\).

  • If \(K = F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2})\) where \(D_1, D_2 \in F\) have the property that none of \(D_1, D_2, D_1 D_2\) is a square in \(F\). Show that \(K/F\) is a Galois extension with \({\rm Gal}\, (K/F) \simeq\) Klein Vierergrouppe.

    Proof. \(D_1, D_2\) are not squares in \(F\). So \(F(\sqrt{D_1})\) and \(F(\sqrt{D_2})\) are quadratic extensions over \(F\) of degree \(2\). And both are Galois. Since \(\sqrt{D_1} \not \in F(\sqrt{D_2})\) and \(\sqrt{D_2} \not \in F(\sqrt{D_1})\), the field compositum \(F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2})\) is degree \(4\).

    Among all the small groups of degree \(4\), the only possibilities are \(\ZZ/4\ZZ\) and Vierergrouppe. We only need to rule out \(\ZZ/4\ZZ\) to prove the claim we want.

    Consider \(\sigma_1 : \sqrt{D_1} \mapsto - \sqrt{D_2}\) and \(\sigma_2 : \sqrt{D_2} \mapsto - \sqrt{D_2}\). We have \(\sigma_1, \sigma_2 \in {\rm Gal}\, (K/F)\) and \(\sigma_1^2 = \sigma_2^2 = \sigma_1 \sigma_2 = {\rm Id}\). Therefore they cannot be in the cyclic group \(\ZZ/4\ZZ\). \({\rm Gal}\, (K/F) \simeq K_4\). Q.E.D.

  • Show the converse of the previous question is also true.

    Proof. It suffices to show that \(K = F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2})\) is a biquadratic extension. The subgroup of Galois group \({\rm Gal}\, (K/F) \simeq K_4\) corresponds to subfields of \(K/F\). So the subfields include two of degree \(2\) and they are distinct.

    We have

    \begin{align*} [F(\sqrt{D_1}) : F] &= 2, \\ [F(\sqrt{D_2}) : F] &= 2 \end{align*}

    and \(\sqrt{D_1} \not \in F(\sqrt{D_2})\), \(\sqrt{D_2} \not \in F(\sqrt{D_1})\). Therefore \([F(\sqrt{D_1 D_2}) : F(\sqrt{D_1})] = 2\)

    By tower theorem,

    \begin{align*} [K : F] &= [K : F(\sqrt{D_1})] [F(\sqrt{D_1}) : F] \\ \implies [K : F] &= 2 \cdot 2, \end{align*}

    where \(K = F(\sqrt{D_1}, \sqrt{D_2})\). \(K\) is the splitting field of

    \[ (x+\sqrt{D_1})(x-\sqrt{D_1})(x+\sqrt{D_2})(x-\sqrt{D_2}). \]

    None of \(D_1, D_2, D_1 D_2\) is a square in \(F\). Q.E.D.

Problem 42. [Dummit & Foote 14.2 #17] Let \(K/F\) be a finite extension and \(\alpha \in K\). Let \(L\) be a Galois extension of \(F\) containing \(K\) and \(H \leq {\rm Gal}\, (L/F)\) be the subgroup corresponding to \(K\). Define the norm of \(\alpha\) from \(K\) to \(F\)

\[ N_{K/F} (\alpha) = \prod_\sigma \sigma(\alpha) \]

over all the embeddings of \(K\) into algebraic closure of \(F\); \(\sigma(\alpha)\) Galois conjugates of \(\alpha\).

  • Show \(N_{K/F}(\alpha) \in F\).

    Proof. \(H\) is the subgroup of \({\rm Gal}\, (L/F)\) corresponding to \(K\). So \(K\) is the fixed field of \(H\). A coset \(\sigma H \in {\rm Gal}\,(L/K)\) is identified with \(\sigma\). Then

    \[ N_{K/F}(\alpha) = \sum_{{\rm cosets\ of}\, \sigma H} \sigma(\alpha). \]

    Given a \(\tau \in {\rm Gal}\, (L/F)\),

    \begin{align*} \tau N_{K/F} (\alpha) &= \tau \sum_{{\rm cosets}\, \sigma H} \sigma(\alpha) \\ &= \sum_{{\rm cosets}\, \tau \sigma H} \tau \sigma(\alpha) \\ &= \tau \sum_{{\rm cosets}\, \sigma H} \sigma(\alpha) \\ &= N_{K/F} (\alpha). \end{align*}

    The third equality holds because \(\tau\) only permutes elements so the cosets \(\tau \sigma H\) over all \(\sigma\)’s are the same as the cosets \(\sigma H\) over all \(\sigma\)’s. This shows \(\tau\) fixes \(N_{K/F}(\alpha)\). So we get \(N_{K/F}(\alpha) \in F\) as desired.

  • Show \(N_{K/F}(\alpha \beta) = N_{K/F} (\alpha) N_{K/F} (\beta)\), i.e., the defined norm is multiplicative.

    Proof.

    \begin{align*} N_{K/F}(\alpha \beta) &= \prod_\sigma \sigma(\alpha \beta) \\ &= \prod_\sigma \sigma(\alpha) \sigma(\beta) \\ &= \prod_\sigma \sigma(\alpha) \prod_\sigma \sigma(\beta) \\ &= N_{K/F}(\alpha) N_{K/F}(\beta). \end{align*}

    The second equality holds because \(\sigma\) is a homomorphism. The third equality holds because we rearranged terms. The last equality holds according to definition the norm. Q.E.D.

  • Let \(K = F(\sqrt{D})\) be a quadratic extension of \(F\). Show \(N_{K/F}(a+b\sqrt{D}) = a^2 - b^2 D\).

    Proof. \(\sqrt{D}\) solves the equation \(x^2 - D = 0\), then \(x^2 - D\) splits in \(K\). So \(K/F\) is a Galois extension. Any \(\sigma \in {\rm Gal}\, (K/F)\) permutes the roots of \(x^2 - D\). Therefore \(\sigma\) is either identity or such that \(\sqrt{D} \mapsto - \sqrt{D}\).

    Then we have

    \begin{align*} N_{K/F}(a+b\sqrt{D}) &= \prod_\sigma \sigma(a +b \sqrt{D}) \\ &= (a+b\sqrt{D})(a - b\sqrt{D})\\ &= a^2 - b^2 D. \end{align*}

    The second equality holds because one \(\sigma\) is identity and the other is conjugation. Q.E.D.

  • Let \(m_\alpha(x) = x^d + a_{d-1}x^{d-1} + \cdots + a_1 x + a_0 \in F[x]\) be the minimal polynomial for \(\alpha \in K\) over \(F\). Denote \(n = [K : F]\). Show \(d \mid n\) and there are \(d\) distinct Galois conjugates of \(\alpha\) which all repeat \(\frac{n}d\) times in the product. Further conclude \(N_{K/F} (\alpha) = (-1)^n a_0^{\frac{n}d}\).

    Proof. Since \(\alpha \in K\), by tower theorem applied to \(K \supset F(\alpha) \supset F\), we have

    \[ [K : F] = [K : F(\alpha)] [F(\alpha) : F ]. \]

    \([F(\alpha) : F]\) is \(d\) by \(m_\alpha(x)\) being the minimal polynomial over \(F\) for \(\alpha\). So we get \(n = [K : F(\alpha)] \cdot d\) which implies \(d \mid n\). \(L/F\) is an extension that is Galois; \(K\) is an intermediate field over \(F\), \(F \subset K \subset L\) therefore \(K/F\) is Galois, separable.

    Then \(m_\alpha(x)\) over \(F\) has \(d\) distinct roots.

    For any \(\sigma \in {\rm Gal}\, (K/F)\), it is sending \(\alpha\) to a root of \(m_\alpha(x)\). \(|{\rm Gal}\,(K/F)| = n\). So \(\alpha\) is sent \(\frac{n}d\) many times to a root of \(m_\alpha(x)\).

    \begin{align*} N_{K/F}(\alpha) &= \prod_\sigma \sigma(\alpha) \\ &= \left( \prod_{i=1}^d \alpha_i \right)^{\frac{n}d}. \end{align*}

    The constant term of \(m_\alpha(x)\) by Vieta’s formula satisfies

    \[ a_0 = (-1)^d \prod_{i=1}^d \alpha_i. \]

    Therefore

    \begin{align*} N_{K/F} (\alpha) &= \left((-1)^d a_0 \right)^{\frac{n}d}\\ &= (-1)^n a_0^{\frac{n}d}. \end{align*}

Problem 43. Let \(K/F\) be a Galois extension. For \(\alpha \in K\), \(T_\alpha : K \to K\) given by \(T_\alpha(\beta) = \alpha \beta\) is $F$-linear transformation. Let \(A\) be the associated matrix with respect to \(F\) basis in \(K\). Show that \(N_{K/F}(\alpha) = \det (A)\).

Proof. As in the previous problem, use the notation of minimal polynomial of \(\alpha \in K\) over \(F\).

\begin{align*} m_\alpha (T_\alpha) (\beta) &= \sum_{i=1}^d a_i (T_\alpha)^i(\beta) \\ &= \sum_{i=1}^d a_i (\alpha^i \beta) \\ &= \underbrace{\sum_{i=1}^d a_i (\alpha^i)}_{= 0} \beta. \end{align*}

Therefore the minimal polynomial of \(T_\alpha\) is the same as \(m_\alpha(x)\). Let \(p(x) = x^n + \cdots + b_1 x + b_0\) be the characteristic polynomial of \(T_\alpha\). \(p(x)\) and minimal polynomial \(m(x)\) have the same roots and \(m(x) \mid p(x)\), \(m(x)\) irreducible. Then the irreducible factors of \(p(x)\) is \(m(x)\). We get \(p(x)\) is some power of \(m(x)\), \(p(x) = \left( m(x) \right)^{\frac{n}d}\). By previous problem,

\begin{align*} N_{K/F} (\alpha) &= (-1)^n a_0^{\frac{n}d} \\ &= (-1)^n b_0 \\ &= \det (T_\alpha) \\ &= \det (A). \end{align*}

Problem 44. [Dummit & Foote 14.2 #2] Find a primitive generator for \(\QQ(\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3}, \sqrt{5})\) over \(\QQ\).

Proof. Denote \(\alpha = \sqrt{2} + \sqrt{3} + \sqrt{5}\) and consider

\[ \sigma \in {\rm Gal}\, (\QQ(\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3}, \sqrt{5})/\QQ).\]

\(\sigma\) does not fix \(\alpha\). \(\QQ(\alpha)\) is the fixed field of trivial subgroup of \({\rm Gal}\, (\QQ(\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3}, \sqrt{5})/\QQ)\). Therefore \(\QQ(\alpha) = \QQ(\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3}, \sqrt{5})\). \(\alpha\) is a primitive element of \(\QQ(\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3}, \sqrt{5})/\QQ\). Q.E.D.

Problem 45. [Dummit & Foote 14.4 #2] Determine the Galois group of

  • \(x^3 - x^2 - 4\).

    Solution. The polynomial factors into \((x-2)(x^2 + x+ 2)\) and the discriminant of \(x^2 +x +2\) is \(-7\), irreducible. The Galois group is \(S_2\).

  • \(x^3 - 2x + 4\).

    Solution. It has the factorization \((x+2)(x^2 - 2x +2)\). \(x^2 - 2x+2\) is irreducible similar to previous question. Therefore the Galois group is \(S_2\).

  • \(x^3 - x+1\).

    Solution. By rational root theorem, the only possible roots are \(\pm 1\) but none of them is actually a root by quick inspection,

    \begin{align*} 1^3 - 1 + 1 &\neq 0,\\ (-1)^3 - (-1) +1 &\neq 0. \end{align*}

    Hence \(x^3 - x+1\) is irreducible. The discriminant of \(x^3 - x+1\) is computed as \((-4)(-1)^3 - 27(1)^2 = -23\), which is not a square. Therefore the Galois group is \(S_3\).

  • \(x^3 - x^2 - 2x + 1\).

    Solution. Similar to previous question, the only possible roots \(\pm 1\) are not actual roots by quick inspection. Hence the polynomial is irreducible. To compute the discriminant, follow the formula for \(x^3 - x^2 - 2x + 1 (= x^3 + ax^2 + bx + c)\). The discriminant \(D = -4 p^3 - 27 q^2\) whereas \(p = \frac{1}3(3b - a^2), q = \frac{1}{27}(2a^3 - 9ab +27c)\). Plugging in the numbers, we get \(p = -\frac{7}3, q = -\frac{7}{27}, D = 49\). The discriminant is a square. Therefore the Galois group is \(A_3\).

Problem 46. [Dummit & Foote 14.6 #4] Determine the Galois group of \(x^4 - 25\).

Solution. \(x^4 - 25\) factors as \((x^2 - 5)(x^2 + 5)\). The splitting field is \(\QQ(\sqrt{5}, i)\). And \([\QQ(\sqrt{5}, i) : \QQ] = 4\). The Galois group is either \(\ZZ/4\ZZ\) or Klein Vierergrouppe. Note

\begin{align*} \sigma_1 : \left\{ \begin{array}{rcl} \sqrt{5} & \mapsto & \sqrt{5} \\ i & \mapsto & -i \end{array} \right. \end{align*}

has order \(2\); so does \(\sigma_2\)

\begin{align*} \sigma_2 : \left\{ \begin{array}{rcl} \sqrt{5} & \mapsto & -\sqrt{5} \\ i & \mapsto & i \end{array} \right. . \end{align*}

Therefore the Galois group is Klein Vierergrouppe \(\ZZ/2\ZZ \times \ZZ/2\ZZ\).

Problem 47. [Dummit & Foote 14.7 #4] Let \(K = \QQ(\sqrt[n]{a})\), \(a \in \QQ\), \(a > 0\) and suppose \([K : \QQ] = n\) (\(x^n - a\) is irreducible.) Let \(E\) be any subfield of \(K\) with \([E : \QQ] = d\). Show \(E = \QQ(\sqrt[d]{a})\).

Proof. By hint, consider \(N_{K/E}(\sqrt[n]{a}) \in E\). Note \(a > 0\), \(\sqrt[n]{a} \in \RR_{>0}\), \(\QQ \subset E \subset K\), \([E : \QQ] = d\) and \([K : \QQ] = n\).

\begin{align*} N_{K/E} (\sqrt[n]{a})&= \prod_\sigma \sigma (\sqrt[n]{a}) \\ &= \left( \prod_{j=1}^m \sigma_j (\sqrt[n]{a}) \right)^{[K:E]} \\ &= \left( \prod_{j=1}^m \sigma_j \right) (\sqrt[n]{a})^{\frac{n}d}, \end{align*}

where \(\sigma_j (\sqrt[n]{a})\), \(j = 1, \ldots, m\) are the roots of minimal polynomial of \(\sqrt[n]{a}\) over \(E\). \(N_{K/E} (\sqrt[n]{a}) \in E \subset K\) and \(K\) is a subfield of \(\RR\) (the real numbers). Then \(\prod_j \sigma_j (\sqrt[n]{a}) = (\pm 1)(\sqrt[n]{a})^{\frac{n}d}\) since \(\pm 1\) are the only real roots of unity. We get

\[ N_{K/E} (\sqrt[n]{a}) = (\pm 1) \sqrt[d]{a}. \]

Then the minimal polynomial of \(\sqrt[d]{a}\) is of degree \(d\) over \(\QQ\). On the other hand \([E :\QQ] = d\). We conclude \(E = \QQ(\sqrt[d]{a})\) as desired. Q.E.D.

Problem 48. [Dummit & Foote 14.7 #12] Let \(L\) be the Galois closure of the finite extension \(\QQ(\alpha)\) of \(\QQ\). For any prime \(p\) dividing the order of \({\rm Gal}\, (L/\QQ)\), show there is a subfield \(F\) of \(L\) with \([L:F]=p\) and \(L = F(\alpha)\).

Proof. A prime \(p\) divides the order \({\rm Gal}\, (L/\QQ)\) means there is a \(\sigma \in {\rm Gal}\, (L/\QQ)\) of order \(p\). The subgroup generated by \(\sigma\) has order \(p\) so by main theorem of Galois this subgroup corresponds to some subfield such that \([L : F] = p\).

If for all \(\sigma \in {\rm Gal}\, (L/\QQ)\) we have \(\sigma(\alpha) \in F\), then \(L = F\) itself. So there must be some \(\sigma \in {\rm Gal}\, (L/\QQ)\) such that \(\sigma(\alpha) \not \in F\).

Let \(m_\alpha\) be the minimal polynomial of \(\alpha\) over \(\QQ\). Its roots are \(r_1, \ldots, r_{[\QQ(\alpha):\QQ]}\). Pick \(\tau \in {\rm Gal}\, (L/\QQ)\) such that \(\tau(r_j) = \alpha\) for some \(1 \leq j \leq [\QQ(\alpha): \QQ]\). Observe

\[ [L : \tau(F)] = [L : F] = p\]

and \(\alpha \not \in \tau(F)\), \(p\) is prime. Then \(\tau(F)\) is the desired “\(F\)” in the problem because \(\tau(F) (\alpha) \neq \tau(F)\) implies \(\tau(F)(\alpha) = L\). Q.E.D.

Problem 49. [Dummit & Foote 14.7 #13] Let \(F\) be a subfield of the reals \(\RR\). Let \(a\) be an element of \(F\) and let \(K = F(\sqrt[n]{a})\) where \(\sqrt[n]{a}\) is the real $n$-th root of \(a\). Show if \(L\) is any Galois extension of \(F\) contained in \(K\) then \([L:F] \leq 2\).

Proof. Let \([L:F] = m\) the degree of extension. For \(a \in F\), \(F(\sqrt[m]{a}) \subset L\). On the other hand, \(L\) is a Galois extension of \(F\) in \(K\), it contains the $m$-th root of unity. Note \(K\) is subset of reals, the only real roots of unity are \(\pm 1\). Square roots of \(1\) are real roots of unity, \(m \leq 2\). Therefore \([L : F] \leq 2\). Q.E.D.

Problem 50. Let \(K\) be a field. \((x,y)\) are coordinates of \(K^2\) varieties.

  • Let \(V\) be the $x$-axis, \(V = \VV (y)\). Show \(V\) is irreducible.

    Proof. \(V\) is irreducible if and only if \(\II(V)\) is a prime ideal. Next \(K[x,y]/(y) \simeq K[x]\) is an integral domain. Therefore \(V\) is irreducible by \(\II(V) = (y)\) being prime.

  • Show \(V = \VV (x-y)\) is irreducible.

    Proof. Similar to previous question, we need to show \((x- y)\) is prime. Let \(f, g, h \in K[x,y]\) and \(fg = h(x-y)\). We want to show either \(f \in (x-y)\) or \(g \in (x-y)\), i.e., \((x-y)\) must appear in either \(f\) or \(g\) if \(fg = h(x-y)\). We can assume \(x - y = fg\) and argue either \(f\) or \(g\) is a constant.

    \(x- y\) is of degree \(1\), say \(g\in K[y]\), if \(g \in K\) then we are done. If \(g \in K[y]\) then \(f \in K[x]\) must be a zero degree polynomial, i.e., \(f\) is constant. So we proved \(f \in (x-y)\) or \(g \in (x-y)\).

    \((x-y)\) is prime implies \(V\) is irreducible as desired. Q.E.D.

Misc., Intro Abstract Algebra

\(\ZZ[\sqrt{-5}]\) is not a UFD and \(\RR[x,y] / (x^2+y^2+1)\) is not either.

sage code,

sage: R = ZZ[sqrt(-5)]
sage: R in UniqueFactorizationDomains()
False
sage: Rxy.<x,y> = RR[]
sage: Rxy
Multivariate Polynomial Ring in x, y over Real Field with 53 bits of precision
sage: RxyQuo = quotient(Rxy,x^2+y^2+1)
sage: RxyQuo
Quotient of Multivariate Polynomial Ring in x, y over Real Field with 53 bits of precision by the ideal (x^2 + y^2 + 1.00000000000000)
sage: RxyQuo in EuclideanDomains()
False

Find all the integers \(n\) such that \(n^2 + 45\) is a square.

Use magma,

// solve n^2 + 45 is a square 

clear;

ei := GetEchoInput();
SetEchoInput(true);

function findN(i)
  while true do 
    if (i+1)^2 - i^2 gt 45 then
      N := i;
      break;
    end if;

    i +:= 1;
  end while;

  return N;
end function;

N := findN(1);

print N;
23
pair := {<m, n>: n in [1..N], m in [1..N] | m^2 eq n^2 +45 and IsSquare(m^2) eq true};

print pair;
{ <7, 2>, <23, 22>, <9, 6> }
SetEchoInput(ei);

Find the solutions to \(ABC = A! + B! + C!\) where \(A, B, C\) are digits.

Use magma one liner,

// solve ABC = A! + B! + C!
ei := GetEchoInput();
SetEchoInput(true);
time soln := {<A, B, C> : A in [0..9], B in [0..9], C in [0..9] |
	      100*A + 10*B + C eq Factorial(A) + Factorial(B) + Factorial(C)};
print soln;
{ <1, 4, 5> }
SetEchoInput(ei);

Field that is infinite but with nonzero characteristic?

An example is given on stackexchange.

Is there an isomorphic map from \( \mathbb Q / \mathbb Z \) to \( [0, 1] \)?

Quotient group \( \mathbb Q / \mathbb Z \) is countable since \( \mathbb Q / \mathbb Z = \{ \{q + z: z \in \mathbb{Z} \} : q \in \mathbb{Q} \} \). However \( [0, 1] \) is not countable. So there is no isomorphic map \( \mathbb Q / \mathbb Z \) to \( [0, 1] \).

Show ideal \(I = \left( 3, 2 + \sqrt{-5} \right)\) is a prime ideal in ring \(\ZZ \left[ \sqrt{-5} \right]\).

Proof. It suffices to show \(I\) is maximal. Adjoin a ring element \(a + b \sqrt{-5} \in R\), \(a, b \in \ZZ\) to \(I\) and consider the ideal \((I, a + b\sqrt{-5})\). Note \(\sqrt{-5} \equiv -2 \bmod 2 + \sqrt{-5}\).

\begin{align*} (I, a + b\sqrt{-5}) &= (I, a-2b) \\ &= (3, 2+\sqrt{-5}, a - 2b) \\ &= \left\{ \begin{array}{ll} (3, 2+\sqrt{-5}), & \text{ if $\gcd(3, a -2b) = 3$;} \\ (1), & \text{ if $\gcd(3, a - 2b) = 1$.} \end{array} \right. \end{align*}

Then we see \(I\) is maximal since ideals generated by \(I\) and any other ring element is the ring itself.

Sketch of Proof. Consider

\begin{align*} \frac{\ZZ\left[\sqrt{-5}\right]}{\left(3, 2 + \sqrt{-5}\right)} & \cong \frac{\ZZ[x]/(x^2 + 5)}{(3, 2 + x, x^2 + 5)/(x^2 + 5)} \\ & \cong \frac{\ZZ[x]}{(3, 2+x, x^2 + 5)}. \end{align*}
sage: R = ZZ[sqrt(-5)]
sage: I = R.ideal(3,2+sqrt(-5))
sage: I.is_prime()
True
sage: I
Fractional ideal (3, a + 2)
sage: R
Maximal Order in Number Field in a with defining polynomial x^2 + 5

Give an example of an integral domain where gcd does not exist.

Consider the factorization of \(6 = 2\times 3 = (1+\sqrt{-5})(1-\sqrt{-5})\) in \(\ZZ[\sqrt{-5}]\). Then consider the common divisors of \(6\) and \(2+2\sqrt{-5}\). \(2\) and \(1+\sqrt{-5}\) are two common divisors but they do not divide each other.

Prime ideals in UFD

In a UFD, every prime ideal is generated by a prime element. Otherwise there can be prime ideals generated by non prime elements, e.g., \(I = \left( 3, 2 + \sqrt{-5} \right)\) in \(\ZZ \left[ \sqrt{-5} \right]\). It is not generated by a single element.

Unsorted

  • The failure of factorization domain to be a UFD is because of the failure of irreducibles to be primes.
  • Another proof of Chinese remainder theorem. Given the setting

    \[ \left\{ \begin{array}{ll} x \equiv x_1 & \bmod m \\ x \equiv x_2 & \bmod n \end{array} \right. , \]

    where \(\gcd (m, n) = 1\) and \(x_1, x_2, m, n \in \ZZ\). Show there is a unique solution \(x \in \ZZ /mn \ZZ\) to this system of congruence equations.

    Sketch of Proof. Consider the map

    \begin{align*} \varphi: \ZZ /mn \ZZ & \to \ZZ /m \ZZ \times \ZZ /n \ZZ \\ \varphi: \hspace{5.5mm} [x]_{mn} & \mapsto ([x]_m, [x]_n), \end{align*}

    where \([x]_{mn} \triangleq x \bmod mn\), \([x]_m \triangleq x \bmod m\), and \([x]_n \triangleq x \bmod n\) are equivalent classes of \([x]\) modulo each different modulus respectively.

    First note that since \(\gcd(m,n) = 1\), \(\exists~a, b \in \ZZ\) such that \(am + bn = 1\). Consider the following map

    \begin{align*} \psi: \ZZ /m \ZZ \times \ZZ /n \ZZ & \to \ZZ /mn \ZZ \\ \psi: \hspace{9mm} ([x]_m, [x]_n) & \mapsto \big[ am[x]_n + bn[x]_m \big]_{mn}. \end{align*}

    Then, it is our job to verify that \(\psi \circ \varphi = \rm{id}_1\) is the identity map in \(\ZZ /mn \ZZ\). Similarly we can verify that \(\varphi \circ \psi = \rm{id}_2\) is the identity map in \(\ZZ /m \ZZ \times \ZZ /n \ZZ\). Hence \(\varphi\) is bijiective. (Map being surjective means solution exists; injective means the solution is unique.) Q.E.D.

  • Let \([a]\) be an non-invertible element in \(\ZZ /n \ZZ\). It is easy to see that the map defined by left multiplication with fixed \([a]\)

    \begin{align*} L_{[a]}: \ZZ /n \ZZ & \to \ZZ /n \ZZ \\ L_{[a]}: \hspace{7.5mm} [b] & \mapsto [a][b], \end{align*}

    is not surjective. (\([1] \neq [a][b]\) for any \([b]\) since \([a]\) is not invertible.)

    By counting argument, \(L_{[a]}\) cannot be injective either since for a finite set, a map defined on which is injective if and only if it is surjective.

  • Verify the product of permutations in cycle notations. For example, compute \(\big((1256)(34)\big) \big((135)(26)\big)\). Use the following magma code,

    // create a symmetric group on a set of cardinality 6
    S := SymmetricGroup(6); 
    // define the first permutation using coercion
    q := S!(1,2,5,6)(3,4);
    // define the second permutation
    r := S!(1,3,5)(2,6);
    // precedence of multiplication in code is opposite to maths on paper
    r*q; 
    

    The result is (1, 4, 3, 6, 5, 2). (To load the code from a text file, use > load "FILENAME" in magma prompt.)

    In magma, q^r also makes sense. It refers to conjugation of q by r. This operation is equivalent to r^{-1}*q*r. Conjugation in exponential notation also respects the rules

    \[ \label{eqn:gp_conj} \tag{*} y^{(xz)} = (y^x)^z \mbox{ and } y^e = y \]

    for all \(x, y, z \in G\). Had the conjugation been defined as \(\sigma_x(y) = x y x^{-1}\), then \eqref{eqn:gp_conj} would have failed, since

    \begin{align*} y^x \triangleq x y x^{-1} \implies y^{xz} &= xz y (xz)^{-1} \\ &= xz y z^{-1}x^{-1}, \end{align*}

    while

    \begin{align*} (y^x)^z &= (x y x^{-1})^z \\ &= z x y x^{-1} z^{-1}. \end{align*}

    Lang’s conjugation notation: \(\sigma_{x^{-1}} = x^{-1} y x = y^x\). There is a remark on group actions on a set where Lang said acting on the left is confusing. By a group action on a set, he meant a map \(G \times S \to S\) such that for all \(x, y \in G\) and \(s \in S\)

    • \((xy) s = x(ys)\), i.e., product of group elements acting on set elements has the same effect as group elements acting on set elements sequentially;
    • And \(es = s\).

    The generic notation for this map in terms of elements is \((g, s) \mapsto gs\). But we defined conjugation as \((g, s) \mapsto gsg^{-1}\). Therefore when it comes to conjugation as an action, the “\(gs\)” part could give the impression that it might be generic notation of group action or engaging \(s \in S\) with \(g \in G\) in the definition of conjugation. This is where the confusion kicks in and that is the motivation of introducing exponential notation for conjugation.

    A nonexample: Consider a group \(G\) acting on a set \(X\) on the right.

    \[ \Phi_g: G \to {\rm Sym} (X), \]

    for \(x \in X\), define \(\Phi_{(g)} (x) := x g\). Check if this is a group action. For \(g, h \in G\),

    \[ \Phi_{(g)} \Phi_{(h)} (x) = x h g, \]

    However,

    \[ \Phi_{(gh)} (x) = x g h. \]

    Thus, acting on the right does not form a group action. To remedy this, instead of multiplying \(g\) on the right, we can multiply \(g^{-1}\) on the right to make acting on the right become a group action.

  • Naming convention for example Groups.
    • \(D_n\): Dihedral group formed by symmetries of $n$-gons. In geometry convention, this is a group of order \(2n\); In abstract algebra convention, this is group of order \(n\).
    • \(S_n\): Symmetric group formed by permutations of \(n\) objects.
    • \(A_n\): Alternating group formed by even permutations of \(S_n\).
    • \(Z_n\): Cyclic group of order \(n\). Note this is not the same group as \(\ZZ /n \ZZ\) but they are isomorphic.
  • We know that \((\ZZ /n \ZZ, +)\) is the additive group of integers modulo \(n\). It is easy to find the inverse, i.e., the negation \(\forall~ a \in \ZZ /n \ZZ\). Now consider \(n = p\) prime, we have \(\big((\ZZ /p \ZZ)^\times, \cdot \big)\) the multiplicative group of integers modulo \(n\). Is there a quick way to find the inverse of \(a \in (\ZZ /p \ZZ)^\times\)? By Fermat’s Little Theorem, we have \(a^p \equiv a \bmod p\). Then the inverse of \(a\) can be quickly computed by rewriting the previous congruence as \(a^{p-2} \equiv a^{-1} \bmod p\), i.e., \(a^{p-2} \bmod p\) is the inverse of \(a\).

    For general \(n \in \ZZ\), we can apply Euler’s Theorem, i.e., for any integer \(a\) we have \(a^{\varphi(n)} \equiv a \bmod n\). Similar to the case when \(n = p\) (\(p\) is prime), \(a^{\varphi(n) - 2} \bmod n\) is the inverse of \(a \in (\ZZ /n \ZZ)^\times\).

  • Find all the generators of \((\ZZ / 14 \ZZ)^\times = \{ k \bmod 14 : k \in \ZZ, \gcd (k,14) = 1 \} = \{ [1], [3], [5], [9], [11], [13] \}\).

    Outline of Strategy. The order of \((\ZZ /14 \ZZ)^\times\) is \(6\) since \(\varphi(14) = \varphi(2)\varphi(7) = 6\). Also because \(14 = 2\cdot 7^1\) is of the form of twice an odd prime power, by primitive root theorem, the primitive root modulo \(14\) exists, i.e., there exists a generator of the multiplicative group modulo \(14\). Look up in the table of primitive roots modulo prime numbers less than 100 ([Strayer2001], Table 5.1), \(3\) is the least primitive root modulo \(7\). By [Strayer2001], Corollary 5.18, \(3\) is also a primitive root modulo \(2\cdot 7\). (Intuitively \(\varphi(2p^k) = \varphi(2)\varphi(p^k) = \varphi(p^k)\) for an odd prime \(p\).)

    From this point on, we can bootstrap from the first primitive root modulo \(14\) we just found out, which is \(3\). For a prime \(p = 7\), there are exactly \(\varphi(\varphi(7)) = \varphi(2) \varphi(3) = 2\) incongruent primitive roots modulo \(7\). How to find the one other than \(3\)? Well, since \(3\) is a primitive root, there is a bijection between the set \(\{ 1, 3, 3^2, 3^3, 3^4, 3^5 \}\) and \(\{ [1], [3], [5], [9], [11], [13] \}\). Choose a \(b\) s.t. \(\gcd (b, \varphi(14)) = \gcd(b, 6) = 1\), raise the primitive root \(3\) to the $b$-th power then \(c \equiv 3^b \bmod 14\) (or modulo \(7\)) is the other primitive root. It turns out to be \(5\). (Only \(b = 1\) and \(5\) satisfy \(\gcd(b, \varphi(14)) = 1\).)

    Alternative approach (Thanks to Prof Borman): The choice of \(b\) in the previous discussion gives the hint that we can treat the bijection between \(\{ 1, 3, 3^2, 3^3, 3^4, 3^5 \}\) and \(\{ [1], [3], [5], [9], [11], [13] \}\) as isomorphism between finite groups. We know finite cyclic group \(G\) is isomorphic to \(\ZZ / |G| \ZZ\). In this case, we can work with \(\ZZ /6 \ZZ\) instead, the generators of \(\ZZ / 6 \ZZ\) are obviously in \(\{k \bmod 6: k \in \ZZ, \gcd (k, 6) = 1 \}\), i.e., \(1\) and \(5\). Going back, use the powers \(3^1\) and \(3^5\) to work out what the generators are in the original multiplicative group modulo \(14\), i.e., compute \(3^1 \bmod 14\) and \(3^5 \bmod 14\).

  • Find subgroup lattice of dihedral group \(D_4\) using magma.

    Use Subgroups(); to find all and subgroups and use SubgroupLattice(); to show the subgroup lattice.

    Permutation group D4 acting on a set of cardinality 4
    Order = 8 = 2^3
        (1, 2, 3, 4)
        (1, 4)(2, 3)
    
    all subgroups of D4 are
    
    Conjugacy classes of subgroups
    ------------------------------
    
    [1]     Order 1            Length 1
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 1
    [2]     Order 2            Length 1
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 2
    	    (1, 3)(2, 4)
    [3]     Order 2            Length 2
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 2
    	    (1, 2)(3, 4)
    [4]     Order 2            Length 2
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 2
    	    (2, 4)
    [5]     Order 4            Length 1
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 4 = 2^2
    	    (2, 4)
    	    (1, 3)(2, 4)
    [6]     Order 4            Length 1
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 4 = 2^2
    	    (1, 2)(3, 4)
    	    (1, 3)(2, 4)
    [7]     Order 4            Length 1
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 4 = 2^2
    	    (1, 2, 3, 4)
    	    (1, 3)(2, 4)
    [8]     Order 8            Length 1
    	Permutation group acting on a set of cardinality 4
    	Order = 8 = 2^3
    	    (2, 4)
    	    (1, 2, 3, 4)
    	    (1, 3)(2, 4)
    
    subgroup lattice of dihedral group D4 is
    
    Partially ordered set of subgroup classes
    -----------------------------------------
    
    [8]  Order 8  Length 1  Maximal Subgroups: 5 6 7
    ---
    [7]  Order 4  Length 1  Maximal Subgroups: 2
    [6]  Order 4  Length 1  Maximal Subgroups: 2 4
    [5]  Order 4  Length 1  Maximal Subgroups: 2 3
    ---
    [4]  Order 2  Length 2  Maximal Subgroups: 1
    [3]  Order 2  Length 2  Maximal Subgroups: 1
    [2]  Order 2  Length 1  Maximal Subgroups: 1
    ---
    [1]  Order 1  Length 1  Maximal Subgroups:
    
  • Group of symmetries of a rectangle is isomorphic to \((\ZZ /8 \ZZ)^\times\). And \((\ZZ /8 \ZZ)^\times \cong \ZZ /2 \ZZ \oplus \ZZ /2 \ZZ\). This can be verified by magma code.

    // verify (Z/8Z)* is isomorphic to Z/2Z + Z/2Z
    // get residue classes mod 8
    Z8Z := IntegerRing(8);
    // construct multiplicative group modulo 8
    Z8Zx := MultiplicativeGroup(Z8Z);
    // show (Z/8Z)*
    print "multiplicative group modulo 8 is";
    Z8Zx;
    Abelian Group isomorphic to Z/2 + Z/2
    Defined on 2 generators
    Relations:
        2*Z8Zx.1 = 0
        2*Z8Zx.2 = 0  
    
  • An interesting disussion of why \(\sqrt[3]3 \not\in \QQ(\sqrt[3]2)\).
  • Let \(G\) be a group and \(\{ H_i : i \in I \}\) be a family of indexed subgroups of \(G\) then \(\cap_{i \in I} H_i\) is also a subgroup of \(G\). The concept of subgroup \(H_i\) is related to being “closed” under group operation in \(G\) for elements in \(H_i\). This is similar to a statement in topology that arbitrary intersection of closed sets is closed (Note intersection of only finitely many open sets is a open set. Consider intersection of infinitely many open intervals \(\cap_{n=1}^\infty (a-\frac{1}n, b+\frac{1}n) = [a, b]\) is closed.)
  • Let \(H\) be a subgroup of a group \(G\). For \(a, b \in G\), \(a\) is said to be right congruent to \(b\) modulo \(H\) if \(a b^{-1} \in H\). Similarly \(a\) is left congruent to \(b\) modulo \(H\) if \(a^{-1}b \in H\). The aforementioned congruence modulo \(H\) is an equivalence relation on \(G\) and the equivalence classes of \(a \in G\) under the foregoing congruence modulo \(H\) are right coset of \(H\) in \(G\) and left coset of \(H\) in \(G\) respectively.
  • Let \(H\) and \(K\) be subgroups of \(G\). Then \(H \cap K\) is also a subgroup in \(K\) (or \(H\)).

    Proof. For any \(c_1, c_2 \in C:=H \cap K\), we need to show \(c_1 c_2^{-1} \in C\). \(c_1 \in H\) and \(H\) a subgroup of \(G\) implies that \(c_1^{-1} \in H\). By the same token, \(c_1^{-1} \in K\). Therefore \(c_1^{-1} \in C\). Repeat the argument, we have \(c_1 c_2^{-1} \in C\). Q.E.D.

  • Show \(\lvert H K\rvert = \frac{\lvert H\rvert\lvert K\rvert}{\lvert H\cap K\rvert}\).
  • An example explanation of what prime ideal is.
  • No finite field is algebraically closed. Since otherwise

    \[ \prod_{i=1}^n (x - a_i) + 1 = 0 \]

    has a root in this finite field.

  • A nonzero ring has a maximal ideal. An ideal which is not the ring itself is contained in some maximal ideal. Every nonunit is contained in some maximal ideal.
  • $k$-algebra or algebra over a field \(k\) is a vector space equipped with an additional binary operation that is bilinear. Think of this additional operation as multiplication. By bilinearity, we mean this multiplication is left distributive and right distributive also compatible with scalars.

Author: Yün Han

Emacs 26.1 (Org mode 9.1.14)